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151 records – page 1 of 16.

Accidental hypothermia and death from cold in urban areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12050
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1991 Mar;34(4):242-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
M. Tanaka
S. Tokudome
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Fukushima Medical College, Japan.
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 1991 Mar;34(4):242-6
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hypothermia - mortality
Japan - epidemiology
Male
Urban Population
Abstract
Hypothermia is considered a serious problem in big cities. In order to clarify factors contributing to urban hypothermia and death from cold, which will continue to be an issue in cities in the future, we analyzed autopsy reports recorded in the Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office from 1974 to 1983. In a total of 18,346 autopsy reports 157 deaths had been diagnosed as due to exposure to cold. Of these cases, the greatest number were males in their forties and fifties, and most of these were inebriated and/or homeless. Eighty-four percent of urban hypothermia cases occurred when the outdoor temperature was below 5 degrees C, and 50% of deaths from cold occurred when the outdoor temperature was between 0 degrees and 5 degrees C. There were no incidences of death from cold when the minimum outdoor temperature had remained above 16 degrees C. Seventy-four percent of deaths from cold occurred during the winter months of December, January and February, and most of the remaining deaths occurred in March and November. There were no deaths from cold from June to August. More than half of all deaths from cold occurred from 3.00 a.m. to 9.00 a.m., with the peak occurring at 5.00 a.m. A blood alcohol concentration of over 2.5 mg/ml had often been found in those in their forties and fifties who had died from hypothermia, and autopsy had often revealed disorders of the liver, digestive system, and circulatory system. Chronic lesions of the liver, probably due to alcoholism, were found in many cases; few cases showed no evidence of alcoholism and these were significantly different from the former group.
PubMed ID
2055665 View in PubMed
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Adaptive dimensions of health research among indigenous Siberians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78876
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Mar-Apr;19(2):165-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
Snodgrass J Josh
Sorensen Mark V
Tarskaia Larissa A
Leonard William R
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403, USA. jjosh@uoregon.edu
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Mar-Apr;19(2):165-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Arctic Regions
Basal Metabolism
Biomedical research
Cold - adverse effects
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Culture
Geography
Humans
Life Style
Population Groups
Siberia
Time Factors
Abstract
Present evidence suggests that modern humans were the first hominid species to successfully colonize high-latitude environments (> or =55 degrees N). Given evidence for a recent (
PubMed ID
17286259 View in PubMed
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[Age dynamics of functional parameters in men in the Polar region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117718
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2013;26(4):647-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Iu G Solonin
E R Boiko
A L Markov
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2013;26(4):647-51
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone - analysis
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Heart Function Tests - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle strength
Population Dynamics
Postural Balance
Psychomotor Performance
Russia - epidemiology
Testosterone - analysis
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
In order to test the hypothesis about rapid involution of functional parameters in residents in the Polar region, the functional parameters in men of 20-69 years have been compared in cross-sectional study. There is a tendency to a steady decrease of height, strength indices, parameter of muscle working capacity, balancing of the body when standing on one leg, vital capacity, cardiac output, tolerance to hypoxemia, level of physical health, adrenocorticotropic hormone and testosterone levels and an increase of body mass index, index of coordination (impairment of motor coordination), time of visual-motor response, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, index of functional changes, insulin level. More pronounced decline of functions is observed in men after 50 years.
PubMed ID
24738254 View in PubMed
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Alcohol problems in conditions of the North.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12507
Source
Pages 593-595 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Korolenko, C.P.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Novosibirsk Medical Institute, Novosibirsk, USSR
Source
Pages 593-595 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Alcoholism - psychology
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Humans
Personality
Risk factors
Social Isolation
USSR
PubMed ID
3272694 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail
Source
Pages 269-271 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Areskog, N.H
Lassvik, C
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
Source
Pages 269-271 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - etiology
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Electrocardiography
Exercise Test
Humans
Male
Risk factors
PubMed ID
3272618 View in PubMed
Documents
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Arctic health research--what--why--how?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4372
Source
Pages 24-27 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Albrecht, C. E
Author Affiliation
Advace, North Carolina, USA
Source
Pages 24-27 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Environmental health - trends
Forecasting
Humans
Research
Social Isolation
PubMed ID
3272611 View in PubMed
Documents
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Source
Duodecim. 1989;105(5):391-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
F. Stenbäck
Source
Duodecim. 1989;105(5):391-5
Date
1989
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Research
PubMed ID
2656191 View in PubMed
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Are the circumpolar Inuit becoming obese?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78875
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Mar-Apr;19(2):181-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Young T K
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 3M7. kue.young@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Mar-Apr;19(2):181-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Arctic Regions
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Chronic Disease
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Geography
Humans
Inuits
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
This paper reviews the ethnographic, historical, and recent epidemiological evidence of obesity among the Inuit/Eskimo in the circumpolar region. The Inuit are clearly at higher risk for obesity than other populations globally, if "universal" measures based on body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference and criteria such as those of WHO are used. Inuit women in particular have very high mean waist circumference levels in international comparisons. Given the limited trend data, BMI-defined obesity is more common today than even as recently as three decades ago. Inuit are not immune from the health hazards associated with obesity. However, the "dose-response" curves for the impact of obesity on metabolic indicators such as plasma lipids and blood pressure are lower than in other populations. Long-term, follow-up studies are needed to determine the metabolic consequences and disease risks of different categories of obesity. At least in one respect, the higher relative sitting height among Inuit, obesity measures based on BMI may not be appropriate for the Inuit. Ultimately, it is important to go beyond simple anthropometry to more accurate determination of body composition studies, and also localization of body fat using imaging techniques such as ultrasound and computed tomography. Internationally, there is increasing recognition of the need for ethnospecific obesity criteria. Notwithstanding the need for better quality epidemiological data, there is already an urgent need for action in the design and evaluation of community-based health interventions, if the emerging epidemic of obesity and other chronic diseases are to be averted.
PubMed ID
17286260 View in PubMed
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Source
Public Health. 2001 Nov;115(6):367
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
F. Sim
P. Mackie
Source
Public Health. 2001 Nov;115(6):367
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Female
Great Britain
Heating
Humans
Male
Public Health
Seasons
PubMed ID
11781844 View in PubMed
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Asthma and low level air pollution in Helsinki.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16080
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1991 Sep-Oct;46(5):262-70
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Pönkä
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Helsinki City Health Department, Finland.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1991 Sep-Oct;46(5):262-70
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Emergencies
Finland
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Abstract
The effects of relatively low levels of air pollution and weather conditions on the number of patients who had asthma attacks and who were admitted to a hospital were studied in Helsinki during a 3-y period. The number of admissions increased during cold weather (n = 4,209), especially among persons who were of working age but not among children. Even after standardization for temperature, all admissions, including emergency ward admissions, were significantly correlated with ambient air concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and total suspended particulates (TSP). Regression analysis revealed that NO and O3 were most strongly associated with asthma problems. Effects of air pollutants and cold were maximal if they occurred on the same day, except for O3, which had a more pronounced effect after a 1-d lag. The associations between pollutants, low temperature, and admissions were most significant among adults of working age, followed by the elderly. Among children, only O3 and NO were significantly correlated with admissions. Levels of pollutants were fairly low, the long-term mean being 19.2 micrograms/m3 for SO2, 38.6 micrograms/m3 for NO2, 22.0 micrograms/m3 or O3, and 1.3 mg/m3 for CO. In contrast, the mean concentration of TSP was high (76.3 micrograms/m3), and the mean temperature was low (+ 4.7 degrees C). These results suggest that concentrations of pollutants lower than those given as guidelines in many countries may increase the incidence of asthma attacks.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Environ Health. 1994 May-Jun;49(3):205-68185393
PubMed ID
1953033 View in PubMed
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151 records – page 1 of 16.