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A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145997
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
I. Melle
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. o.s.e.ilner@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission.
We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary (n = 126) group as to psychopathology and functioning using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scales at baseline, after 3 months and at 2 year follow-up. Moreover, duration of supportive psychotherapy, medication and number of hospitalisations during the 2 years were measured.
More women than men were admitted involuntarily. Voluntary patients had less psychopathology and better functioning than involuntary patients at baseline. No significant difference as to duration of psychotherapy and medication between groups was found. No significant difference was found as to psychopathology and functioning between voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients at follow-up.
Legal admission status per se did not seem to influence treatment adherence and outcome.
PubMed ID
20085554 View in PubMed
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[3',5'-cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitors in the combined treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14188
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Aug;(6):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
O I Bakaliuk
M I Shved
M V Hrebenyk
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Aug;(6):34-7
Date
Aug-1998
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3',5'-Cyclic-Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase - antagonists & inhibitors
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - immunology - metabolism
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation
English Abstract
Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase - blood - drug effects
Humans
Immunity, Cellular - drug effects
Immunity, Natural - drug effects
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Papaverine - therapeutic use
Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Prospidium - therapeutic use
Abstract
A study was made of clinical effectiveness and mechanism of action of the inhibitor of the specific 3',5'-cAMP phosphodiesterase papaverine in a therapeutic complex of measures designed to treat RA patients involving an immunodepressive preparation free from any cytopenic effect prospidin as a basic mediator. It has been shown that the papaverine antiarthritic action is associated with its positive effects on the unspecific component of the immune-complex inflammation, viz. processes of lipid peroxidation, activity of the antioxidant system of defence as well as on the vascular tone and microcirculation. All this improves tissue metabolism, and in this way enhances efficiency of RA basic therapy.
PubMed ID
9844866 View in PubMed
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5-Aminolevulinic acid in intraoperative photodynamic therapy of bladder cancer (results of multicenter trial).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281149
Source
Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther. 2016 Dec;16:106-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
E V Filonenko
A D Kaprin
B Y A Alekseev
O I Apolikhin
E K Slovokhodov
V I Ivanova-Radkevich
A N Urlova
Source
Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther. 2016 Dec;16:106-109
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aminolevulinic Acid - administration & dosage
Combined Modality Therapy - methods
Cystectomy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Photochemotherapy - methods
Photosensitizing Agents - administration & dosage
Russia
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology - therapy
Abstract
The results of multicenter prospective trial for efficacy of combined modality treatment: transurethral resection (TUR)+photodynamic therapy (PDT) with alasens for bladder cancer are represented in the article. Trials were organized by Research Institute of Organic Intermediates and Dyes and conducted according to clinical protocol approved by Ministry of Health of Russia, at the sites of leading Russian cancer clinical centers. The trial included 45 subjects with verified diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients underwent TUR of bladder with simultaneous PDT as anti-relapse treatment. Alasens was administered to patients as intravesicular instillation of 3% solution in volume of 50ml with 1.5-2h exposure (prior to TUR). TUR was performed after instillation. PDT session was conducted immediately after the completion of TUR on a single occasion by means of combined local irradiation on tumor bed with diffuse irradiation on whole urinary bladder mucosa (light dose of local irradiation - 100J/cm2, diffuse irradiation - 20J/cm2). Good tolerance of the treatment was noticed, there were no complications. Among 45 patients included in the trial, 35 (78%) completed 12 month protocol follow-up without relapse. In our study PDT with alasens after TUR reported a recurrence rate of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer for 1st year after treatment of 22%. TUR with intraoperative PDT with 5-aminolevulinic acid may offer an alternative in the treatment of non-muscle-invasive intermediate and high-risk bladder cancer.
PubMed ID
27671517 View in PubMed
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A 9-week randomized trial comparing a chronotherapeutic intervention (wake and light therapy) to exercise in major depressive disorder patients treated with duloxetine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119944
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;73(9):1234-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Klaus Martiny
Else Refsgaard
Vibeke Lund
Marianne Lunde
Lene Sørensen
Britta Thougaard
Lone Lindberg
Per Bech
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk Center København, Rigshospitalet, Afsnit 6202, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 København ø, Denmark. klaus.martiny@regionh.dk
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;73(9):1234-42
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Phototherapy
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Single-Blind Method
Sleep Phase Chronotherapy
Thiophenes - administration & dosage
Abstract
The onset of action of antidepressants often takes 4 to 6 weeks. The antidepressant effect of wake therapy (sleep deprivation) comes within hours but carries a risk of relapse. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new chronotherapeutic intervention combining wake therapy with bright light therapy and sleep time stabilization could induce a rapid and sustained augmentation of response and remission in major depressive disorder.
75 adult patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder, recruited from psychiatric wards, psychiatric specialist practices, or general medical practices between September 2005 and August 2008, were randomly assigned to a 9-week chronotherapeutic intervention using wake therapy, bright light therapy, and sleep time stabilization (n = 37) or a 9-week intervention using daily exercise (n = 38). Patients were evaluated at a psychiatric research unit. The study period had a 1-week run-in phase in which all patients began treatment with duloxetine. This phase was followed by a 1-week intervention phase in which patients in the wake therapy group did 3 wake therapies in combination with daily morning light therapy and sleep time stabilization and patients in the exercise group began daily exercise. This phase was followed by a 7-week continuation phase with daily light therapy and sleep time stabilization or daily exercise. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was the primary outcome measure, and the assessors were blinded to patients' treatment allocation.
Both groups responded well to treatment. Patients in the wake therapy group did, however, have immediate and clinically significantly better response and remission compared to the exercise group. Thus, immediately after the intervention phase (week 2), response was obtained in 41.4% of wake therapy patients versus 12.8% of exercise patients (odds ratio [OR] = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.7-13.4; P = .003), and remission was obtained in 23.9% of wake therapy patients versus 5.4% of exercise patients (OR = 5.5; 95% CI, 1.7-17.8; P = .004). These superior response and remission rates obtained by the wake therapy patients were sustained for the whole study period. At week 9, response was obtained in 71.4% of wake therapy patients versus 47.3% of exercise patients (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3; P = .04), and remission was obtained in 45.6% of wake therapy patients and 23.1% of exercise patients (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3, P = .04). All treatment elements were well tolerated.
Patients treated with wake therapy in combination with bright light therapy and sleep time stabilization had an augmented and sustained antidepressant response and remission compared to patients treated with exercise, who also had a clinically relevant antidepressant response.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00149110.
PubMed ID
23059149 View in PubMed
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The 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 1--blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151165
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Raj S Padwal
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Nadia A Khan
Steven Grover
Donald W McKay
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Finlay A McAlister
Peter Bolli
Machael D Hill
Jeff Mahon
Martin G Myers
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Lyne Cloutier
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Chaim Bell
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Michel Vallée
Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. rpadwal@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-86
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Clinical Competence
Combined Modality Therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Female
Guideline Adherence
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk Management
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
The diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on appropriate blood pressure measurement, the timely assessment of serially elevated readings, the degree of blood pressure elevation, the method of measurement (office, ambulatory, home) and associated comorbidities. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be ascertained to assess global cardiovascular risk and determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment required.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2007 to October 2008 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Key messages include continued emphasis on the expedited, accurate diagnosis of hypertension, the importance of global risk assessment and the need for ongoing monitoring of hypertensive patients to identify incident type 2 diabetes.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations were required to be supported by at least 70% of task force members. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19417858 View in PubMed
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The 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 2--therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151164
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Nadia A Khan
Brenda Hemmelgarn
Robert J Herman
Chaim M Bell
Jeff L Mahon
Lawrence A Leiter
Simon W Rabkin
Michael D Hill
Raj Padwal
Rhian M Touyz
Pierre Larochelle
Ross D Feldman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Norman R C Campbell
Gordon Moe
Ramesh Prasad
Malcolm O Arnold
Tavis S Campbell
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Jacques DeChamplain
George Pylypchuk
Robert Petrella
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Luc Trudeau
Robert A Hegele
Vincent Woo
Phil McFarlane
Michel Vallée
Jonathan Howlett
Simon L Bacon
Patrice Lindsay
Richard E Gilbert
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Sheldon Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. nakhan@shaw.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-98
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Case Management - standards
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Prognosis
Program Evaluation
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To update the evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and management of hypertension in adults for 2009.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. However, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity and mortality data in this field. Progression of kidney dysfunction was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome among patients with chronic kidney disease.
A Cochrane collaboration librarian conducted an independent MEDLINE search from 2007 to August 2008 to update the 2008 recommendations. To identify additional published studies, reference lists were reviewed and experts were contacted. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by both content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
For lifestyle modifications to prevent and treat hypertension, restrict dietary sodium to less than 2300 mg (100 mmol)/day (and 1500 mg to 2300 mg [65 mmol to 100 mmol]/day in hypertensive patients); perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m(2) to 24.9 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (smaller than 102 cm for men and smaller than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 units per week in men or nine units per week in women; follow a diet that is reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol, and that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, dietary and soluble fibre, whole grains and protein from plant sources; and consider stress management in selected individuals with hypertension. For the pharmacological management of hypertension, treatment thresholds and targets should be predicated on by the patient's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. Blood pressure should be decreased to lower than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to lower than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most patients will require more than one agent to achieve these target blood pressures. Antihypertensive therapy should be considered in all adult patients regardless of age (caution should be exercised in elderly patients who are frail). For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic and/or systolic hypertension include angiotensin- converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in patients who are not black), long-acting calcium channel blockers (CCBs), angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs) or beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years of age). A combination of two first-line agents may also be considered as the initial treatment of hypertension if the systolic blood pressure is 20 mmHg above the target or if the diastolic blood pressure is 10 mmHg above the target. The combination of ACE inhibitors and ARBs should not be used. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long- acting dihydropyridine CCBs or ARBs. In patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with cerebrovascular disease, an ACE inhibitor/diuretic combination is preferred; in patients with proteinuric nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (if intolerant to ACE inhibitors) are recommended; and in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (or, in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine CCBs) are appropriate first-line therapies. All hypertensive patients with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents outlined in the Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement (recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease). Selected high-risk patients with hypertension who do not achieve thresholds for statin therapy according to the position paper should nonetheless receive statin therapy. Once blood pressure is controlled, acetylsalicylic acid therapy should be considered.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19417859 View in PubMed
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2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations: the scientific summary--an annual update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151166
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):271-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Norman R C Campbell
Nadia A Khan
Michael D Hill
Guy Tremblay
Marcel Lebel
Janusz Kaczorowski
Finlay A McAlister
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Sheldon Tobe
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. ncampbel@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):271-7
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Life Style
Male
Patient Education as Topic
Program Evaluation
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The present report highlights the key messages of the 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the management of hypertension and the supporting clinical evidence. In 2009, the CHEP emphasizes the need to improve the control of hypertension in people with diabetes. Intensive reduction in blood pressure (to less than 130/80 mmHg) in people with diabetes leads to significant reductions in mortality rates, disability rates and overall health care system costs, and may lead to improved quality of life. The CHEP recommendations continue to emphasize the important role of patient self-efficacy by promoting lifestyle changes to prevent and control hypertension, and encouraging home measurement of blood pressure. Unfortunately, most Canadians make only minor changes in lifestyle after a diagnosis of hypertension. Routine blood pressure measurement at all appropriate visits, and screening for and management of all cardiovascular risks are key to blood pressure management. Many young hypertensive Canadians with multiple cardiovascular risks are not treated with antihypertensive drugs. This is despite the evidence that individuals with multiple cardiovascular risks and hypertension should be strongly considered for antihypertensive drug therapy regardless of age. In 2009, the CHEP specifically recommends not to combine an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with an angiotensin receptor blocker in people with uncomplicated hypertension, diabetes (without micro- or macroalbuminuria), chronic kidney disease (without nephropathy [micro- or overt proteinuria]) or ischemic heart disease (without heart failure).
Notes
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PubMed ID
19417857 View in PubMed
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The 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part 2 - therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143444
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):249-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Daniel G Hackam
Nadia A Khan
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Simon W Rabkin
Rhian M Touyz
Norman R C Campbell
Raj Padwal
Tavis S Campbell
M Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Robert R Quinn
Jeff L Mahon
Robert J Herman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Marcel Ruzicka
Pierre Larochelle
Ross D Feldman
Marcel Lebel
Luc Poirier
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Mukul Sharma
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George K Dresser
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Ellen D Burgess
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Richard E Gilbert
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Philip A McFarlane
Robert A Hegele
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario. dhackam@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):249-58
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Prevention - standards
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Abstract
To update the evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2010.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, randomized trials and systematic reviews of trials were preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. However, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the general lack of long-term morbidity and mortality data in this field. Progressive renal impairment was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome among patients with chronic kidney disease.
A Cochrane Collaboration librarian conducted an independent MEDLINE search from 2008 to August 2009 to update the 2009 recommendations. To identify additional studies, reference lists were reviewed and experts were contacted. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by both content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
For lifestyle modifications to prevent and treat hypertension, restrict dietary sodium to 1500 mg (65 mmol) per day in adults 50 years of age or younger, to 1300 mg (57 mmol) per day in adults 51 to 70 years of age, and to 1200 mg (52 mmol) per day in adults older than 70 years of age; perform 30 min to 60 min of moderate aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m(2) to 24.9 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week for men or nine standard drinks per week for women; follow a diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, dietary and soluble fibre, whole grains and protein from plant sources, and that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol; and consider stress management in selected individuals with hypertension. For the pharmacological management of hypertension, treatment thresholds and targets should be predicated on the patient's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. Blood pressure should be decreased to less than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to less than 130/80 mmHg in patients with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most patients will require more than one agent to achieve these target blood pressures. Antihypertensive therapy should be considered in all adult patients regardless of age (caution should be exercised in elderly patients who are frail). For adults without compelling indications for other agents, considerations for initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics, angiotensin- converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in patients who are not black), long-acting calcium channel blockers (CCBs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) or beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years of age). A combination of two first-line agents may also be considered as initial treatment of hypertension if systolic blood pressure is 20 mmHg above target or if diastolic blood pressure is 10 mmHg above target. The combination of ACE inhibitors and ARBs should not be used, unless compelling indications are present to suggest consideration of dual therapy. Agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include thiazide diuretics, long-acting dihydropyridine CCBs or ARBs. In patients with coronary artery disease, ACE inhibitors, ARBs or betablockers are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with cerebrovascular disease, an ACE inhibitor/diuretic combination is preferred; in patients with proteinuric nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (if intolerant to ACE inhibitors) are recommended; and in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (or, in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine CCBs) are appropriate first-line therapies. In selected high-risk patients in whom combination therapy is being considered, an ACE inhibitor plus a long-acting dihydropyridine CCB is preferable to an ACE inhibitor plus a thiazide diuretic. All hypertensive patients with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents outlined in the Canadian lipid treatment guidelines. Selected patients with hypertension who do not achieve thresholds for statin therapy, but who are otherwise at high risk for cardiovascular events, should nonetheless receive statin therapy. Once blood pressure is controlled, low-dose acetylsalicylic acid therapy should be considered.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the 63 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 80% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
The Canadian Hypertension Education Program process is sponsored by the Canadian Hypertension Society, Blood Pressure Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, the Canadian Pharmacists Association, the Canadian Council of Cardiovascular Nurses, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20485689 View in PubMed
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The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure management guidelines update: focus on sleep apnea, renal dysfunction, mechanical circulatory support, and palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134302
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Publication Type
Article
Author
Robert S McKelvie
Gordon W Moe
Anson Cheung
Jeannine Costigan
Anique Ducharme
Estrellita Estrella-Holder
Justin A Ezekowitz
John Floras
Nadia Giannetti
Adam Grzeslo
Karen Harkness
George A Heckman
Jonathan G Howlett
Simon Kouz
Kori Leblanc
Elizabeth Mann
Eileen O'Meara
Miroslav Rajda
Vivek Rao
Jessica Simon
Elizabeth Swiggum
Shelley Zieroth
J Malcolm O Arnold
Tom Ashton
Michel D'Astous
Paul Dorian
Haissam Haddad
Debra L Isaac
Marie-Hélène Leblanc
Peter Liu
Bruce Sussex
Heather J Ross
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. robert.mckelvie@phri.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Heart-Assist Devices
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Palliative Care - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Societies, Medical
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Focused Update reviews the recently published clinical trials that will potentially impact on management. Also reviewed is the less studied but clinically important area of sleep apnea. Finally, patients with advanced HF represent a group of patients who pose major difficulties to clinicians. Advanced HF therefore is examined from the perspectives of HF complicated by renal failure, the role of palliative care, and the role of mechanical circulatory support (MCS). All of these topics are reviewed from a perspective of practical applications. Important new studies have demonstrated in less symptomatic HF patients that cardiac resynchronization therapy will be of benefit. As well, aldosterone receptor antagonists can be used with benefit in less symptomatic HF patients. The important role of palliative care and the need to address end-of-life issues in advanced HF are emphasized. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of sleep apnea complicating the course of HF and the role of a sleep study for the proper assessment and management of the conditon. Patients with either acute severe or chronic advanced HF with otherwise good life expectancy should be referred to a cardiac centre capable of providing MCS. Furthermore, patients awaiting heart transplantation who deteriorate or are otherwise not likely to survive until a donor organ is found should be referred for MCS.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;27(6):871.e721885242
PubMed ID
21601772 View in PubMed
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