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30 records – page 1 of 3.

Cadophora margaritata sp. nov. and other fungi associated with the longhorn beetles Anoplophora glabripennis and Saperda carcharias in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298056
Source
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 2018 Nov; 111(11):2195-2211
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Riikka Linnakoski
Risto Kasanen
Ilmeini Lasarov
Tiia Marttinen
Abbot O Oghenekaro
Hui Sun
Fred O Asiegbu
Michael J Wingfield
Jarkko Hantula
Kari Heliövaara
Author Affiliation
Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. riikka.linnakoski@luke.fi.
Source
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 2018 Nov; 111(11):2195-2211
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Coleoptera - microbiology
Finland
Fungi - physiology
Pest Control, Biological
Phylogeny
Symbiosis - genetics - physiology
Abstract
Symbiosis with microbes is crucial for survival and development of wood-inhabiting longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Thus, knowledge of the endemic fungal associates of insects would facilitate risk assessment in cases where a new invasive pest occupies the same ecological niche. However, the diversity of fungi associated with insects remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate fungi associated with the native large poplar longhorn beetle (Saperda carcharias) and the recently introduced Asian longhorn beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) infesting hardwood trees in Finland. We studied the cultivable fungal associates obtained from Populus tremula colonised by S. carcharias, and Betula pendula and Salix caprea infested by A. glabripennis, and compared these to the samples collected from intact wood material. This study detected a number of plant pathogenic and saprotrophic fungi, and species with known potential for enzymatic degradation of wood components. Phylogenetic analyses of the most commonly encountered fungi isolated from the longhorn beetles revealed an association with fungi residing in the Cadophora-Mollisia species complex. A commonly encountered fungus was Cadophora spadicis, a recently described fungus associated with wood-decay. In addition, a novel species of Cadophora, for which the name Cadophora margaritata sp. nov. is provided, was isolated from the colonised wood.
PubMed ID
29948435 View in PubMed
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Climate warming leads to decline in frequencies of melanic individuals in subarctic leaf beetle populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300016
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Jul 10; 673:237-244
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-10-2019
Author
Elena L Zvereva
Mark D Hunter
Vitali Zverev
Oksana Y Kruglova
Mikhail V Kozlov
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Turku, Turku 20014, Finland. Electronic address: elezve@utu.fi.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Jul 10; 673:237-244
Date
Jul-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate change
Coleoptera - physiology
Color
Environmental monitoring
Global warming
Melanins - analysis
Population Dynamics
Russia
Abstract
Intraspecific diversity buffers populations from deleterious impacts of environmental change. Nevertheless, the consequences of climate warming for phenotypic and genetic diversity within populations and species remain poorly understood. The goal of our study was to explore among-year variations in the phenotypic structure of populations and their relationships with climate variability and population dynamics. We analysed multiyear (1992-2018) data on colour morph frequencies within populations of the leaf beetle, Chrysomela lapponica, from multiple sites in the Kola Peninsula (northwestern Russia). We observed a strong decline in the proportion of dark (melanic) morphs among overwintered beetles during the study period; this decline was consistent across all study sites. Using model selection procedures, we explained declines in the dark morph of overwintered beetles by increases in minimum spring (May-June) daily temperatures. Other climatic characteristics, pollution load, and beetle population density were unrelated to variation in colour morph frequencies. Among newly emerged beetles (August), dark morph frequencies also decreased with an increase in average spring temperatures, but were unrelated to mean temperatures during the larval development period (July). These results suggest that the two-fold decline in dark morph frequencies during the past 26?years has been driven by the 2.5?°C increase in spring temperatures, most likely because dark males lose the mating advantages over light males that they obtain during cold springs. The continued loss of dark morphs and related decrease in within-population diversity may render leaf beetle populations more vulnerable to future environmental changes, in particular to those expressed in extreme weather fluctuations. Our study demonstrates that declines in within-population diversity are already underway in subarctic areas, and that these declines are likely driven by climate warming.
PubMed ID
30991315 View in PubMed
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Conservation value of low-productivity forests measured as the amount and diversity of dead wood and saproxylic beetles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303040
Source
Ecol Appl. 2018 06; 28(4):1011-1019
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Aino Hämäläinen
Joachim Strengbom
Thomas Ranius
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, 75007, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Ecol Appl. 2018 06; 28(4):1011-1019
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Biodiversity
Coleoptera
Conservation of Natural Resources
Forests
Pinus sylvestris
Sweden
Abstract
In many managed landscapes, low-productivity land comprises most of the remaining relatively untouched areas, and is often over-represented within protected areas. The relationship between the productivity and conservational value of a site is poorly known; however, it has been hypothesized that biodiversity increases with productivity due to higher resource abundance or heterogeneity, and that the species communities of low-productivity land are a nested subset of communities from more productive land. We tested these hypotheses for dead-wood-dependent beetles by comparing their species richness and composition, as well as the amount and diversity of dead wood, between low-productivity (potential forest growth
PubMed ID
29446863 View in PubMed
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Conservation value of low-productivity forests measured as the amount and diversity of dead wood and saproxylic beetles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303226
Source
Ecol Appl. 2018 06; 28(4):1011-1019
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Aino Hämäläinen
Joachim Strengbom
Thomas Ranius
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, 75007, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Ecol Appl. 2018 06; 28(4):1011-1019
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Biodiversity
Coleoptera
Conservation of Natural Resources
Forests
Pinus sylvestris
Sweden
Abstract
In many managed landscapes, low-productivity land comprises most of the remaining relatively untouched areas, and is often over-represented within protected areas. The relationship between the productivity and conservational value of a site is poorly known; however, it has been hypothesized that biodiversity increases with productivity due to higher resource abundance or heterogeneity, and that the species communities of low-productivity land are a nested subset of communities from more productive land. We tested these hypotheses for dead-wood-dependent beetles by comparing their species richness and composition, as well as the amount and diversity of dead wood, between low-productivity (potential forest growth
PubMed ID
29446863 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consumer-resource dynamics in Arctic ponds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305264
Source
Ecology. 2020 10; 101(10):e03135
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-2020
Author
Melissa H DeSiervo
Matthew P Ayres
Ross A Virginia
Lauren E Culler
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, 03755, USA.
Source
Ecology. 2020 10; 101(10):e03135
Date
10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Aedes
Animals
Coleoptera
Female
Greenland
Larva
Ponds
Abstract
Population dynamics are shaped by species interactions with resources, competitors, enemies, and environmental fluctuations that alter the strength of these interactions. We used a food web approach to investigate the population dynamics of an abundant Arctic mosquito species, Aedes nigripes (Diptera: Culicidae). Specifically, we evaluated the importance of bottom-up variation in aquatic biofilms (food) and top-down predation from diving beetles (Colymbetes dolabratus, Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) on mosquito population performance. In spring 2018, we tracked mosquito and predator populations across eight ponds in western Greenland, measured biofilm productivity with standardized samplers, and estimated grazing pressure by invertebrate consumers with an in situ exclosure experiment. We also assessed the quality of biofilms as nutrition for mosquito larvae and evaluated pond attributes that might influence biofilm productivity and food quality. Our results indicated that mosquito population dynamics were more related to resource quality and intraspecific competition than to the density of predaceous diving beetles. Ponds with better quality biofilm tended to have more hatching larvae and those populations experienced higher per capita mortality. This aggregation of larvae in what would otherwise be the best mosquito ponds was enough to produce relatively low fitness. Thus, the landscape would support more mosquitoes if they instead distributed themselves to match predictions of the ideal free distribution. Although mortality rates were highest in ponds with the highest initial densities, the increased mortality was not generally enough to compensate for initial abundance, and 78% of the variation in the density of mosquitoes emerging from ponds was explained by the initial number of larvae in a pond. Resource quality was a strong predictor of consumer abundance, yet there was no evidence that biofilm grazing pressure was greater in ponds where mosquito density was higher. Collectively, our results suggest that mosquito ponds in western Greenland are a mosaic of source and pseudo-sink populations structured by oviposition tendencies, biofilm resource quality, and density-dependent larval mortality.
PubMed ID
32691414 View in PubMed
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Cypha norvegica nov. sp. (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) described from Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292058
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 01; 4388(2):275-282
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-01-2018
Author
Frode Ødegaard
Oddvar Hanssen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), PB 5685 Torgarden,NO-7485 Trondheim, Norway.. frode.odegaard@nina.no.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 01; 4388(2):275-282
Date
Mar-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animals
Coleoptera
Norway
Abstract
A new staphylinid beetle, Cypha norvegica nov.sp., is described, illustrated and distinguished from similar species within the genus. The type specimens were collected, when swarming, before sunset in an extensively managed grassland in Vågå municipality, Oppland in Norway.
PubMed ID
29690458 View in PubMed
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Dispersal of thermophilic beetles across the intercontinental Arctic forest belt during the early Eocene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301647
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 10 11; 7(1):12972
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-11-2017
Author
Adam J Brunke
Stylianos Chatzimanolis
Brian D Metscher
Karin Wolf-Schwenninger
Alexey Solodovnikov
Author Affiliation
Third Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum of Vienna, Burgring 7, 1010, Vienna, Austria. adam.brunke@canada.ca.
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 10 11; 7(1):12972
Date
10-11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animal Distribution - physiology
Animals
Arctic Regions
Climate
Coleoptera - physiology
Fossils
Paleontology
Phylogeny
Species Specificity
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Massive biotic change occurred during the Eocene as the climate shifted from warm and equable to seasonal and latitudinally stratified. Mild winter temperatures across Arctic intercontinental land bridges permitted dispersal of frost-intolerant groups until the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, while trans-Arctic dispersal in thermophilic groups may have been limited to the early Eocene, especially during short-lived hyperthermals. Some of these lineages are now disjunct between continents of the northern hemisphere. Although Eocene climate change may have been one of the most important drivers of these ancient patterns in modern animal and plant distributions, its particular events are rarely implicated or correlated with group-specific climatic requirements. Here we explored the climatic and geological drivers of a particularly striking Neotropical-Oriental disjunct distribution in the rove beetle Bolitogyrus, a suspected Eocene relict. We integrated evidence from Eocene fossils, distributional and climate data, paleoclimate, paleogeography, and phylogenetic divergence dating to show that intercontinental dispersal of Bolitogyrus ceased in the early Eocene, consistent with the termination of conditions required by thermophilic lineages. These results provide new insight into the poorly known and short-lived Arctic forest community of the Early Eocene and its surviving lineages.
PubMed ID
29021627 View in PubMed
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Factors affecting population dynamics of leaf beetles in a subarctic region: The interplay between climate warming and pollution decline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291075
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 01; 566-567:1277-1288
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2016
Author
Elena L Zvereva
Mark D Hunter
Vitali Zverev
Mikhail V Kozlov
Author Affiliation
Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, Turku 20014, Finland. Electronic address: elezve@utu.fi.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 01; 566-567:1277-1288
Date
Oct-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Coleoptera - physiology
Environmental pollution - analysis
Global warming
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Species Specificity
Abstract
Understanding the mechanisms by which abiotic drivers, such as climate and pollution, influence population dynamics of animals is important for our ability to predict the population trajectories of individual species under different global change scenarios. We monitored four leaf beetle species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feeding on willows (Salix spp.) in 13 sites along a pollution gradient in subarctic forests of north-western Russia from 1993 to 2014. During a subset of years, we also measured the impacts of natural enemies and host plant quality on the performance of one of these species, Chrysomela lapponica. Spring and fall temperatures increased by 2.5-3°C during the 21-year observation period, while emissions of sulfur dioxide and heavy metals from the nickel-copper smelter at Monchegorsk decreased fivefold. However, contrary to predictions of increasing herbivory with climate warming, and in spite of discovered increase in host plant quality with increase in temperatures, none of the beetle species became more abundant during the past 20years. No directional trends were observed in densities of either Phratora vitellinae or Plagiodera versicolora, whereas densities of both C. lapponica and Gonioctena pallida showed a simultaneous rapid 20-fold decline in the early 2000s, remaining at very low levels thereafter. Time series analysis and model selection indicated that these abrupt population declines were associated with decreases in aerial emissions from the smelter. Observed declines in the population densities of C. lapponica can be explained by increases in mortality from natural enemies due to the combined action of climate warming and declining pollution. This pattern suggests that at least in some tri-trophic systems, top-down factors override bottom-up effects and govern the impacts of environmental changes on insect herbivores.
PubMed ID
27266523 View in PubMed
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Fine spatial-scale variation in scavenger activity influences avian mortality assessments on a boreal island.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305848
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(5):e0233427
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2020
Author
Megan J Clarke
Erin E Fraser
Ian G Warkentin
Author Affiliation
Environmental Science Program, Memorial University of Newfoundland-Grenfell Campus, Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(5):e0233427
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Coleoptera
Ecosystem
Feeding Behavior
Forests
Islands
Newfoundland and Labrador
Songbirds
Abstract
Bird-window collisions are the second leading cause of human-related avian mortality for songbirds in Canada. Our ability to accurately estimate the number of fatalities caused by window collisions is affected by several biases, including the removal of carcasses by scavengers prior to those carcasses being detected during surveys. We investigated the role of scavenger behavior in modifying perceived carcass removal rate while describing habitat-specific differences for the scavengers present in a relatively scavenger-depauperate island ecosystem. We used motion activated cameras to monitor the fate of hatchling chicken carcasses placed at building (under both windows and windowless walls) and forest (open and closed canopy) sites in western Newfoundland, Canada. We recorded the identity of scavengers, timing of events, and frequency of repeat scavenging at sites. Using 2 treatments, we also assessed how scavenging varied with 2 levels of carcass availability (daily versus every third day). Scavenger activities differed substantially between forest and building sites. Only common ravens (Corvus corax) removed carcasses at building sites, with 25 of 26 removals occurring under windows. Burying beetles (Nicrophorus spp.) dominated scavenging at forest sites (14 of 18 removals), completely removing carcasses from sight in under 24 hours. Availability had no effect on removal rate. These findings suggest that ravens look for carcasses near building windows, where bird-window collision fatalities create predictable food sources, but that this learning preceded the study. Such behavior resulted in highly heterogeneous scavenging rates at fine spatial scales indicating the need for careful consideration of carcass and camera placement when monitoring scavenger activity. Our observations of burying beetle activity indicate that future studies investigating bird collision mortality near forested habitats and with infrequent surveys, should consider local invertebrate community composition during survey design. The high incidence of invertebrate scavenging may compensate for the reduced vertebrate scavenger community of insular Newfoundland.
PubMed ID
32437410 View in PubMed
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The first record of Euthiconus Reitter in Japan, with comparative notes on remaining Palaearctic species (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308195
Source
Zootaxa. 2019 Oct 29; 4691(1):zootaxa.4691.1.7
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-29-2019
Author
Pawel Jaloszynski
Author Affiliation
Museum of Natural History, University of Wroclaw, Sienkiewicza 21, 50-335 Wroclaw, Poland.. scydmaenus@yahoo.com.
Source
Zootaxa. 2019 Oct 29; 4691(1):zootaxa.4691.1.7
Date
Oct-29-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures
Animals
Body Size
Coleoptera
Europe
Far East
Japan
Male
Russia
Abstract
Two species of Euthiconus Reitter were previously known to occur in the Palaearctic region, distributed in Europe (E. conicicollis (Fairmaire Laboulbène)) and in the Russian Far East (E. lustrificus Kurbatov). A description of the first Japanese species, Euthiconus nopporoensis sp. n., is given, based on specimens collected on Hokkaido. The new species shares with E. lustrificus unmodified male protrochanters and a similar shape of the pronotum; it differs in a bottle-shaped aedeagus, sparser setae on the pronotum, and a shorter antennomere III. Key morphological structures of all Palaearctic species of Euthiconus are illustrated, to facilitate identifications.
PubMed ID
31719416 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.