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A 3-year follow-up of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme for back and neck pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61395
Source
Pain. 2005 Jun;115(3):273-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Jensen IB
Bergström G
Ljungquist T
Bodin L
Author Affiliation
Section for Personal Injury Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, Box 127 18, 112 94 Stockholm, Sweden. irene.jensen@cns.ki.se
Source
Pain. 2005 Jun;115(3):273-83
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain - economics - rehabilitation
Cognitive Therapy
Comparative Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - economics - rehabilitation
Pensions
Physical Therapy (Specialty) - economics - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Rehabilitation - economics - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of a behavioural medicine rehabilitation programme and the outcome of its two main components, compared to a 'treatment-as-usual' control group. The study employed a 4 x 5 repeated-measures design with four groups and five assessment periods during a 3-year follow-up. The group studied consisted of blue-collar and service/care workers on sick leave, identified in a nationwide health insurance scheme in Sweden. After inclusion, the subjects were randomised to one of the four conditions: behaviour-oriented physiotherapy (PT), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), behavioural medicine rehabilitation consisting of PT+CBT (BM) and a 'treatment-as-usual' control group (CG). Outcome variables were sick leave, early retirement and health-related quality of life. A cost-effectiveness analysis, comparing the programmes, was made. The results showed, consistently, the full-time behavioural medicine programme being superior to the three other conditions. The strongest effect was found on females. Regarding sick leave, the mean difference in the per-protocol analysis between the BM programme and the control group was 201 days, thus reducing sick leave by about two-thirds of a working year. Rehabilitating women has a substantial impact on costs for production losses, whereas rehabilitating men seem to be effortless with no significant effect on either health or costs. In conclusion, a full-time behavioural medicine programme is a cost-effective method for improving health and increasing return to work in women working in blue-collar or service/care occupations and suffering from back/neck pain.
PubMed ID
15911154 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and commitment group therapy for health anxiety--results from a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108574
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2013 Jun;27(5):461-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
T. Eilenberg
L. Kronstrand
P. Fink
L. Frostholm
Author Affiliation
The Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Barthsgade 5.1, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2013 Jun;27(5):461-8
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypochondriasis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Questionnaires
Abstract
Health anxiety (or hypochondriasis) is prevalent, may be persistent and disabling for the sufferers and associated with high societal costs. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a new third-wave behavioral cognitive therapy that has not yet been tested in health anxiety. 34 consecutive Danish patients with severe health anxiety were referred from general practitioners or hospital departments and received a ten-session ACT group therapy. Patients were followed up by questionnaires for 6 months. There were significant reductions in health anxiety, somatic symptoms and emotional distress at 6 months compared to baseline: a 49% reduction in health anxiety (Whiteley-7 Index), a 47% decrease in emotional distress (SCL-8), and a 40% decrease in somatic symptoms (SCL-90R Somatization Subscale). The patients' emotional representations and perception of the consequences of their illness (IPQ) improved significantly, and 87% of the patients were very or extremely satisfied with the treatment.
PubMed ID
23871841 View in PubMed
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Access to and waiting time for psychiatrist services in a Canadian urban area: a study in real time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131782
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):474-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Elliot M Goldner
Wayne Jones
Mei Lan Fang
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia. egoldner@sfu.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):474-80
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Cognitive Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To obtain improved quality information regarding psychiatrist waiting times by use of a novel methodological approach in which accessibility and wait times are determined by a real-time patient referral procedure.
An adult male patient with depression was referred for psychiatric assessment by a family physician. Consecutive calls were made to all registered psychiatrists (n = 297) in Vancouver. A semistructured call procedure was used to collect information about the psychiatrists' availability for receipt of this and similar referrals, identify factors that affect psychiatrist accessibility, and determine the availability of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT).
Efforts were made to contact 297 psychiatrists and 230 (77%) were reached successfully. Among the 230 psychiatrists contacted, 160 (70%) indicated that they were unable to accept the referral. Although 70 (30%) indicated that they might be able to consider accepting a referral, 64 (91% of those who would consider accepting the referral) indicated that they would need to review detailed, written referral information and could not provide estimates of the length of wait times if the patient was to be accepted. Only 6 (3% of the 230 psychiatrists contacted) offered immediate appointment times and their wait times ranged from 4 to 55 days. When asked whether they could provide CBT, most (56%) psychiatrists in clinical practice answered maybe.
Substantial barriers exist for family physicians attempting to refer patients for psychiatric referral. Consolidated efforts to improve access to psychiatric assessment are needed.
PubMed ID
21878158 View in PubMed
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[A cognitive approach to overutilization of health services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192488
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 24;98(43):4745-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-2001

Acquiring and refining CBT skills and competencies: which training methods are perceived to be most effective?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148955
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2009 Oct;37(5):571-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
James Bennett-Levy
Freda McManus
Bengt E Westling
Melanie Fennell
Author Affiliation
University of Sydney and Southern Cross University, Australia. james.bennettlevy@ncahs. health.nsw.gov.au
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2009 Oct;37(5):571-83
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognitive Therapy - education
Curriculum
Education
Female
Humans
Male
Mentors - psychology
Middle Aged
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
A theoretical and empirical base for CBT training and supervision has started to emerge. Increasingly sophisticated maps of CBT therapist competencies have recently been developed, and there is evidence that CBT training and supervision can produce enhancement of CBT skills. However, the evidence base suggesting which specific training techniques are most effective for the development of CBT competencies is lacking.
This paper addresses the question: What training or supervision methods are perceived by experienced therapists to be most effective for training CBT competencies?
120 experienced CBT therapists rated which training or supervision methods in their experience had been most effective in enhancing different types of therapy-relevant knowledge or skills.
In line with the main prediction, it was found that different training methods were perceived to be differentially effective. For instance, reading, lectures/talks and modelling were perceived to be most useful for the acquisition of declarative knowledge, while enactive learning strategies (role-play, self-experiential work), together with modelling and reflective practice, were perceived to be most effective in enhancing procedural skills. Self-experiential work and reflective practice were seen as particularly helpful in improving reflective capability and interpersonal skills.
The study provides a framework for thinking about the acquisition and refinement of therapist skills that may help trainers, supervisors and clinicians target their learning objectives with the most effective training strategies.
PubMed ID
19703329 View in PubMed
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Adult attachment insecurity and narrative processes in psychotherapy: an exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139033
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):498-511
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sarah I F Daniel
Author Affiliation
The University Clinic, Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. sarah@selskabet.org
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):498-511
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bulimia Nervosa - psychology - therapy
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Narration
Object Attachment
Observer Variation
Psychoanalytic Therapy - methods
Scandinavia
Abstract
Different types of client attachment insecurity may affect the psychotherapeutic process in distinct ways. This exploratory study compared the in-session discourse of clients with dismissing and preoccupied attachment states of mind on Adult Attachment Interviews conducted prior to therapy in the context of a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. In a subsample of six sessions from each of eight therapy dyads, preoccupied clients were found to talk more and have longer speaking turns than dismissing clients, who in turn generated more pauses. Using the Narrative Processes Coding System, preoccupied clients were found to show more narrative initiative; whereas, differences in terms of narrative process modes were not as clearly interpretable. Contrary to expectations, the two insecure states of mind were equally different in the relationship-focused psychoanalytic therapy and in the symptom-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy. Suggestions for further investigations of the in-session discourse of clients with different attachment states of mind are given.
PubMed ID
21110406 View in PubMed
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Affect school and script analysis versus basic body awareness therapy in the treatment of psychological symptoms in patients with diabetes and high HbA1c concentrations: two study protocols for two randomized controlled trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279373
Source
Trials. 2016 Apr 27;17(1):221
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-2016
Author
Eva O Melin
Ralph Svensson
Sven-Åke Gustavsson
Agneta Winberg
Ewa Denward-Olah
Mona Landin-Olsson
Hans O Thulesius
Source
Trials. 2016 Apr 27;17(1):221
Date
Apr-27-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Body Image
Clinical Protocols
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Mind-Body Therapies - methods
Patient Education as Topic
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Design
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Depression is linked with alexithymia, anxiety, high HbA1c concentrations, disturbances of cortisol secretion, increased prevalence of diabetes complications and all-cause mortality. The psycho-educational method 'affect school with script analysis' and the mind-body therapy 'basic body awareness treatment' will be trialled in patients with diabetes, high HbA1c concentrations and psychological symptoms. The primary outcome measure is change in symptoms of depression. Secondary outcome measures are changes in HbA1c concentrations, midnight salivary cortisol concentration, symptoms of alexithymia, anxiety, self-image measures, use of antidepressants, incidence of diabetes complications and mortality.
Two studies will be performed. Study I is an open-labeled parallel-group study with a two-arm randomized controlled trial design. Patients are randomized to either affect school with script analysis or to basic body awareness treatment. According to power calculations, 64 persons are required in each intervention arm at the last follow-up session. Patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes were recruited from one hospital diabetes outpatient clinic in 2009. The trial will be completed in 2016. Study II is a multicentre open-labeled parallel-group three-arm randomized controlled trial. Patients will be randomized to affect school with script analysis, to basic body awareness treatment, or to treatment as usual. Power calculations show that 70 persons are required in each arm at the last follow-up session. Patients with type 2 diabetes will be recruited from primary care. This study will start in 2016 and finish in 2023. For both studies, the inclusion criteria are: HbA1c concentration =62.5 mmol/mol; depression, alexithymia, anxiety or a negative self-image; age 18-59 years; and diabetes duration =1 year. The exclusion criteria are pregnancy, severe comorbidities, cognitive deficiencies or inadequate Swedish. Depression, anxiety, alexithymia and self-image are assessed using self-report instruments. HbA1c concentration, midnight salivary cortisol concentration, blood pressure, serum lipid concentrations and anthropometrics are measured. Data are collected from computerized medical records and the Swedish national diabetes and causes of death registers.
Whether the "affect school with script analysis" will reduce psychological symptoms, increase emotional awareness and improve diabetes related factors will be tried, and compared to "basic body awareness treatment" and treatment as usual.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01714986.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27121185 View in PubMed
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An effectiveness study of a culturally enriched school-based CBT anxiety prevention program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133264
Source
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2011;40(4):618-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lynn D Miller
Aviva Laye-Gindhu
Joanna L Bennett
Yan Liu
Stephenie Gold
John S March
Brent F Olson
Vanessa E Waechtler
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4. anxiety@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2011;40(4):618-29
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - ethnology - prevention & control
Canada
Child
Cognitive Therapy
Culture
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Male
School Health Services
Sex Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Anxiety disorders are prevalent in the school-aged population and are present across cultural groups. Scant research exists on culturally relevant prevention and intervention programs for mental health problems in the Aboriginal populations. An established cognitive behavioral program, FRIENDS for Life, was enriched to include content that was culturally relevant to Aboriginal students. Students (N = 533), including 192 students of Aboriginal background, participated in the cluster randomized control study. Data were collected three times over 1 year. A series of multilevel models were conducted to examine the effect of the culturally enriched FRIENDS program on anxiety. These analyses revealed that the FRIENDS program did not effectively reduce anxiety for the total sample or for Aboriginal children specifically. However, all students, regardless of intervention condition, Aboriginal status, or gender, reported a consistent decrease in feelings of anxiety over the 6-month study period.
PubMed ID
21722033 View in PubMed
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An empirical study of countertransference reactions toward patients with personality disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78017
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2007 May-Jun;48(3):225-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Rossberg Jan Ivar
Karterud Sigmund
Pedersen Geir
Friis Svein
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Division, Ullevaal University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, 0407 Oslo, Norway. j.i.rxssberg@medisin.uio.no
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2007 May-Jun;48(3):225-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognitive Therapy
Countertransference (Psychology)
Emotions
Female
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Personality Disorders - psychology - therapy
Psychotherapy, Group
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The study examined to what extent patients with cluster A + B personality disorders (PDs) evoked other countertransference reactions among psychotherapists compared with patients with cluster C PDs as well as the relationship between the different countertransference reactions and outcome. METHODS: A total of 11 therapists at the Department for Personality Psychiatry, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway, filled out the Feeling Word Checklist-58 (FWC-58), 2 weeks after admission and 2 weeks before discharge, for 71 patients admitted to the day treatment program. The patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorders (SCID-II). RESULTS: The study revealed that patients with cluster A + B PDs evoked more negative and less positive countertransference reactions than those with cluster C PDs. The psychotherapists varied significantly more in their reported countertransference reactions toward patients with cluster A + B PDs than toward those with cluster C PDs. Patients who dropped out of treatment evoked significantly more negative countertransference reactions after 2 weeks than patients who completed the treatment. In addition, the study revealed strong correlations between countertransference feelings and change during the treatment. CONCLUSIONS: This empirical study confirms clinical narratives on specified relationships between countertransference reactions, different PDs, and treatment course.
PubMed ID
17445515 View in PubMed
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An explorative analysis of the recruitment of patients to a randomised controlled trial in adolescents with dental anxiety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272667
Source
Swed Dent J. 2014;38(1):47-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulla Wide Boman
Anders G Broberg
Larisa Krekmanova
Marie Staberg
Carina Svensson
Agneta Robertson
Source
Swed Dent J. 2014;38(1):47-54
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cognitive Therapy
Dental Anxiety - psychology - therapy
Dental Care - methods - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Motivation
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Selection
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are considered to provide the most reliable evidence on the efficacy of interventions. The aim of this study was to describe the recruitment process of an RCT study set up to evaluate a Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) intervention programme for adolescent patients with dental anxiety (DA). The participants were recruited from a consecutive sample of adolescent patients (12-19 yrs old) referred for DA to a specialised pediatric dentistry clinic. Age, gender, and reason for referral were recorded for the possible eligible patients as part of the drop-out analysis of the recruitment process. Participants were then randomized to the intervention (CBT integrated with dental treatment) or control (adapted dental treatment) condition. In the recruitment process, 138 possible eligible patients met inclusion criteria, of these 55 were enrolled, 44 declined participation and 39 patients were excluded.The patients enrolled in the RCT did not differ from the non-participants with regard to age, gender or cause of referral. As a result of difficulties in the recruitment process, the study period was extended. The considerable proportion of non-participants as evident from the recruitment process may pose a threat to the external validity of the clinical trial. From a clinical perspective, the reasons for the lack of motivation to participate in behavioural interventions and the failure to appear warrant further investigation.
PubMed ID
26995811 View in PubMed
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289 records – page 1 of 29.