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13 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
Can Respir J. 2003 May-Jun;10(4):190-1
Publication Type
Article

Community representation: broadening the perspective and value base of research ethics boards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177438
Source
NCEHR Commun. 2001 Sep;11(1):11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001

Determining the level of statistician participation on Canadian-based research ethics boards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174356
Source
IRB. 2005 Mar-Apr;27(2):11-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lehana Thabane
Aaron Childs
Amanda Lafontaine
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Canada.
Source
IRB. 2005 Mar-Apr;27(2):11-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Committee Membership
Ethics Committees, Research - organization & administration
Human Experimentation - standards
Humans
Research Design
Statistics as Topic - manpower
PubMed ID
15948326 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evolution of hospital clinical ethics committees in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145000
Source
J Med Ethics. 2010 Mar;36(3):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Alice Gaudine
Linda Thorne
Sandra M LeFort
Marianne Lamb
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's NL A1B 3V6, Canada.
Source
J Med Ethics. 2010 Mar;36(3):132-7
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Committee Membership
Ethics Committees, Clinical - organization & administration - trends
Hospital Administration - trends
Hospital Bed Capacity
Humans
Questionnaires
Abstract
To investigate the current status of hospital clinical ethics committees (CEC) and how they have evolved in Canada over the past 20 years, this paper presents an overview of the findings from a 2008 survey and compares these findings with two previous Canadian surveys conducted in 1989 and 1984. All Canadian hospitals over 100 beds, of which at least some were acute care, were surveyed to determine the structure of CEC, how they function, the perceived achievements of these committees and opinions about areas with which CEC should be involved. The percentage of hospitals with CEC in our sample was found to be 85% compared with 58% and 18% in 1989 and 1984, respectively. The wide variation in the size of committees and the composition of their membership has continued. Meetings of CEC have become more regularised and formalised over time. CEC continue to be predominately advisory in their nature, and by 2008 there was a shift in the priority of the activities of CEC to meeting ethics education needs and providing counselling and support with less emphasis on advising about policy and procedures. More research is needed on how best to define what the scope of activities of CEC should be in order to meet the needs of hospitals in Canada and elsewhere. More research also is needed on the actual outcomes to patients, families, health professionals and organisations from the work of these committees in order to support the considerable time committee members devote to this endeavour.
PubMed ID
20211990 View in PubMed
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Labour-management forums and workplace performance. Evidence from union officials in health care organizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186990
Source
J Manag Med. 2002;16(6):408-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Terry H Wagar
Kent V Rondeau
Author Affiliation
Department of Management, St Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
J Manag Med. 2002;16(6):408-21
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Committee Membership
Consumer Satisfaction
Data Collection
Efficiency, Organizational
Health Services Administration - trends
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Labor Unions - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Leadership
Organizational Culture
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Task Performance and Analysis
Workplace
Abstract
Many health care workplaces are adopting more cooperative labour-management relations, spurred in part by sweeping changes in the economic environment that have occurred over the last decade. Labour-management cooperation is seen as essential if health care organizations are to achieve their valued performance objectives. Joint labour-management committees (LMCs) have been adopted in many health care workplaces as a means of achieving better industrial relations. Using data from a sample of Canadian union leaders in the health care sector, this paper examines the impact of labour-management forums and labour climate on employee and organizational outcomes. Research results suggest that labour climate is less important in predicting workplace performance (and change in workplace performance) than is the number of LMCs in operation. However, labour climate is found to be at least as important in predicting union member satisfaction (and change in member satisfaction) as is the wide adoption of LMCs in operation. These findings are consistent with the notion that the greater use of LMCs is associated with augmented workplace performance (and a positive change in workplace performance), notwithstanding the contribution of the labour climate in the workplace.
PubMed ID
12534164 View in PubMed
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Needs, motivations, and identification with teaching: a comparative study of temporary part-time and tenure-track health science faculty in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309053
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2019 Sep 11; 19(1):349
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Sep-11-2019
Author
Abigail Grover Snook
Asta B Schram
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Brett D Jones
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. snookabby@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2019 Sep 11; 19(1):349
Date
Sep-11-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Committee Membership
Educational Personnel - psychology
Faculty, Medical
Humans
Iceland
Motivation
Needs Assessment
Pilot Projects
Professional Competence - standards
Review Literature as Topic
Schools, Medical
Teaching - standards
Abstract
About 70% of teachers who instruct healthcare students are considered sessional (adjunct/temporary part-time) faculty and receive limited instruction in pedagogy. Sessional faculty may feel isolated and struggle with their teacher identity, and are often assumed to vary in their commitment, motivation, and ability to teach. However, research on teaching identity, motivations, and needs of sessional faculty is lacking. The aim of this study was to compare similarities and differences between sessional and tenure-track faculty across a health science school to guide faculty development for sessional faculty.
We developed an online needs assessment survey, based on informal interviews and literature reviews. Seventy-eight tenure-track faculty and 160 sessional faculty completed the survey (37, 25% response rate, respectively). We used validated scales to assess intrinsic motivation, identified regulated motivation, and identification with teaching, as well as developed scales (perceived connectedness, motivated by appreciation to try new teaching method) and single items. All scales demonstrated good internal consistency. We compared sessional and tenure-track faculty using t-tests/chi-square values.
We found similarities between sessional and tenure-track faculty in intrinsic motivation, identified regulated motivation, and identification with teaching. However, sessional faculty perceived less department connectedness and were more motivated to improve instruction if shown appreciation for trying new teaching methods. Sessional faculty agreed more that they desired pedagogy instruction before starting to teach and that teachers should invest energy in improving their teaching. Admitting to less participation in activities to enhance teaching in the last year, sessional faculty were more interested in digital formats of faculty development.
Our comparison suggested that sessional faculty value being a teacher as part of their self, similar to tenured faculty, but desired more appreciation for efforts to improve and perceived less connectedness to their university department than tenured faculty. They also preferred digital formats for pedagogy to improve accessibility, prior to and throughout their teaching career to support their development as teachers. Using this information as a guide, we provide suggestions for faculty development for sessional faculty. Supporting sessional faculty in the health sciences should improve the quality of teaching and positively affect student learning.
PubMed ID
31510995 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of financial conflicts of interest among panel members producing clinical practice guidelines in Canada and United States: cross sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130562
Source
BMJ. 2011;343:d5621
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Jennifer Neuman
Deborah Korenstein
Joseph S Ross
Salomeh Keyhani
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029, USA.
Source
BMJ. 2011;343:d5621
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Committee Membership
Conflict of Interest - economics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis
Disclosure - ethics - statistics & numerical data
Drug Industry
Financial Support - ethics
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - diagnosis
Mass Screening
Policy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prevalence
Societies, Medical
United States
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of financial conflicts of interest among members of panels producing clinical practice guidelines on screening, treatment, or both for hyperlipidaemia or diabetes.
Cross sectional study.
Relevant guidelines published by national organisations in the United States and Canada between 2000 and 2010.
Members of guideline panels.
Prevalence of financial conflicts of interest among members of guideline panels and chairs of panels.
Fourteen guidelines met our search criteria, of which five had no accompanying declaration of conflicts of interest by panel members. 288 panel members had participated in the guideline development process. Among the 288 panel members, 138 (48%) reported conflicts of interest at the time of the publication of the guideline and 150 (52%) either stated that they had no such conflicts or did not have an opportunity to declare any. Among 73 panellists who formally declared no conflicts, 8 (11%) were found to have one or more. Twelve of the 14 guideline panels evaluated identified chairs, among whom six had financial conflicts of interest. Overall, 150 (52%) panel members had conflicts, of which 138 were declared and 12 were undeclared. Panel members from government sponsored guidelines were less likely to have conflicts of interest compared with guidelines sponsored by non-government sources (15/92 (16%) v 135/196 (69%); P
Notes
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Comment In: BMJ. 2011;343:d572821990258
PubMed ID
21990257 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.