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Colonic Mucosal Microbiota and Association of Bacterial Taxa with the Expression of Host Antimicrobial Peptides in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311403
Source
Int J Mol Sci. 2020 Aug 22; 21(17):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-22-2020
Author
Jonna Jalanka
Jing Cheng
Kaisa Hiippala
Jarmo Ritari
Jarkko Salojärvi
Tarja Ruuska
Marko Kalliomäki
Reetta Satokari
Author Affiliation
Human Microbiome Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Mol Sci. 2020 Aug 22; 21(17):
Date
Aug-22-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bacteroidetes - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Colitis, Ulcerative - microbiology
DNA, Ribosomal
Enterobacteriaceae - genetics
Finland
Gastrointestinal Microbiome - genetics - physiology
Gene Expression
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - microbiology
Intestinal Mucosa - pathology - physiology
Lipocalin-2 - genetics
Pancreatitis-Associated Proteins - genetics
Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins - genetics
beta-Defensins - genetics
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), are chronic debilitating disorders of unknown etiology. Over 200 genetic risk loci are associated with IBD, highlighting a key role for immunological and epithelial barrier functions. Environmental factors account for the growing incidence of IBD, and microbiota are considered as an important contributor. Microbiota dysbiosis can lead to a loss of tolerogenic immune effects and initiate or exacerbate inflammation. We aimed to study colonic mucosal microbiota and the expression of selected host genes in pediatric UC. We used high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing to profile microbiota in colonic biopsies of pediatric UC patients (n = 26) and non-IBD controls (n = 27). The expression of 13 genes, including five for antimicrobial peptides, in parallel biopsies was assessed with qRT-PCR. The composition of microbiota between UC and non-IBD differed significantly (PCoA, p = 0.001). UC children had a decrease in Bacteroidetes and an increase in several family-level taxa including Peptostreptococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, which correlated negatively with the expression of antimicrobial peptides REG3G and DEFB1, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae correlated positively with the expression siderophore binding protein LCN2 and Betaproteobacteria negatively with DEFB4A expression. The results indicate that reciprocal interaction of epithelial microbiota and defense mechanisms play a role in UC.
PubMed ID
32842596 View in PubMed
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Impact of Clostridium difficile colitis on 5-year health outcomes in patients with ulcerative colitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119909
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Dec;36(11-12):1032-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
S K Murthy
A H Steinhart
J. Tinmouth
P C Austin
N. Daneman
G C Nguyen
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai Hospital IBD Centre, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. sanjay.murthy@utoronto.ca
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Dec;36(11-12):1032-9
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Clostridium difficile - isolation & purification
Cohort Studies
Colectomy - statistics & numerical data
Colitis, Ulcerative - microbiology - mortality - surgery
Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous - microbiology - mortality - surgery
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Clostridium difficile colitis (CDC) is associated with an increased short-term mortality risk in hospitalised ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. We sought to determine whether CDC also impacts long-term risks of adverse health events in this population.
To determine whether CDC also impacts long-term risks of adverse health events in this population.
A population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted of UC patients hospitalised in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2008. Patients with and without CDC were compared on the rates of adverse health events. The primary outcomes were the 5-year adjusted risks of colectomy and death.
Among 181 patients with CDC and 1835 patients without CDC, the 5-year cumulative colectomy rates were 44% and 33% (P = 0.0052) and the 5-year cumulative mortality rates were 27% and 14% (P
Notes
Comment In: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Jan;37(2):285-623252787
PubMed ID
23061526 View in PubMed
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Paucity of mycobacteria in mucosal bowel biopsies from adults and children with early inflammatory bowel disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138933
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2010 Nov;4(5):561-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Petr Ricanek
Sheba M Lothe
Irena Szpinda
Anne T Jorde
Stephan Brackmann
Gøri Perminow
Kristin K Jørgensen
Andreas Rydning
Morten H Vatn
Tone Tønjum
Author Affiliation
Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience and Institute of Microbiology, Oslo University Hospital (Rikshospitalet), Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2010 Nov;4(5):561-6
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biopsy
Child
Colitis, Ulcerative - microbiology - pathology
Crohn Disease - microbiology - pathology
DNA, Bacterial - isolation & purification
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - microbiology - pathology
Intestinal Mucosa - microbiology
Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis - isolation & purification
Norway
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The presence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has previously been inferred in the genesis of Crohn's disease (CD), and a higher incidence of MAP PCR positivity has been demonstrated in the gut and peripheral blood of CD patients than in healthy individuals. The objective of this prospective study was to assess the potential etiological role of MAP in the pathogenesis of CD.
The presence of mycobacteria was assessed in bowel biopsies from newly diagnosed, treatment naïve Norwegian patients with IBD, including CD and ulcerative colitis (UC), as compared to a hospital-based cohort of CD and UC patients. Biopsies were collected from the small and large bowel in 354 individuals with suspected IBD. Detection of mycobacteria was performed by long-term cultivation in combination with direct detection by MAP IS900-specific PCR.
Among the specimens included from the patients with early IBD, samples from only two of the patients with CD (2.7%) and two of the non-IBD controls (1.5%) exhibited a positive growth signal. None of the CD patients and only one of the non-IBD controls was MAP PCR positive. Only the single PCR positive non-IBD control was also mycobacterial culture positive with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis. In the referral patients with long-term IBD, the prevalence of growth signal and MAP PCR positivity was higher (52 and 9%, respectively).
These findings demonstrate the paucity of MAP in the gut of treatment naïve CD patients. This study does not provide evidence for a role of MAP in early IBD.
Notes
Comment In: J Crohns Colitis. 2011 Aug;5(4):373; author reply 37421683311
PubMed ID
21122560 View in PubMed
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Surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis in Stockholm county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103931
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1990;554:1-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C E Leijonmarck
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, St. Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1990;554:1-56
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anastomosis, Surgical - adverse effects
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Colectomy - adverse effects - methods
Colitis, Ulcerative - microbiology - prevention & control - surgery
Feces - analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Ileum - surgery
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Rectum - surgery
Reoperation
Sulfasalazine - therapeutic use
Sweden
Abstract
The colectomy rate in patients with ulcerative colitis has increased during the last 30 years in Stockholm County due to increased incidence and a more liberal attitude to colectomy in acute cases. In an area of Stockholm's size, about 30 patients with UC will require colectomy every year and of these, 12 will be acute cases. The main factor affecting the colectomy rate was the extent of disease at diagnosis. The 25-year cumulative colectomy rate was 65% in patients with total colitis compared to 45% in all patients. The probability of undergoing a colectomy decreased as the duration of disease increased and after five years duration of disease the colectomy rate was about 1% per year. The choice of primary surgical procedure has changed during the study period and subtotal colectomy and ileostomy is now preferred as the surgical procedure of choice, both in acute and elective cases. The frequency of major complications was constant during the period of study but increased with the urgency of intervention, being 25% in elective cases and 46% in acute cases. The overall postoperative mortality fell from 13% during 1960 to 1964 to 2% during 1980-1984. In acute cases the mortality during the same time periods decreased from 36% to 3%. The long-term results of ileorectal anastomosis showed a substantial failure rate and the most common cause of failure was recurrent rectal disease. In patients who still had their ileorectal anastomosis at the time of follow-up the functional results were better than for the pelvic pouch. The ileorectal anastomosis is for some patients a definite solution and in others it avoids or delays an ileostomy and at the same time still permits a pelvic pouch at a later date. The need for secondary surgery after colectomy for UC is great. The cumulative probability of a fist small intestinal obstruction requiring surgery in 483 patients treated by colectomy was 23% after 15 years. The annual incidence was highest in patients treated by pelvic pouch and lowest in patients treated by IRA. The cumulative probability of a first ileostomy revision was 21% after 15 years. In patients with a Kock's pouch the cumulative probability of a first nipple revision was as high as 52% after two years. The need for secondary surgery was initially high in patients treated by pelvic pouch but the need has decreased during the latter years due to improved technique and increasing surgical experience.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1970209 View in PubMed
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Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli in ground beef in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228370
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Sep 15;143(6):519-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1990
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Sep 15;143(6):519-21
Date
Sep-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Colitis, Ulcerative - microbiology
Endotoxins - analysis
Escherichia coli - classification - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections
Food Microbiology
Humans
Manitoba
Meat
Pilot Projects
Serotyping
Notes
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1989 Apr;102(2):253-602649386
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1987 Oct;53(10):2394-63322190
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1988 May;157(5):1054-73283256
Cites: Microb Pathog. 1988 Feb;4(2):103-132849027
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1986 Oct;154(4):631-83528316
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Dec 10;317(24):1496-5003317047
Cites: Infect Immun. 1977 Dec;18(3):775-9338490
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Mar 24;308(12):681-56338386
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1985 Oct;22(4):614-93908473
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1988 Oct;54(10):2536-403060018
PubMed ID
2207907 View in PubMed
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