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The absence of vaginal human papillomavirus 16 DNA in women who have not experienced sexual intercourse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218229
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1994 May;83(5 Pt 1):735-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
E. Rylander
L. Ruusuvaara
M W Almströmer
M. Evander
G. Wadell
Author Affiliation
Health Unit for School Children, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1994 May;83(5 Pt 1):735-7
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Coitus
DNA Probes, HPV
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Papillomaviridae - genetics - isolation & purification
Vagina - virology
Abstract
To determine whether young women who have not experienced sexual intercourse may harbor genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the vaginal-ectocervical mucosa.
We included 151 women, 10-25 years of age, attending two adolescent health care units (Stockholm and Uppsala) and one primary health care center (Umeå). The size of the hymenal orifice, use of tampons, and the habit of digital vaginal manipulation were registered. Samples of epithelial cells were collected from the vagina and analyzed for the presence of HPV using polymerase chain reaction.
One hundred thirty of 154 samples contained an adequate number of cells. Two samples were HPV 6 DNA-positive. None were HPV 16 DNA-positive. None of the women had external genital warts. In 84%, the hymenal opening was 15 mm or less. Forty-eight percent of the women used tampons during periods. Fifty-four percent had inserted their own finger into the vagina and in 23%, a boyfriend's finger had penetrated the vagina.
Human papillomavirus is rarely present vaginally in virginal women, even with the use of tampons or digital penetration.
PubMed ID
8164934 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Jan 8;133(1):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-8-2013
Author
Willy Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Institutt for sosiologi og samfunnsgeografi Universitetet i Oslo, Norway. willy.pedersen@sosgeo.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Jan 8;133(1):33-6
Date
Jan-8-2013
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology
Coitus
Depression - epidemiology
Humans
Loneliness
Norway
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Social Support
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abstinence from alcohol has been associated with higher mortality than a moderate consumption of alcohol. However, there is evidence to indicate that the abstainers constitute a select group which is exposed to various psychosocial risk factors.
A population-based sample (N=1978) from the study Young in Norway - longitudinal was followed with repeated surveys from their teens until approaching the age of 30. This data set was linked to various registries. The collection of data included their use of alcohol, social integration and symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as sexual behaviour. Data on receipt of social benefits were collected from registries.
At age 21, altogether 211 individuals (10.7%) had remained abstinent from alcohol throughout their entire lives. At age 28, their number had fallen to 93 individuals (4.7%). At age 21, abstinence was associated with weak networks of friends, loneliness and a higher likelihood of not yet having had a sexual debut. At age 28, the abstainers also reported a higher prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression. They were also more frequent recipients of social benefits.
Abstinence from alcohol in adulthood is associated with psychosocial problems and weak integration. These may introduce confounding factors in studies of the health effects of alcohol consumption.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 5;133(5):50123463056
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 5;133(5):50123463055
PubMed ID
23306990 View in PubMed
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Adolescent girls' sexual attitudes and opposite-sex relations in 1970 and in 1996.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195576
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2001 Mar;28(3):242-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
C. Magnusson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. cmn@psychology.su.se
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2001 Mar;28(3):242-52
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Age Factors
Attitude
Cohort Studies
Coitus - psychology
Female
Humans
Menarche - psychology
Self Concept
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
To describe changes in adolescent girls' sexual attitudes and relationships with boys between 1970 and 1996, particularly girls who had early onset of sexual intercourse. METHOD AND INSTRUMENT: The study includes two cohorts. The first is from the Swedish longitudinal research program, "Individual Development and Adaptation." This cohort included all eighth-grade girls (15-year-olds), 522 girls, in a mid-Swedish community in 1970. In 1996, the same instrument (Adjustment Screening Test) was administered to all eighth-grade girls (15-year-olds), 567 girls, in the same community. These girls make up the second cohort.
Girls were thinking and feeling similarly about sexual matters in 1970 and 1996. Furthermore, the same factors correlated with early sexual onset of intercourse in both cohorts, and the correlations were of about the same magnitudes. This suggests that sexuality has quite similar developmental implications in the lives of teenaged girls now as it had 25 years ago. There were, however, differences in the prevalence of opposite-sex relations. Compared with girls in 1970, girls in 1996 had had fewer sexual relationships and had postponed their sexual transition.
This study shows that perceptual, bodily, and behavioral maturation are positively related to each other. The girls with early onset of intercourse matured early both in 1970 and in 1996. They felt sexually more experienced than their age-mates, and they also aspired to be older.
PubMed ID
11226848 View in PubMed
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Adolescent sexual behavior during periods of increase and decrease in the abortion rate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150136
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Jul;114(1):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Kobra Falah-Hassani
Elise Kosunen
Rahman Shiri
Jukka Jokela
Arja Liinamo
Arja Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. kobra.falah.hassani@uta.fi
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Jul;114(1):79-86
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Coitus
Contraception Behavior
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
To study changes in adolescent sexual behavior in periods of increase (1994-2000) and decrease (2001-2007) in the abortion rate.
School surveys with self-administered questionnaires were carried out annually among eighth graders (mean age 14.8 years) and ninth graders (mean age 15.8 years) (N=286,665) in 1996/1997 and 2006/2007. Schools participated biennially. The proportions of respondents reporting noncoital (kissing, light petting, heavy petting) and coital (ever had sexual intercourse, intercourse at least 10 times, at least three partners) sexual experience and nonuse of contraception were studied.
Among adolescents, both coital and noncoital sexual experiences and the proportion of those not using contraception increased between 1996-1997 and 2000-2001 (P for trend
PubMed ID
19546762 View in PubMed
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Adolescent sexuality and its problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64564
Source
Ann Acad Med Singapore. 1995 Sep;24(5):736-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
M. Yang
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, National University Hospital, Singapore.
Source
Ann Acad Med Singapore. 1995 Sep;24(5):736-40
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Coitus
Contraception
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Sex Education
Sexual Behavior
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - transmission
Abstract
Adolescent sexual activity is increasing globally. Abstinence and a delay in the start of sexual intercourse may be the most effective methods in preventing the consequences of teenage sexual activity. However, these goals are seldom met. With the change in social norms, peer pressure and media influences; teenagers are engaging in premarital sex earlier. Family life education in countries like Sweden and Finland reduces teenage pregnancy and abortion. It is unrealistic to expect sexually active adolescents to stop their sexual activity. An effective contraceptive method will provide an alternative to prevent teenage pregnancy. Issues on compliance of contraceptive use, especially at the very outset of sexual activity should be addressed. Most of the problems associated with teenage pregnancy are now thought to be related to the social circumstances of the mother, the poor nutritional status before pregnancy and poor attendance at antenatal clinics. Risk-taking behaviour in this age group will also make them more prone to contracting sexually transmitted diseases. High risk groups should be screened and treated early. Contraceptive methods with protection against sexually transmitted diseases should be advised.
PubMed ID
8579322 View in PubMed
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Age at first experience of intercourse among Norwegian adolescents: a lifestyle perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12090
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1991;33(2):207-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
P. Kraft
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1991;33(2):207-13
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Coitus
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Incidence
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Behavior
Social Values
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Age at first intercourse among Norwegian adolescents was studied by means of survival analysis. The data stemmed from a nation-wide survey of 3000 Norwegian adolescents aged 17-19, yielding a response rate of 61.8%. Median age at first intercourse was 17.3 years among girls and 18.0 years among boys. By means of Cox regression analysis associations between age at onset of intercourse and some correlates were estimated. Age at first intercourse was significantly associated with educational aspirations, smoking behaviour, alcohol consumption, peer affiliation, and frequency of visiting a discotheque. These inter-relationships confirm that age at onset of intercourse comprise an important indicator of the lifestyle of an individual. In order to influence sexual behaviour of adolescents it may thus be appropriate to employ health promotion activities focusing upon environmental and structural factors, as a supplement to traditional methods of sex education.
PubMed ID
1887284 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Age at menarche and first sexual intercourse. A cross-sectional study of 17-year old Danish women].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207016
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Nov 3;159(45):6676-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-1997
Author
S B Larsen
J. Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Almen Medicin.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Nov 3;159(45):6676-9
Date
Nov-3-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Coitus
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Menarche
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The age at menarche and first intercourse was analyzed from data obtained from a questionnaire sent to 1500 17 year-old randomly selected Danish women (76% responded). The average age at menarche was 13.37 years (SD: 1.24). The median age at the time of the first intercourse was 16.6 years. Late sexual debut was observed for girls who were relatively old at menarche and for those with a higher level of education. Apparently the age at menarche and at first sexual intercourse has not changed significantly in recent years.
PubMed ID
9411982 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age at time of first intercourse v. chronologic age as a basis for Pap smear screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243029
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Jul 15;127(2):127-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1982
Author
V C Wright
M A Riopelle
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Jul 15;127(2):127-31
Date
Jul-15-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Carcinoma in Situ - diagnosis - epidemiology
Coitus
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Ontario
Papanicolaou test
Time Factors
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
The Walton Report on cervical cancer screening programs recently recommended a new program for screening for cervical cancer based on chronologic age, calling for 3- and 5-year intervals between examinations. It recommended that such examinations be discontinued after 60 years of age. In a group of 232 routinely examined women (aged 18 to 47 years) in whom cervical intraepithelial neoplasia developed the timing of onset of the disease and the implications for screening were studied. The average age at the time of diagnosis was 30 years; in 20% of the patients the diagnosis had been made after age 35. The screening program recommended in the Walton Report would have been effective in diagnosing most cases (80%) in this sample by age 35 and all by age 60. However, when the patients were grouped according to age at the time of first intercourse, the diagnosis had been made after age 35 in only 13% of those who started having intercourse at age 15 to 17 years, 20% of those who started at age 18 to 19 years and 33% of those who started at age 20 years of later. When the times of diagnosis were expressed by number of years of intercourse the distributions became uniform in the same three groups; in 72% of all the patients the diagnosis had been made within the first 15 years of intercourse, in 88% it had been made within 20 years and in 100% it had been made by 30 years. These data suggest that a program based on number of years of intercourse may be more uniform and more efficient than one based on chronologic age, and that cytologic examinations should be concentrated during the time when most cases develop -- 6 to 20 years after the time of first intercourse.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1960 Dec 3;174(14):1847-5112259009
Cites: Lancet. 1965 Oct 16;2(7416):756-94157809
Cites: Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 1966 Feb;6(1):30-45218307
Cites: Cancer Chemother Rep. 1966 Mar;50(3):163-705910392
Cites: Am J Public Health Nations Health. 1967 May;57(5):840-76067208
Cites: Cancer Res. 1967 Apr;27(4):603-176025727
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1967 Jul 15;98(6):792-96027707
Cites: Cancer. 1968 Apr;21(4):663-715643761
Cites: Cancer Res. 1968 Apr;28(4):695-7065649059
Cites: Cancer. 1969 Feb;23(2):458-605764984
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1969 May;89(5):547-545818824
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1969 Oct 1;105(3):386-935810787
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1976 Sep 1;126(1):110-5961736
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1976 Oct 15;126(4):418-21984102
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1978 Jul 15;131(6):620-3581144
Cites: Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 1980 Nov 19;210(1180):411-216109302
Cites: Acta Cytol. 1965 Jul-Sep;9:314-614336995
PubMed ID
7093858 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age of partners at first intercourse among Danish males and females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230032
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 1989 Oct;18(5):449-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
H. Wielandt
J. Boldsen
B. Jeune
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Department of Social Medicine, Odense C., Denmark.
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 1989 Oct;18(5):449-54
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Coitus
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Psychosexual Development
Abstract
In 1984-1985 a representative sample of 286 Danish women (response rate = 75.3%) and 336 Danish men (response rate = 77.8%), ages 16-20 years, was interviewed about their first sexual intercourse. A cumulative frequency function was constructed and the median age at sexual debut was estimated at 16.8 years for both male and female. Generally the age difference between the partners at first intercourse was only a few years. However, the young women almost never reported their first sexual partner as younger than themselves. A cross-check was made of the information given by two homogeneous subsamples of the 47 young women and 80 young men who had their first sexual intercourse with a partner who was also a debutant. Self-reported age among the males differed significantly from the age of the first sexual partner as stated by the females in these subsamples. Therefore, there is bias in the reporting of age of partner at first intercourse. As the self-reported age at first sexual intercourse by young women agrees with the age of first partner as stated by young men, the bias seems to manifest itself predominantly as a systematic misreporting in the age of male partners of debutant females.
PubMed ID
2818174 View in PubMed
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Age of sexual debut related to life-style and reproductive health factors in a group of Swedish teenage girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11242
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1996 May;75(5):484-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
A. Andersson-Ellström
L. Forssman
I. Milsom
Author Affiliation
Center for Public Health Research, Karstad, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1996 May;75(5):484-9
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Adolescent
Age Factors
Coitus
Contraception Behavior
Female
Humans
Life Style
Motivation
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Behavior
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM. To compare life-style and reproductive health care factors in girls with a coitus debut or = 15 years and 17 girls (19.3%) had not had their sexual debut on completion of this study. Girls with an early sexual debut had a greater number of sexually transmitted diseases (p two brothers and/or sisters (p
PubMed ID
8677776 View in PubMed
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182 records – page 1 of 19.