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516 records – page 1 of 52.

A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145997
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
I. Melle
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. o.s.e.ilner@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission.
We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary (n = 126) group as to psychopathology and functioning using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scales at baseline, after 3 months and at 2 year follow-up. Moreover, duration of supportive psychotherapy, medication and number of hospitalisations during the 2 years were measured.
More women than men were admitted involuntarily. Voluntary patients had less psychopathology and better functioning than involuntary patients at baseline. No significant difference as to duration of psychotherapy and medication between groups was found. No significant difference was found as to psychopathology and functioning between voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients at follow-up.
Legal admission status per se did not seem to influence treatment adherence and outcome.
PubMed ID
20085554 View in PubMed
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10 year survey of pretrial examinations in Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246688
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):683-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
R. Kunjukrishnan
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):683-9
Date
Nov-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Crime
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Abstract
The results of a survey of pretrial examination cases admitted to the provincial psychiatric hospital in Saskatchewan from 1966 to 1975 are reported. The demographic and psychiatric data and data from the psychiatric reports to the Court are analyzed. Some deficiencies noted in the reports to the Court are discussed and some remedial measures are suggested.
PubMed ID
519634 View in PubMed
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1933-2003: lessons from 70 years of experience with mental health, capacity and consent legislation in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179705
Source
Health Law Can. 2004 Apr;24(3):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004

Accountability and psychiatric disorders: how do forensic psychiatric professionals think?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148112
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;32(6):355-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pontus Höglund
Sten Levander
Henrik Anckarsäter
Susanna Radovic
Author Affiliation
Forensic Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Science, Malmo, Lund University, Sweden. pontus.hoglund@med.lu.se
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;32(6):355-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Character
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Comorbidity
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology
Educational Status
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Insanity Defense
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient care team
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Social Responsibility
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Swedish penal law does not exculpate on the grounds of diminished accountability; persons judged to suffer from severe mental disorder are sentenced to forensic psychiatric care instead of prison. Re-introduction of accountability as a condition for legal responsibility has been advocated, not least by forensic psychiatric professionals. To investigate how professionals in forensic psychiatry would assess degree of accountability based on psychiatric diagnoses and case vignettes, 30 psychiatrists, 30 psychologists, 45 nurses, and 45 ward attendants from five forensic psychiatric clinics were interviewed. They were asked (i) to judge to which degree (on a dimensional scale from 1 to 5) each of 12 psychiatric diagnoses might affect accountability, (ii) to assess accountability from five case vignettes, and (iii) to list further factors they regarded as relevant for their assessment of accountability. All informants accepted to provide a dimensional assessment of accountability on this basis and consistently found most types of mental disorders to reduce accountability, especially psychotic disorders and dementia. Other factors thought to be relevant were substance abuse, social network, personality traits, social stress, and level of education.
PubMed ID
19811835 View in PubMed
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Accumulated coercion and short-term outcome of inpatient psychiatric care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142568
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Lars Kjellin
Tuula Wallsten
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Psychiatric Research Centre, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. lars.kjellin@orebroll.se
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:53
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale - statistics & numerical data
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Discharge
Patient satisfaction
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The knowledge of the impact of coercion on psychiatric treatment outcome is limited. Multiple measures of coercion have been recommended. The aim of the study was to examine the impact of accumulated coercive incidents on short-term outcome of inpatient psychiatric care
233 involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patients were interviewed within five days of admission and at discharge or after maximum three weeks of care. Coercion was measured as number of coercive incidents, i.e. subjectively reported and in the medical files recorded coercive incidents, including legal status and perceived coercion at admission, and recorded and reported coercive measures during treatment. Outcome was measured both as subjective improvement of mental health and as improvement in professionally assessed functioning according to GAF. Logistic regression analyses were performed with patient characteristics and coercive incidents as independent and the two outcome measures as dependent variables
Number of coercive incidents did not predict subjective or assessed improvement. Patients having other diagnoses than psychoses or mood disorders were less likely to be subjectively improved, while a low GAF at admission predicted an improvement in GAF scores
The results indicate that subjectively and professionally assessed mental health short-term outcome of acute psychiatric hospitalisation are not predicted by the amount of subjectively and recorded coercive incidents. Further studies are needed to examine the short- and long-term effects of coercive interventions in psychiatric care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20584301 View in PubMed
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[A comment to the article by Torbjorn Tannsjo on "severe mental retardation": A necessary even when not sufficient contribution to the debate].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197872
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Jun 14;97(24):2994
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2000
Author
C. Nordin
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping. CoNo@Psy.Liu.SE
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Jun 14;97(24):2994
Date
Jun-14-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Concept Formation
Humans
Intellectual Disability - classification - diagnosis
Mentally Disabled Persons
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
PubMed ID
10900884 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A consensus conference in forensic psychiatry is needed to coordinate survey and care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225664
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 25;88(39):3200-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1991
Author
M. Elton
Author Affiliation
Rättspsykiatriska regionvårdsenheten, Birgittas sjukhus, Vadstena.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 25;88(39):3200-1
Date
Sep-25-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic
Forensic Psychiatry - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Sweden
Violence
PubMed ID
1921615 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A criminal psychiatric study. Review of records on 103 people sentenced to hospitalization or treatment 1970-78].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242018
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Apr 18;145(16):1241-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-1983

Admission and stay in psychiatric hospitals in northern Norway among Sami and a control group: a registry-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125806
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;66(6):422-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Jan Norum
Fred Emil Bjerke
Inger Nybrodahl
Aina Olsen
Author Affiliation
Northern Norway Regional Health Authority, Bodø, Norway and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;66(6):422-7
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Ethnic Groups
Female
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Human Rights
Humans
Language
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Population Groups
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was analyze the admission and inpatient stay at psychiatric hospital in northern Norway among people from the Sami-speaking municipalities (Sami group) and a control group (non-Sami group). Are they treated equally?
All admissions and inpatient stay from the administration area of the Sami language law (eight municipalities) was matched with a control group of 11 municipalities. All adult patients treated during the 2-year time period 2009-2010 and registered by the Norwegian Patient Registry (NPR) were included in the study. Population data as of 2009 was accessed from Statistics Norway. The admission rate and the days in hospital (DiH) rate per 10,000 inhabitants/year were set as 1.0.
Both study groups had a significantly higher admission and DiH-rate than northern Norwegians in general. The median annual admission rate/10,000 inhabitants was 284 (Sami) and 307 (non-Sami), respectively (P =?0.23). Whereas there were no difference between groups with regard to DiH/10,000 inhabitants/year (P =?0.24), the males of the Sami group spent significantly fewer DiH when any form of coercion was used (RR =?0.41).
Sami did not experience significantly more or fewer admissions (voluntary and compulsory) to psychiatric hospitals than the control group. There were significant intergroup variations in both groups.
PubMed ID
22452323 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Admission of patients with dementia to a psychiatric hospital. Social circumstances, circumstances of admission, treatment and further referral].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103280
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jan 22;152(4):232-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-1990
Author
O. Jørgensen
P. Petersen
P. Glue
Author Affiliation
Middelfart Sygehus, Psykiatrisk Afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jan 22;152(4):232-5
Date
Jan-22-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Dementia - diagnosis - drug therapy - nursing
Denmark
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This investigation is a retrospective registration on the basis of the case histories of 290 patients with the main diagnosis dementia who were admitted to a psychiatric hospital in the years 1982 and 1983. The average age was 77 years. Patients with their own homes comprized 61% but only 28% were admitted from their own homes. More than 70% of the patients admitted were described as suffering from moderate or severe dementia on admission. 93% were admitted voluntarily and 91% during the daytime. The reason for admission most frequently registered was the patient's suffering. In 66% of the cases, the general practitioner had attempted treatment prior to admission. During hospitalization the majority of the patients received medicinal treatment. At the conclusion of treatment, 52% were found to be improved and 34% unchanged. 46% of the patients were assessed as requiring maximum nursing-home treatment and 29% were considered to need psychiatric nursing-home treatment. 8% could be discharged to their own homes. The average durations of hospitalization, duration of treatment and waiting-time were reviewed. It is noteworthy that the waiting-time, 311 days, was found to be nearly as long as the duration of treatment, 316 days. In addition, the waiting-times for nursing-homes with maximum care were calculated to be 229 days on an average and for psychiatric nursing homes 596 days.
PubMed ID
2301066 View in PubMed
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516 records – page 1 of 52.