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35 years of marine natural product research in Sweden: Cool molecules and models from cold waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283493
Source
Prog Mol Subcell Biol. 2017;55:1-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Lars Bohlin
Paco Cárdenas
Anders Backlund
Ulf Göransson
Source
Prog Mol Subcell Biol. 2017;55:1-34
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquatic Organisms - chemistry - genetics
Biological Products - chemistry - therapeutic use
Biomedical Research - trends
Cold Temperature
Marine Biology - trends
Oceans and Seas
Porifera - chemistry - genetics
Sweden
Technology, Pharmaceutical - trends
Abstract
Currents efforts in marine biodiscovery have essentially focused on temperate to tropical shallow water organisms. With more than 6000 species of marine plants and animals, the Kosterfjord area has the richest marine biodiversity in Swedish waters, but it remains understudied. The overall objective of our marine pharmacognosy research is to explore and reveal the pharmacological potential of organisms from this poorly explored region. More generally, we wish to understand aspects of structure-activity relationships of chemical interactions in cold-water marine environment (shallow and deep). Our strategy is based on ecologically guided search for compounds through studies of physiology and organism interactions coupled to identification of bioactive molecules guided by especially in vivo assays. The research programme originated in the beginning of the 1980s with a broad screening of Swedish marine organisms using both in vitro and in vivo assays, resulting in isolation and identification of several different bioactive molecules. Two congenerous cyclopeptides, i.e. barettin and 8,9-dihydrobarettin, were isolated from the deep-sea sponge Geodia barretti, and structurally elucidated, guided by their antifouling activity and their affinity to a selection of human serotonin receptors. To optimize the activity a number of analogues of barettin were synthezised and tested for antifouling activity. Within the EU project BlueGenics, two larger homologous peptides, barrettides A and B, were isolated from G. baretti. Also, metabolic fingerprinting combined with sponge systematics was used to further study deep-sea natural product diversity in the genus Geodia. Finally, the chemical property space model 'ChemGPS-NP' has been developed and used in our research group, enabling a more efficient use of obtained compounds and exploration of possible biological activities and targets. Another approach is the broad application of phylogenetic frameworks, which can be used in prediction of where-in which organisms-to search for novel molecules or better sources of known molecules in marine organisms. In a further perspective, the deeper understanding of evolution and development of life on Earth can also provide answers to why marine organisms produce specific molecules.
PubMed ID
28238034 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism and respiratory disease among children and adults in Helsinki in relation to low-level air pollution and temperature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228944
Source
Environ Res. 1990 Jun;52(1):34-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
A. Pönkä
Author Affiliation
Helsinki City Health Department, Finland.
Source
Environ Res. 1990 Jun;52(1):34-46
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Cold Temperature
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland
Humans
Infant
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Urban health
Abstract
The weekly changes in ambient sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and temperature were compared with the figures for respiratory infection in children and adults and for absenteeism from day-care centers (DCC), schools, and workplaces during a 1-year period in Helsinki. The annual average level of sulfur dioxide was 21 micrograms/m3 and of nitrogen dioxide 47 micrograms/m3; the average temperature was +3.1 degrees C. The levels of these pollutants and the temperature were significantly correlated with the number of upper respiratory infections reported from health centers. Low temperature also correlated with increased frequency of acute tonsillitis, of lower respiratory tract infection among DCC children, and of absenteeism from day-care centers, schools and workplaces. Furthermore, a significant association was found between levels of sulfur dioxide and absenteeism. After statistical standardization for temperature, no other correlations were observed apart from that between high levels of sulfur dioxide and numbers of upper respiratory tract infections diagnosed at health centers (P = 0.04). When the concentrations of sulfur dioxide were above the mean, the frequency of the upper respiratory tract infections was 15% higher than that during the periods of low concentration. The relative importance of the effects of low-level air pollution and low temperature on health is difficult to assess.
PubMed ID
2351127 View in PubMed
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The absorption of calcium, iron and vitamin B12 during alterations in environmental temperature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297206
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical note TN-62-10
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 1963
Author
Chow, Bacon F.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical note TN-62-10
Date
May 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Humans
Diet
Calcium
Vitamin B12
Iron
Cold Temperature
Hot Temperature
Less detail

Accidental cold-related injury leading to hospitalization in northern Sweden: an eight-year retrospective analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257987
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Helge Brändström
Göran Johansson
Gordon G Giesbrecht
Karl-Axel Ängquist
Michael F Haney
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, S-901 85 Umeå, Sweden. helge.brandstrom@vll.se.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:6
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital records
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Hypothermia - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Incidence
Retrospective Studies
Rewarming - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Cold injuries are rare but important causes of hospitalization. We aimed to identify the magnitude of cold injury hospitalization, and assess causes, associated factors and treatment routines in a subarctic region.
In this retrospective analysis of hospital records from the 4 northernmost counties in Sweden, cases from 2000-2007 were identified from the hospital registry by diagnosis codes for accidental hypothermia, frostbite, and cold-water drowning. Results were analyzed for pre-hospital site events, clinical events in-hospital, and complications observed with mild (temperature 34.9 - 32°C), moderate (31.9 - 28°C) and severe (
Notes
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PubMed ID
24460844 View in PubMed
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Acclimatization to cold in man induced by frequent scuba diving in cold water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293858
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1968 Feb;24(2):177-81.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968
Source
American Journal of Physiology. 1947 Jul 1; 150(1):99-108.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1947
Author
Horvath, S.M.
Freedman, A.
Golden, H.
Source
American Journal of Physiology. 1947 Jul 1; 150(1):99-108.
Date
1947
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Cold Temperature
Extreme Cold
Humans
PubMed ID
20252832 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Journal of Physiology. 1949 Dec;110(3-4):330-7.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1949
Author
Glaser, E.M.
Source
Journal of Physiology. 1949 Dec;110(3-4):330-7.
Date
1949
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Cold Temperature
Hot Temperature
Humans
PubMed ID
15406433 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adrenal lipid responses to cold in the dog.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297164
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report AAL-TR-66-2.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1966
Author
Wilbur, Charles G.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report AAL-TR-66-2.
Date
June 1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Adrenal
Lipid
Animals
Dogs
Cold Temperature
Less detail

[A.G.A.R.D. course. The physiology of cold weather survival. Spatind (Norway) April 6-14, 1973].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254962
Source
Riv Med Aeronaut Spaz. 1973 Jan-Jun;36(1):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Source
Riv Med Aeronaut Spaz. 1973 Jan-Jun;36(1):151-6
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Aerospace Medicine
Cold Temperature
Humans
Norway
Physical Education and Training
PubMed ID
4792589 View in PubMed
Less detail

565 records – page 1 of 57.