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Immunity against vaccine-preventable diseases in Finnish pediatric healthcare workers in 2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287657
Source
Vaccine. 2017 Mar 14;35(12):1608-1614
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2017
Author
Karoliina Koivisto
Laura Puhakka
Maija Lappalainen
Soile Blomqvist
Harri Saxén
Tea Nieminen
Source
Vaccine. 2017 Mar 14;35(12):1608-1614
Date
Mar-14-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Communicable Diseases - immunology
Female
Finland
Health Personnel
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Male
Middle Aged
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Healthcare workers (HCWs) pose a risk to themselves and their patients if not protected against vaccine-preventable diseases. Alarmingly, lacking immunity has been reported in several studies. We assessed the immunity against vaccine-preventable diseases in 157 pediatric HCWs in Helsinki Children's Hospital. The HCWs enrolled answered a questionnaire and gave a serum sample. Antibodies were measured with EIA against MMR-diseases, tetanus and diphtheria toxins, Hepatitis B (HBV), Hepatitis A (HAV), varicella zoster and pertussis toxin. Neutralizing antibodies against poliovirus 1, 2 and 3 were measured. All of the HCWs had antibodies against tetanus and 89.8% against diphtheria. All had measurable levels of polio antibodies to all three polioviruses. 41% had suboptimal levels of antibodies against at least one of the antigens tested: MMR-viruses, diphtheria, HBV or polio. Measles, mumps and rubella antibodies were detectable in 81.5%, 89.2% and 93%, respectively. Only one HCW had no varicella-antibodies. Hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb) were detected in 89.8% of the nurses. 67.5% had HAV-antibodies. A poor correlation between detected antibody levels and reported vaccination history was noticed, indicating a need for a universal record system for registering the vaccines given to each individual.
PubMed ID
28233625 View in PubMed
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Mandatory and recommended vaccination in the EU, Iceland and Norway: results of the VENICE 2010 survey on the ways of implementing national vaccination programmes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123548
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(22)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
M. Haverkate
F. D'Ancona
C. Giambi
K. Johansen
P L Lopalco
V. Cozza
E. Appelgren
Author Affiliation
Radboud University, Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(22)
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Communicable Disease Control - standards
Communicable Diseases - immunology
European Union
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Care Surveys
Health Plan Implementation
Health Policy
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunization Programs
Immunization Schedule
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Mass Vaccination - methods - organization & administration
National Health Programs
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health Practice - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
This report provides an updated overview of recommended and mandatory vaccinations in the European Union (EU), Iceland and Norway, considering the differences in vaccine programme implementation between countries. In 2010, the Vaccine European New Integrated Collaboration Effort (VENICE) network, conducted a survey among the VENICE project gatekeepers to learn more about how national vaccination programmes are implemented, whether recommended or mandatory. Information was collected from all 27 EU Member States, Iceland and Norway. In total 15 countries do not have any mandatory vaccinations; the remaining 14 have at least one mandatory vaccination included in their programme. Vaccination against polio is mandatory for both children and adults in 12 countries; diphtheria and tetanus vaccination in 11 countries and hepatitis B vaccination in 10 countries. For eight of the 15 vaccines considered, some countries have a mixed strategy of recommended and mandatory vaccinations. Mandatory vaccination may be considered as a way of improving compliance to vaccination programmes. However, compliance with many programmes in Europe is high, using only recommendations. More information about the diversity in vaccine offer at European level may help countries to adapt vaccination strategies based on the experience of other countries. However, any proposal on vaccine strategies should be developed taking into consideration the local context habits.
PubMed ID
22687916 View in PubMed
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Primary immunodeficiency in infection-prone children in southern Sweden: occurrence, clinical characteristics and immunological findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262958
Source
BMC Immunol. 2014;15:31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Nicholas Brodszki
Göran Jönsson
Lillemor Skattum
Lennart Truedsson
Source
BMC Immunol. 2014;15:31
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Communicable Diseases - immunology
Complement System Proteins - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Lymphocytes - immunology
Male
Reference Values
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders mainly characterized by increased susceptibility to infections. The aims of this study were to estimate the occurrence rate of PID in the paediatric (age?=?18?years) population of southern Sweden (approx. 265,000 children) and to describe their demographic, clinical and immunological characteristics. During a period of 4?years, in four paediatric speciality clinics in Sk?ne County in southern Sweden, children being seen for infections and fulfilling specific criteria were evaluated according to a predefined examination schedule. The initial analysis consisted of complete blood counts with analysis of lymphocyte subpopulations (T, B, NK cells), measurement of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgE and IgG subclasses), and assessment of the complement system (classical, alternative and lectin pathways). In addition, results of these immunological analyses in other children from the same area and time period were evaluated.
In total, 259 children (53.6% males) met the criteria and were included. The most common infection was recurrent otitis media. Immunological analyses results for about two thirds of the patients were outside age-related reference intervals. Further examination in this latter group identified 15 children with PID (9 males); 7 (2.7%) had genetically defined PID, representing 4 different diagnoses, and another 8 (3.1%) had a clinically defined PID - common variable immunodeficiency. No additional PID patient was identified from the evaluation of laboratory results in children not included in the study. The median age at diagnosis was 3.5?years (range 1-12 years).
The occurrence rate of PID was about 4 new cases per year in this population. Several different PID diagnoses were found, and the application of specified criteria to identify PID patients was useful. In children who are prone to infection, the use of a predefined set of immunological laboratory analyses at their first examination was beneficial for early identification of patients with PID.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25318568 View in PubMed
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Public preferences for vaccination programmes during pandemics caused by pathogens transmitted through respiratory droplets - a discrete choice experiment in four European countries, 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280654
Source
Euro Surveill. 2016 Jun 02;21(22)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-02-2016
Author
Domino Determann
Ida J Korfage
Angela Fagerlin
Ewout W Steyerberg
Michiel C Bliemer
Helene A Voeten
Jan Hendrik Richardus
Mattijs S Lambooij
Esther W de Bekker-Grob
Source
Euro Surveill. 2016 Jun 02;21(22)
Date
Jun-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Choice Behavior
Communicable Diseases - immunology - psychology
Europe - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Immunization Programs - utilization
Influenza Vaccines - therapeutic use
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Pandemics - prevention & control
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Poland - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaccination - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aims to quantify and compare preferences of citizens from different European countries for vaccination programme characteristics during pandemics, caused by pathogens which are transmitted through respiratory droplets. Internet panel members, nationally representative based on age, sex, educational level and region, of four European Union Member States (Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and Sweden, n?=?2,068) completed an online discrete choice experiment. These countries, from different geographical areas of Europe, were chosen because of the availability of high-quality Internet panels and because of the cooperation between members of the project entitled Effective Communication in Outbreak Management: development of an evidence-based tool for Europe (ECOM). Data were analysed using panel latent class regression models. In the case of a severe pandemic scenario, vaccine effectiveness was the most important characteristic determining vaccination preference in all countries, followed by the body that advises on vaccination. In Sweden, the advice of family and/or friends and the advice of physicians strongly affected vaccine preferences, in contrast to Poland and Spain, where the advice of (international) health authorities was more decisive. Irrespective of pandemic scenario or vaccination programme characteristics, the predicted vaccination uptakes were lowest in Sweden, and highest in Poland. To increase vaccination uptake during future pandemics, the responsible authorities should align with other important stakeholders in the country and communicate in a coordinated manner.
PubMed ID
27277581 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Study of the immunity of 3-year-old children in the Province of Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251949
Source
Union Med Can. 1975 Sep;104(9):1386-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1975

[The prospects for an improvement in the immunoprophylaxis of infectious diseases among the troops].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201218
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1999 Jun;320(6):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999

[The role of vaccination in the decline of infectious diseases: viewpoint of the epidemiologist].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246266
Source
Can J Public Health. 1980 Jan-Feb;71(1):37-46
Publication Type
Article

9 records – page 1 of 1.