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127 records – page 1 of 13.

[A concept of control of antituberculous measures under new socioeconomic conditions in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210130
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(1):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997

An update on risk communication in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289269
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33822
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
2016
Author
Eva-Maria Krümmel
Andrew Gilman
Author Affiliation
Inuit Circumpolar Council, Ottawa, Canada; ekruemmel@scientissime.com.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33822
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Communicable Disease Control - organization & administration
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Food Contamination
Health Communication
Humans
Inuits
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Public Health
Abstract
Arctic residents can be exposed to a wide range of contaminants through consumption of traditional (country) foods (i.e. food from wild animals and plants that are hunted, caught or collected locally in the Arctic). Yet these foods provide excellent nutrition, promote social cohesion, meet some spiritual needs for connectedness to the land and water, reinforce cultural ties, are economically important and promote overall good health for many. The risk and benefit balance associated with the consumption of traditional Arctic foods is complicated to communicate and has been referred to as the "Arctic Dilemma". This article gives an update on health risk communication in the Arctic region. It briefly summarizes some research on risk communication methodologies as well as approaches to an evaluation of the outcomes of risk communication initiatives. It provides information on specific initiatives in several Arctic countries, and particularly those that were directed at Indigenous populations. This article also summarizes some international versus local risk communication activities and the complexity of developing and delivering messages designed for different audiences. Finally, the potential application of social media for risk communication and a summary of "best practices" based on published literature and a survey of Inuit in a few Arctic countries are described.
Several of the risk communication initiatives portrayed in this article indicate that there is only limited awareness of the outcome of risk communication messages. In some cases, risk communication efforts appear to have been successful, at least when effectiveness is measured in an indirect way, for example, by lower contaminant levels. However, due to missing effectiveness evaluation studies, uncertainty remains as to whether a specific risk communication method was successful and could be clearly linked to behavioural changes that resulted in decreased contaminant exposure.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27974140 View in PubMed
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Are we ready? Evidence of support mechanisms for Canadian health care workers in multi-jurisdictional emergency planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160462
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):358-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tracey L O'Sullivan
Carol A Amaratunga
Jill Hardt
Darcie Dow
Karen P Phillips
Wayne Corneil
Author Affiliation
Women's Health Research Unit, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):358-63
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communicable Disease Control - organization & administration
Consumer Health Information
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Education, Public Health Professional
Female
Government
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Planning - organization & administration
Health Policy
Humans
Information Dissemination
Interinstitutional Relations
Male
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control - psychology
Public Health Administration - education
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Abstract
Federal, provincial and municipal leaders in Canada have adopted a culture of preparedness with the development and update of emergency plans in anticipation of different types of disasters. As evident during the 2003 global outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), it is important to provide support for health care workers (HCWs) who are vulnerable during infectious outbreak scenarios. Here we focus on the identification and evaluation of existing support mechanisms incorporated within emergency plans across various jurisdictional levels.
Qualitative content analysis of 12 emergency plans from national, provincial and municipal levels were conducted using NVIVO software. The plans were scanned and coded according to 1) informational, 2) instrumental, and 3) emotional support mechanisms for HCWs and other first responders.
Emergency plans were comprised of a predominance of informational and instrumental supports, yet few emotional or social support mechanisms. All the plans lacked gender-based analysis of how infectious disease outbreaks impact male and female HCWs differently. Acknowledgement of the need for emotional supports was evident at higher jurisdictional levels, but recommended for implementation locally.
While support mechanisms for HCWs are included in this sample of emergency plans, content analysis revealed few emotional or social supports planned for critical personnel; particularly for those who will be required to work in extremely stressful conditions under significant personal risk. The implications of transferring responsibilities for support to local and institutional jurisdictions are discussed.
PubMed ID
17985675 View in PubMed
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[Bioterrorism and health security in the European Union]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57385
Source
Presse Med. 2005 Jan 29;34(2 Pt 2):156-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-2005
Author
Georgios Gouvras
Germain Thinus
Frank Van-Loock
Philippe Bossi
Author Affiliation
Public Health Directorate, JMO C3/32, European Commission, L-2920 Luxembourg. georgios.gouvras@cec.eu.int
Source
Presse Med. 2005 Jan 29;34(2 Pt 2):156-60
Date
Jan-29-2005
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Communicable Disease Control - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems - organization & administration
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
English Abstract
Europe
European Union
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
International Cooperation
Pharmaceutical Preparations - supply & distribution
Public Health - methods
Security Measures - organization & administration
Vaccination
Abstract
A PROGRAM OF ACTION AND COOPERATION: Since 2001, a series of measures have been taken by the Member States, the European Union and the International authorities to reinforce the preparation and response to biological and chemical terrorist acts. It is essential that the Member States can mutually consult and coordinate their preparation and response as widely as possible. THE ROLE OF THE HEALTH SECURITY COMMITTEE: Together with the health security committee, the European Union has setup a mechanism of consultation and coordination that can be recommend and guide joint action in an emergency, and guarantee the coherence of the counter-actions throughout the Union. This is a committee also constitutes the framework within which the emergency strategies and model-simulations are exchange, and in which assistance in the form of expertise and other resources can be obtained among the Member States. IN THE YEARS TO COME: The future European Centre for the prevention and control of disease, the implantation and functioning of which will start in Sweden in 2005, will play a fundamental part in the harmonisation of the European response to any eventual terrorist acts, whether biological or chemical.
PubMed ID
15687966 View in PubMed
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Building a better blood system for Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196771
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 Jul-Aug;91 Suppl 1:S40-1, S43-4
Publication Type
Article

Canada's Laboratory Centre for Disease Control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214828
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1995 Jul;61(7):575-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995

A Canadian Agency for Public Health: could it work?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181913
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Jan 20;170(2):222-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2004
Author
Kumanan Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. kumanan.wilson@uhn.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Jan 20;170(2):222-3
Date
Jan-20-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communicable Disease Control - organization & administration
Government Agencies - organization & administration
Humans
Program Development
Public Health Administration
Risk assessment
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - prevention & control
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 May 27;168(11):1381, 138312771050
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Apr 18;162(8):1171-410789636
PubMed ID
14734436 View in PubMed
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127 records – page 1 of 13.