Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

An epidemic of scabies with unusual features and treatment resistance in a nursing home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240270
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1984 Aug;11(2 Pt 1):242-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1984
Author
S A Moberg
G B Löwhagen
K S Hersle
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1984 Aug;11(2 Pt 1):242-4
Date
Aug-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - therapeutic use
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Disulfiram - therapeutic use
Drug resistance
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Recurrence
Scabies - drug therapy - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
An epidemic of scabies affecting elderly patients on one ward of a nursing home is described. The outbreak was characterized by a high degree of contagion and treatment resistance among patients suffering from malignant diseases and receiving immunosuppressive therapy. The clinical picture was unusual, with papules surmounted by scabies burrows and a high percentage of persistent nodular lesions. The origin of the outbreak was probably a patient with an exfoliative psoriasis, treated with an aromatic retinoid and potent topical corticosteroids. In view of the high recurrence rate, follow-up may be advisable especially in elderly patients.
PubMed ID
6480924 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body Mass Index and Risk of Infections Among Women in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283057
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2016 Jun 01;183(11):1008-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2016
Author
Maria C Harpsøe
Nete M Nielsen
Nina Friis-Møller
Mikael Andersson
Jan Wohlfahrt
Allan Linneberg
Ellen A Nohr
Tine Jess
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2016 Jun 01;183(11):1008-17
Date
Jun-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Risk factors
Skin Diseases, Infectious - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Thinness - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated the possible association between body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) and hospitalization or treatment for acute infection in a prospective cohort study. We linked 75,001 women enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort from 1996 to 2002, who had information on BMI and a broad range of confounders, to data on infectious diseases and use of antimicrobial agents from the National Patient Register and the Danish Prescription Register. Associations were tested using Cox proportional hazards models. During 12 years of follow-up, we observed a U-shaped association between baseline BMI and later hospitalization for 1) any infectious disease and 2) infections of the respiratory tract, whereas a dose-response relationship was seen for skin infections. The most pronounced associations were seen for acute upper respiratory infections at multiple and unspecified sites (underweight (BMI
PubMed ID
27188940 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood Infections and Subsequent School Achievement Among 598,553 Danish Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299936
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 08; 37(8):731-737
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
Ole Köhler-Forsberg
Holger J Sørensen
Merete Nordentoft
John J McGrath
Michael E Benros
Liselotte Petersen
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Clinical Medicine, Psychosis Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 08; 37(8):731-737
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Academic Success
Adolescent
Birth weight
Child
Cohort Studies
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Hospitalizations for infections have been associated with subsequent decreased cognitive ability, but it is uncertain if childhood infections influence subsequent scholastic achievement (SA). We aimed to estimate the association between infections during childhood and SA.
Nationwide prospective cohort study including 598,553 children born in Denmark between 1987 and 1997 and their parents. Exposures were hospitalization for infections and treatment with anti-infective agents. Outcomes were completion of ninth grade and ninth grade test scores. Data were analyzed with logistic and linear regression analysis techniques and adjusted for any mental disorder, birthweight, Apgar score, malformations at birth, chronic somatic diseases, first-born child, parental educational level and parental mental disorders.
Hospitalization with infections was linked to lower completion of ninth grade with an odds ratio of 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.79-0.85) compared with children without prior hospitalizations for infections. Dose-response relationships were observed with respect to number of hospital contacts for infections and a shorter time since last hospitalization (all P
Notes
CommentIn: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 Aug;37(8):729-730 PMID 29505480
PubMed ID
29278614 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hospitalization after Oral Antibiotic Initiation in Finnish Community Dwellers with and without Alzheimer's Disease: Retrospective Register-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301951
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 64(2):437-445
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Heli Järvinen
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 64(2):437-445
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent living
Male
Registries
Abstract
Persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are frequently hospitalized from infection-related causes. There are no previous studies investigating hospitalization associated with antibiotic initiation in persons with AD.
To investigate the frequency and risk of hospitalization associated with oral antibiotic initiation among community dwellers with and without AD.
We performed a retrospective register-based study utilizing register-based Medication Use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort. It includes all community dwellers diagnosed with AD during 2005-2011 in Finland and their matched comparison persons without AD. Antibiotic use was initiated by 34,785 persons with and 36,428 without AD. Drug use data were collected from Prescription Register and comorbidities from Special Reimbursement and Hospital Care Registers. Infection diagnoses were collected from the Hospital Care Register. Factors associated with hospitalization were estimated utilizing logistic regression models.
Risk of hospitalization following antibiotic initiation was higher among antibiotic initiators with AD than without AD (adjusted odds ratio, aOR, 1.37, 95% Cl 1.28-1.46).Strongest association with hospitalization was found for oral glucocorticoid use, aOR 1.41 (1.25-1.59); epilepsy, aOR 1.33 (1.10-1.63); and active cancer, aOR 1.30 (1.14-1.49). Among initiators of cephalexin, pivmecillinam, amoxicillin/amoxicillin, and enzyme inhibitor and doxycycline, persons with AD were more frequently hospitalized than persons without AD. A quarter of hospitalized antibiotic initiators had infection diagnosis in their hospital care records.
Persons with AD initiating an antibiotic had a higher risk for hospitalization than antibiotic initiators without AD. Further research is needed to determine whether infection-related hospitalization could be reduced.
PubMed ID
29914029 View in PubMed
Less detail

Influence of day care attendance on the use of systemic antibiotics in 0- to 2-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32177
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 May;107(5):E76
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
N. Thrane
C. Olesen
J T Md
C. Søndergaard
H C Schønheyder
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark. n.thrane@dadlnet.dk
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 May;107(5):E76
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child Day Care Centers - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Utilization
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between time spent in different public day care settings and prescription of systemic antibiotics. Design. Population-based cohort study of 5035 Danish children born in 1997 followed from birth to June 30, 1999. METHODS: The study was performed by the linkage of records drawn from administrative registries. Exposure was the total time spent in a day care home or day care center. Outcome was the first prescription of a systemic antibiotic. Possible perinatal and sociodemographic confounding factors were considered by statistical analysis. RESULTS: During the first year of life, 39.8% of the girls and 51.1% of the boys received at least 1 antibiotic prescription drug. Enrollment in a day care setting doubled a child's risk of receiving a prescription drug (adjusted relative risk in day care home 1.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.7-2.0; adjusted relative risk in day care center 2.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.7-2.3). Only age confounded the analyses. Age >1 year at the starting time in day care reduced the risk of receiving antibiotic prescriptions during the first 3 months after enrollment. CONCLUSIONS: Enrollment in public day care facilities raised the risk of receiving an antibiotic prescription drug to the same extent in day care homes as well as in day care centers, so we cannot recommend one facility over the other based on the present study. Children
PubMed ID
11331726 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lyme borreliosis in Finland: a register-based linkage study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304223
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2020 Nov 10; 20(1):819
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-10-2020
Author
Eeva Feuth
Mikko Virtanen
Otto Helve
Jukka Hytönen
Jussi Sane
Author Affiliation
Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FI-20521, Turku, Finland. emsaja@utu.fi.
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2020 Nov 10; 20(1):819
Date
Nov-10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Borrelia burgdorferi - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Epidemiological Monitoring
Erythema Chronicum Migrans - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Laboratories
Male
Patient compliance
Patient Discharge
Physicians
Primary Health Care
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Serologic Tests
Young Adult
Abstract
In Finland, the routine surveillance of Lyme borreliosis (LB) is laboratory-based. In addition, we have well established national health care registers where countrywide data from patient visits in public health care units are collected. In our previous study based on these registers, we reported an increasing incidence of both microbiologically confirmed and clinically diagnosed LB cases in Finland during the past years. Here, we evaluated our register data, refined LB incidence estimates provided in our previous study, and evaluated treatment practices considering LB in the primary health care.
Three national health care registers were used. The Register for Primary Health Care Visits (Avohilmo) and the National Hospital Discharge Register (Hilmo) collect physician-recorded data from the outpatient and inpatient health care visits, respectively, whereas the National Infectious Diseases Register (NIDR) represents positive findings in LB diagnostics notified electronically by microbiological laboratories. We used a personal identification number in register-linkage to identify LB cases on an individual level in the study year 2014. In addition, antibiotic purchase data was retrieved from the Finnish Social Insurance Institution in order to evaluate the LB treatment practices in the primary health care in Finland.
Avohilmo was found to be useful in monitoring clinically diagnosed LB (i.e. erythema migrans (EM) infections), whereas Hilmo did not add much value next to existing laboratory-based surveillance of disseminated LB. However, Hilmo gave valuable information about uncertainties related to physician-based surveillance of disseminated LB and the total annual number of EM infections in our country. Antibiotic purchases associated with the LB-related outpatient visits in the primary health care indicated a good compliance with the recommended treatment guidelines.
Avohilmo and laboratory-based NIDR together are useful in monitoring LB incidence in Finland. A good compliance was observed with the recommended treatment guidelines of clinically diagnosed LB in the primary health care. In 2018, Avohilmo was introduced in the routine surveillance of LB in Finland next to laboratory-based surveillance of disseminated LB.
PubMed ID
33167874 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Morbidity in vaccine-preventable infections in the Russian Federation and measures aimed at their decrease and eradication].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184276
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2003 Mar-Apr;(2):16-28
Publication Type
Article
Author
G G Onishchenko
Author Affiliation
Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2003 Mar-Apr;(2):16-28
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Infection Control
Morbidity
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data - trends
Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Abstract
Data on the morbidity in vaccine-preventable infections over the last 10 years in Russia, the analysis of immunization coverage and the level of post-vacination immunity are presented. The conclusions on the epidemic situation with each analyzed infection and decisions on the prospects for their decrease or eradication by the year 2010 are made.
PubMed ID
12886602 View in PubMed
Less detail

Physician consultation and antibiotic prescription in Swedish infants: population-based comparison of group daycare and home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163576
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Jul;96(7):1059-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Katarina Hedin
Malin Andre
Anders Håkansson
Sigvard Mölstad
Nils Rodhe
Christer Petersson
Author Affiliation
Unit of R&D, Kronoberg County Council, Växjö, Sweden. katarina.hedin@ltkronoberg.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Jul;96(7):1059-63
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Child Day Care Centers
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Utilization
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Logistic Models
Office Visits - utilization
Parents
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Risk factors
Rural Population
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
Daycare infants have more infectious episodes, see a physician more often, and are prescribed antibiotics more often than home care infants.
To compare physician consultations and antibiotic prescription in daycare children and home care children taking number of symptom days, sociodemographic factors, concern about infectious illness and antibiotic knowledge into account.
For a cohort of Swedish 18-month-old children all infectious symptoms, physician consultation and antibiotic prescriptions were registered during 1 month.
561 infants with daycare outside the home and 278 with daycare at home were included. Of the daycare infants, 23.2% saw a physician and 11.4% were prescribed antibiotics, as compared with 10.8% physician consultations and 5.0% antibiotic prescription for the home care infants. For daycare infants the crude odds ratio for physician consultation were 2.49 (1.63-3.82) and for antibiotic prescription 2.43 (1.34-4.41) compared with home care infants. However, these differences were no longer statistically significant when background data, concern about infectious illness and reported symptoms were taken into account.
When background data, concern about infectious illness and reported infectious symptoms were taken into account daycare infants saw a physician and was prescribed antibiotics in the same way as home care infants.
PubMed ID
17498187 View in PubMed
Less detail

A prospective study of infectious morbidity and antibiotic consumption among children in different forms of municipal day-care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38310
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1989;21(4):449-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
C. Petersson
A. Häkansson
Author Affiliation
Teleborg Health Centre, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1989;21(4):449-57
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Child
Child Day Care Centers - classification
Child, Preschool
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Morbidity
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
During the 9-month period September 1986-May 1987, reasons for absence and antibiotic consumption were investigated among children cared for in day-care center(s) (DCC) and Swedish town. family day-care (FDC) within a limited geographical area of a medium-sized Swedish town. All 352 children in 11 DCC in this area and 199 children in FDC were included in this prospective study, which intended to elucidate the infectious morbidity. The investigation period comprised 55,760 and 26,019 expected days' attendance for the DCC and FDC children, respectively. A higher absence attributable to infection was evident at all ages in DCC children than in those in FDC. This difference tended to diminish with age. No difference in antibiotic consumption was evident between the 2 categories, and the diagnostic pattern was almost identical. In the DCC, overall absence figures, and absence due to infection, were considerably lower than in earlier comparable studies. Appreciable differences in absence due to infection and antibiotic consumption were also found between different "departments" in the DCC; both low and high-absence groups could be identified. There was an indication of differences between the groups both socially and in the environment at the DCC.
PubMed ID
2587947 View in PubMed
Less detail

Public health and infections: Health in Sweden: The National Public Health Report 2012. Chapter 15.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118063
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(9 Suppl):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012

11 records – page 1 of 2.