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1083 records – page 1 of 109.

17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18539
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2002 Dec;83(1-5):119-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
P. Vihko
P. Härkönen
O. Oduwole
S. Törn
R. Kurkela
K. Porvari
A. Pulkka
V. Isomaa
Author Affiliation
Biocenter Oulu and Research Center for Molecular Endocrinology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland. pvihko@whoccr.oulu.fi
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2002 Dec;83(1-5):119-22
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - metabolism
Breast Neoplasms - enzymology
Cell Line
Colonic Neoplasms - enzymology - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - enzymology
Oxygen - metabolism
Prostatic Neoplasms - enzymology
Protein Isoforms
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
17 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSDs) catalyze the interconversions between active 17 beta-hydroxysteroids and less-active 17-ketosteroids thereby affecting the availability of biologically active estrogens and androgens in a variety of tissues. The enzymes have different enzymatic properties and characteristic cell-specific expression patterns, suggesting differential physiological functions for the enzymes. Epidemiological and endocrine evidence indicate that estrogens play a key role in the etiology of breast cancer while androgens are involved in mechanisms controlling the growth of prostatic cells, both normal and malignant. Recently, we have developed, using LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines, a cell model to study the progression of prostate cancer. In the model LNCaP cells are transformed in culture condition to more aggressive cells, able to grow in suspension cultures. Our results suggest that substantial changes in androgen and estrogen metabolism occur in the cells during the process. These changes lead to increased production of active estrogens during transformation of the cells. Data from studies of breast cell lines and tissues suggest that the oxidative 17HSD type 2 may predominate in human non-malignant breast epithelial cells, while the reductive 17HSD type 1 activity prevails in malignant cells. Deprivation of an estrogen response by using specific 17HSD type 1 inhibitors is a tempting approach to treat estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Our recent studies demonstrate that in addition to sex hormone target tissues, estrogens may be important in the development of cancer in some other tissues previously not considered as estrogen target tissues such as colon. Our data show that the abundant expression of 17HSD type 2 present in normal colonic mucosa is significantly decreased during colon cancer development.
PubMed ID
12650708 View in PubMed
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17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2: independent prognostic significance and evidence of estrogen protection in female patients with colon cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18039
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2003 Nov;87(2-3):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Olayiwola O Oduwole
Markus J Mäkinen
Veli V Isomaa
Anitta Pulkka
Petra Jernvall
Tuomo J Karttunen
Pirkko T Vihko
Author Affiliation
Biocenter Oulu, Research Center for Molecular Endocrinology, WHO Collaborating Centre for Research on Reproductive Health, P.O. Box 5000, University of Oulu, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2003 Nov;87(2-3):133-40
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colonic Neoplasms - enzymology - genetics - pathology
Comparative Study
Estrogens - metabolism
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Isoenzymes - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
The mRNA expression of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) types 1 and 2 enzymes catalyzing opposite reaction of estrogen metabolism was investigated in colon cancer. Further, the significance of the 17HSD type 2 enzyme as a possible marker of colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis was studied. In the normal mucosa, 17HSD type 2 mRNA was predominantly expressed in the surface epithelium and in the upper parts of the crypts. In the lamina propria expression was seen in endothelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes. In colorectal tumors, 17HSD type 2 expression was in most cases downregulated. Female patients had significantly more cancers with high 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression (n=11/35; 31%) than male patients (n=3/39; 8%) (P=0.02). We observed a significant impact of 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression on survival in female patients with distal colorectal cancer (n=24), with an overall cumulative 5-year survival rate of 54% in those with low 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression. None of the female patients with high 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression survived (n=11; P=0.0068; log rank 7.32). In male patients, no significant association with survival was observed. Our data provide evidence suggesting that low 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression is an independent marker of favorable prognosis in females with distal colorectal cancer, supporting the presence of gender- and location-related differences in the pathogenesis of colon cancer.
PubMed ID
14672733 View in PubMed
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Abdominal injuries associated with the use of seatbelts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230885
Source
Am J Surg. 1989 May;157(5):457-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989
Author
J P Appleby
A G Nagy
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Canada.
Source
Am J Surg. 1989 May;157(5):457-8
Date
May-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - etiology
Accidents, Traffic
British Columbia
Colon - injuries
Contusions - etiology
Digestive System - injuries
Female
Humans
Intestinal Perforation - etiology
Intestine, Small - injuries
Male
Mesentery - injuries
Middle Aged
Seat Belts - adverse effects
Spinal Injuries - etiology
Abstract
The mandatory use of seatbelts has become commonplace in Canada, and such legislation was adopted by the province of British Columbia in 1977. This has provided us with an opportunity to study the effects of seatbelt restraints on accident victims, particularly concerning abdominal injuries. Five hundred sixty-two patient charts were reviewed during a 3-year period. Documented use of seatbelts was found in 126 cases. Thirty-six of these patients underwent laparotomy and form the basis of this study. Compared with previously reported figures for blunt abdominal trauma, there was a high incidence of gastrointestinal injuries (67 percent). In addition, associated lumbar spine injuries were found in a large proportion of patients (19 percent, p less than 0.005). We found an increased risk of spinal injury in patients wearing a lap versus a three-point belt.
PubMed ID
2712201 View in PubMed
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Abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86843
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Mar;46(3):198-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Finnerup N B
Faaborg P.
Krogh K.
Jensen T S
Author Affiliation
Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. finnerup@ki.au.dk
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Mar;46(3):198-203
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology - physiopathology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Colon - physiopathology
Constipation - complications - physiopathology
Denmark
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Rectum - physiopathology
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - physiopathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence and character of chronic abdominal pain in a group of patients with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess predictors of abdominal pain. STUDY DESIGN: Postal survey. SETTING: Members of the Danish Paraplegic Association. METHODS: We mailed a questionnaire to 284 members of the Danish Paraplegic Association who met the inclusion criteria (member for at least 10 years). The questionnaire contained questions about cause and level of spinal injury, colorectal function and pain/discomfort. RESULTS: Seventy percent returned the questionnaire (133 men and 70 women). Mean age was 47 years. Thirty-four percent reported having chronic abdominal pain or discomfort. Onset of pain was later than 5 years after their SCI in 53%. Low defecation frequency was more common in patients with abdominal pain/discomfort and constipation more often affected their quality of life compared to patients without abdominal pain/discomfort. The most common descriptors were annoying, cramping/tightening, tender, sickening and shooting/jolting. There was no relation to age, time since injury or level of injury, but more women than men reported abdominal pain/discomfort. There was no relation of abdominal pain to other types of pain. CONCLUSION: Chronic pain located in the abdomen is frequent in patients with long-term SCI. The delayed onset following SCI and the relation to constipation suggest that constipation plays an important role for this type of pain in the spinal cord injured.
PubMed ID
17621311 View in PubMed
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Abdominal symptom associations in a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219766
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1993 Dec;22(6):1093-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
L. Kay
T. Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Medical Department C, Glostrup County Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1993 Dec;22(6):1093-100
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology
Cluster analysis
Colonic Diseases, Functional - diagnosis
Denmark
Diagnosis, Differential
Dyspepsia - diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the association of abdominal symptoms in a random sample of a general population and to find whether the associations could be confirmed at follow-up 5 years later. The study population was a sex- and age-stratified random sample of people living in the western part of Copenhagen County, Denmark. Of 4807 eligible subjects 79% attended the study and filled in a questionnaire on abdominal symptoms. Five years later the study was repeated and 85% of the survivors participated. Data from both studies were analysed separately for sex, age group and the following pain variables: unspecified abdominal pain, pain located to the epigastrium, pain provoked by stress or hunger, pain relieved by eating and pain relieved by defecation. Three clusters of symptoms occurred in all the analyses: borborygmi/altering stool consistency/distension; acid regurgitation/heartburn and nausea/vomiting. Unspecified pain was associated with all three clusters, pain provoked by stress or hunger and pain relieved by defecation associated with the borborygmi/altering stool/distension cluster, whereas pain in the epigastrium and pain relieved by eating did not show consistent relationships to any of the clusters. Additionally, the clusters associated with each other more often than could be expected by chance. As a consequence of our findings we suggest that the three clusters of symptoms constitute three common abdominal syndromes.
PubMed ID
8144291 View in PubMed
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[Abdominoanal resection of the rectum with a lowering of different sections of the left half of the colon].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251871
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1975 Oct;115(10):38-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1975
Author
V D Fedorov
I M Inoiatov
M I Brusilovskii
I F Kharitoshin
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1975 Oct;115(10):38-41
Date
Oct-1975
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - surgery
Adenocarcinoma - surgery
Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous - surgery
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anal Canal - surgery
Carcinoma - surgery
Colon - surgery
Colon, Sigmoid - surgery
Cystadenoma - surgery
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis
Rectal Neoplasms - surgery
Rectum - surgery
Abstract
In tumor localization at the level of 7--12 cm aside from the anus the authors performed 168 abdominoanal resections of the rectum with descending of different portions of the left colon. Among these patients in 126 subjects descending of the sigmoid in the anal canal was performed, in 30 of the splenic angle of the transverse colon, and in 12 of a proximal portion of the descending left colon. Some characteristic features of surgery for descending of different portions of the left colon are described.
PubMed ID
173069 View in PubMed
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Abuse: an integrated and coordinated health sector response is needed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187512
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Nov;16(11):815-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
W E Thurston
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Nov;16(11):815-6
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colonic Diseases, Functional - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Humans
Risk factors
Sex Offenses
Notes
Comment On: Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Nov;16(11):801-512464974
PubMed ID
12464978 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of a faecal occult blood screening protocol for carcinoma of the colon in family practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236220
Source
Fam Pract. 1986 Dec;3(4):246-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
J F Sangster
T M Gerace
M J Bass
Source
Fam Pract. 1986 Dec;3(4):246-50
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control
Diagnostic Errors
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Occult Blood
Ontario
Abstract
Cancer of the colon is the second most common malignancy in North America and screening methods are needed for diagnosing the lesions at an early stage. Faecal occult blood screening is a method of secondary prevention which is particularly adaptable to the family practice setting. In order to test the feasibility of using this test in family practice, 16 family physicians participated in a trial screening programme using the Hemoccult II test. During the two-month trial 776 patients over 40 years of age were screened; 19 of the tests were positive but in two cases patients were thought to have failed to follow dietary and medical restrictions. Of the 17 patients with verified positive tests, further investigation showed five patients had neoplastic disease and three of these had malignant disease. The detection rate for cancer of the colon using the Hemoccult II test was therefore 3/776, equivalent to 3.9 per 1000 cases screened. By narrowing the age range for screening patients to between 45 and 75 years, the time involved to screen the population at risk could be decreased.
PubMed ID
3803770 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of administrative claims data for polypectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133764
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Aug 9;183(11):E743-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-9-2011
Author
Jonathan M Wyse
Lawrence Joseph
Alan N Barkun
Maida J Sewitch
Author Affiliation
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Canada. jonwyse@gmail.com
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Aug 9;183(11):E743-7
Date
Aug-9-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cohort Studies
Colonic Polyps - surgery
Colonoscopy
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Insurance Claim Reporting
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The frequency of polypectomy is an important indicator of quality assurance for population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. Although administrative databases of physician claims provide population-level data on the performance of polypectomy, the accuracy of the procedure codes has not been examined. We determined the level of agreement between physician claims for polypectomy and documentation of the procedure in endoscopy reports.
We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving patients aged 50-80 years who underwent colonoscopy at seven study sites in Montréal, Que., between January and March 2007. We obtained data on physician claims for polypectomy from the Régie de l'Assurance Maladie du Québec (RAMQ) database. We evaluated the accuracy of the RAMQ data against information in the endoscopy reports.
We collected data on 689 patients who underwent colonoscopy during the study period. The sensitivity of physician claims for polypectomy in the administrative database was 84.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.6%-89.4%), the specificity was 99.0% (95% CI 97.5%-99.6%), concordance was 95.1% (95% CI 93.1%-96.5%), and the kappa value was 0.87 (95% CI 0.83-0.91).
Despite providing a reasonably accurate estimate of the frequency of polypectomy, physician claims underestimated the number of procedures performed by more than 15%. Such differences could affect conclusions regarding quality assurance if used to evaluate population-based screening programs for colorectal cancer. Even when a high level of accuracy is anticipated, validating physician claims data from administrative databases is recommended.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21670107 View in PubMed
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1083 records – page 1 of 109.