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A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264224
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-2015
Author
Tiia Ngandu
Jenni Lehtisalo
Alina Solomon
Esko Levälahti
Satu Ahtiluoto
Riitta Antikainen
Lars Bäckman
Tuomo Hänninen
Antti Jula
Tiina Laatikainen
Jaana Lindström
Francesca Mangialasche
Teemu Paajanen
Satu Pajala
Markku Peltonen
Rainer Rauramaa
Anna Stigsdotter-Neely
Timo Strandberg
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Hilkka Soininen
Miia Kivipelto
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Date
Jun-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Double-Blind Method
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk assessment
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Modifiable vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors have been associated with dementia risk in observational studies. In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial, we aimed to assess a multidomain approach to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
In a double-blind randomised controlled trial we enrolled individuals aged 60-77 years recruited from previous national surveys. Inclusion criteria were CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia) Dementia Risk Score of at least 6 points and cognition at mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. We randomly assigned participants in a 1:1 ratio to a 2 year multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring), or a control group (general health advice). Computer-generated allocation was done in blocks of four (two individuals randomly allocated to each group) at each site. Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was change in cognition as measured through comprehensive neuropsychological test battery (NTB) Z score. Analysis was by modified intention to treat (all participants with at least one post-baseline observation). This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01041989.
Between Sept 7, 2009, and Nov 24, 2011, we screened 2654 individuals and randomly assigned 1260 to the intervention group (n=631) or control group (n=629). 591 (94%) participants in the intervention group and 599 (95%) in the control group had at least one post-baseline assessment and were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. Estimated mean change in NTB total Z score at 2 years was 0·20 (SE 0·02, SD 0·51) in the intervention group and 0·16 (0·01, 0·51) in the control group. Between-group difference in the change of NTB total score per year was 0·022 (95% CI 0·002-0·042, p=0·030). 153 (12%) individuals dropped out overall. Adverse events occurred in 46 (7%) participants in the intervention group compared with six (1%) participants in the control group; the most common adverse event was musculoskeletal pain (32 [5%] individuals for intervention vs no individuals for control).
Findings from this large, long-term, randomised controlled trial suggest that a multidomain intervention could improve or maintain cognitive functioning in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
Academy of Finland, La Carita Foundation, Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation, Juho Vainio Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Finnish Social Insurance Institution, Ministry of Education and Culture, Salama bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation, Axa Research Fund, EVO funding for University Hospitals of Kuopio, Oulu, and Turku and for Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Oulu City Hospital, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and af Jochnick Foundation.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Neurol. 2015 May;11(5):24825799934
PubMed ID
25771249 View in PubMed
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3 Tesla MRI-detected brain lesions after pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation: results of the MACPAF study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121377
Source
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2013 Jan;24(1):14-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Karl Georg Haeusler
Lydia Koch
Juliane Herm
Ute A Kopp
Peter U Heuschmann
Matthias Endres
Heinz-Peter Schultheiss
Alexander Schirdewan
Jochen B Fiebach
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. georg.haeusler@charite.de
Source
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2013 Jan;24(1):14-21
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - pathology - surgery
Brain Ischemia - etiology - pathology
Catheter Ablation - adverse effects
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Heart Conduction System - surgery
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Postoperative Complications - etiology - pathology
Pulmonary Veins - pathology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Left atrial catheter ablation (LACA) is an established therapeutic approach to abolish symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF).
Based on the prospective MACPAF study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01061931) we report the rate of ischemic brain lesions postablation and their impact on cognitive function.
Patients with symptomatic paroxysmal AF were randomized to LACA using the Arctic Front® or the HD Mesh Ablator® catheter. All patients underwent brain MRI at 3 Tesla, neurological, and neuropsychological examinations within 48 hours prior and after the ablation procedure.
There was no clinically evident stroke in 37 patients (mean age 62.4 ± 8.4 years; 41% female; median CHADS2 score 1 [IQR 0-2]) after LACA but high-resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) detected new ischemic lesions in 15 (41%) patients after LACA. Four (27%) of the HD Mesh Ablator® patients and 11 (50%) of the Arctic Front® patients suffered a silent ischemic lesion (P = 0.19). In these 15 patients, there was a nonsignificant trend toward lower cardiac ejection fraction (P = 0.07) and AF episodes during LACA (P = 0.09), while activated clotting time levels, number of energy applications, periprocedural electrocardioversion or CHADS(2) score had no impact. Lesion volumes varied from 5 to 150 mm(3) and 1 to 5 lesions were detected per patient. However, acute brain lesions had no effect on cognitive performance immediately after LACA. Of the DWI lesions postablation 82% were not detectable on FLAIR images 6-9 months postablation.
According to 3 Tesla high-resolution DWI, ischemic brain lesions after LACA were common but not associated with impaired cognitive function after the ablation procedure.
Notes
Comment In: J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2013 Jan;24(1):22-323130591
PubMed ID
22913568 View in PubMed
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A 3-year clinical follow-up of adult patients with 3243A>G in mitochondrial DNA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82145
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2006
Author
Majamaa-Voltti K A M
Winqvist S.
Remes A M
Tolonen U.
Pyhtinen J.
Uimonen S.
Kärppä M.
Sorri M.
Peuhkurinen K.
Majamaa K.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. kirsi.majamaa-voltti@oulu.fi
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Date
May-23-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cognition Disorders - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - genetics
Disease Progression
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Electroencephalography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - genetics
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - genetics - ultrasonography
Lactates - blood
MELAS Syndrome - genetics - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mitochondria, Muscle - metabolism
Mosaicism
Neuropsychological Tests
Point Mutation
Pyruvates - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To follow the clinical course of patients with the mitochondrial DNA mutation 3243A>G for 3 years. METHODS: Thirty-three adult patients with the 3243A>G mutation entered a 3-year follow-up study. They were clinically evaluated annually, audiometry was performed, and samples were drawn for the analysis of blood chemistry and mutation heteroplasmy in leukocytes. Holter recording was performed three times during the follow-up and echocardiography, neuropsychological assessment, and quantitative EEG and brain imaging conducted at entry and after 3 years. RESULTS: The incidence of new neurologic events was low during the 3-year follow-up. Sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) progressed, left ventricular wall thickness increased, mean alpha frequency in the occipital and parietal regions decreased, and the severity of disease index (modified Rankin score) progressed significantly. The rate of SNHI progression correlated with mutation heteroplasmy in muscle. The increase in left ventricular wall thickness was seen almost exclusively in diabetic patients. Seven patients died during the follow-up, and they were generally more severely affected than those who survived. CONCLUSIONS: Significant changes in the severity of disease, sensorineural hearing impairment, left ventricular hypertrophy, and quantitative EEG were seen in adult patients with 3243A>G during the 3-year follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2007 Jan 9;68(2):163-417210904
PubMed ID
16717204 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme for back and neck pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61395
Source
Pain. 2005 Jun;115(3):273-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Jensen IB
Bergström G
Ljungquist T
Bodin L
Author Affiliation
Section for Personal Injury Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, Box 127 18, 112 94 Stockholm, Sweden. irene.jensen@cns.ki.se
Source
Pain. 2005 Jun;115(3):273-83
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain - economics - rehabilitation
Cognitive Therapy
Comparative Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - economics - rehabilitation
Pensions
Physical Therapy (Specialty) - economics - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Rehabilitation - economics - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of a behavioural medicine rehabilitation programme and the outcome of its two main components, compared to a 'treatment-as-usual' control group. The study employed a 4 x 5 repeated-measures design with four groups and five assessment periods during a 3-year follow-up. The group studied consisted of blue-collar and service/care workers on sick leave, identified in a nationwide health insurance scheme in Sweden. After inclusion, the subjects were randomised to one of the four conditions: behaviour-oriented physiotherapy (PT), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), behavioural medicine rehabilitation consisting of PT+CBT (BM) and a 'treatment-as-usual' control group (CG). Outcome variables were sick leave, early retirement and health-related quality of life. A cost-effectiveness analysis, comparing the programmes, was made. The results showed, consistently, the full-time behavioural medicine programme being superior to the three other conditions. The strongest effect was found on females. Regarding sick leave, the mean difference in the per-protocol analysis between the BM programme and the control group was 201 days, thus reducing sick leave by about two-thirds of a working year. Rehabilitating women has a substantial impact on costs for production losses, whereas rehabilitating men seem to be effortless with no significant effect on either health or costs. In conclusion, a full-time behavioural medicine programme is a cost-effective method for improving health and increasing return to work in women working in blue-collar or service/care occupations and suffering from back/neck pain.
PubMed ID
15911154 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study of 91 hyperactive school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255426
Source
J Am Acad Child Psychiatry. 1972 Jul;11(3):595-610
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1972

A 10-year follow-up review of patients who underwent Leksell's posteroventral pallidotomy for Parkinson disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71973
Source
J Neurosurg. 2001 Apr;94(4):552-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
M I Hariz
A T Bergenheim
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeå. marwan.hariz@neuro.umu.se
Source
J Neurosurg. 2001 Apr;94(4):552-8
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antiparkinson Agents - therapeutic use
Cognition
Dopamine Agents - therapeutic use
Dopamine Agonists - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Globus Pallidus - surgery
Humans
Levodopa - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Parkinson Disease - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology - surgery
Recurrence
Abstract
OBJECT: The clinical condition of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) who had undergone posteroventral pallidotomy (PVP) between 1985 and 1990 was evaluated at a mean of 10 years postsurgery. These patients were part of a larger series described in the first paper on Leksell's PVP that was published in 1992. METHODS: Thirteen consecutive patients who had undergone pallidotomy at the University Hospital of Northern Sweden were tracked. Hospital and clinic records that had been updated regularly by the patients' various neurologists, geriatricians, and other clinicians were reviewed. Emphasis was placed on assessing the evolution of PD symptoms after surgery, and changes in the general health and social condition of the patients. The mean follow-up duration was 10.5 years (range 3-13.5 years). Five patients underwent a total of seven subsequent surgeries for their PD, 4 months to 11 years after the initial pallidotomy. The mean Hoehn and Yahr stage was 3 at the first surgery and 3.7 at the last follow-up review (p
PubMed ID
11302652 View in PubMed
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15q11.2 CNV affects cognitive, structural and functional correlates of dyslexia and dyscalculia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287813
Source
Transl Psychiatry. 2017 Apr 25;7(4):e1109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-25-2017
Author
M O Ulfarsson
G B Walters
O. Gustafsson
S. Steinberg
A. Silva
O M Doyle
M. Brammer
D F Gudbjartsson
S. Arnarsdottir
G A Jonsdottir
R S Gisladottir
G. Bjornsdottir
H. Helgason
L M Ellingsen
J G Halldorsson
E. Saemundsen
B. Stefansdottir
L. Jonsson
V K Eiriksdottir
G R Eiriksdottir
G H Johannesdottir
U. Unnsteinsdottir
B. Jonsdottir
B B Magnusdottir
P. Sulem
U. Thorsteinsdottir
E. Sigurdsson
D. Brandeis
A. Meyer-Lindenberg
H. Stefansson
K. Stefansson
Source
Transl Psychiatry. 2017 Apr 25;7(4):e1109
Date
Apr-25-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Deletion
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15 - genetics
Cognition - physiology
DNA Copy Number Variations - genetics
Developmental Disabilities - genetics
Dyscalculia - genetics
Dyslexia - genetics
Female
Functional Neuroimaging - methods - standards
Heterozygote
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Intellectual Disability - genetics
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - standards
Phenotype
Temporal Lobe - anatomy & histology - diagnostic imaging
Young Adult
Abstract
Several copy number variants have been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and these variants have been shown to also influence cognitive abilities in carriers unaffected by psychiatric disorders. Previously, we associated the 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion with specific learning disabilities and a larger corpus callosum. Here we investigate, in a much larger sample, the effect of the 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion on cognitive, structural and functional correlates of dyslexia and dyscalculia. We report that the deletion confers greatest risk of the combined phenotype of dyslexia and dyscalculia. We also show that the deletion associates with a smaller left fusiform gyrus. Moreover, tailored functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments using phonological lexical decision and multiplication verification tasks demonstrate altered activation in the left fusiform and the left angular gyri in carriers. Thus, by using convergent evidence from neuropsychological testing, and structural and functional neuroimaging, we show that the 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion affects cognitive, structural and functional correlates of both dyslexia and dyscalculia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28440815 View in PubMed
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A 15-Year Follow-Up Study of Sense of Humor and Causes of Mortality: The Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284817
Source
Psychosom Med. 2016 Apr;78(3):345-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Solfrid Romundstad
Sven Svebak
Are Holen
Jostein Holmen
Source
Psychosom Med. 2016 Apr;78(3):345-53
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Affect
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cognition
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infection - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Protective factors
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Perception
Wit and Humor as Topic
Abstract
Associations between the sense of humor and survival in relation to specific diseases has so far never been studied.
We conducted a 15-year follow-up study of 53,556 participants in the population-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Norway. Cognitive, social, and affective components of the sense of humor were obtained, and associations with all-cause mortality, mortality due to cardiovascular diseases (CVD), infections, cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases were estimated by hazard ratios (HRs).
After multivariate adjustments, high scores on the cognitive component of the sense of humor were significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality in women (HR = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.33-0.81), but not in men (HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.59-1.32). Mortality due to CVD was significantly lower in women with high scores on the cognitive component (HR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.15-0.47), and so was mortality due to infections both in men (HR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.09-0.74) and women (HR = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.04-0.76). The social and affective components of the sense of humor were not associated with mortality. In the total population, the positive association between the cognitive component of sense of humor and survival was present until the age of 85 years.
The cognitive component of the sense of humor is positively associated with survival from mortality related to CVD and infections in women and with infection-related mortality in men. The findings indicate that sense of humor is a health-protecting cognitive coping resource.
PubMed ID
26569539 View in PubMed
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The 39 item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39) revisited: implications for evidence based medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164059
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2007 Nov;78(11):1191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Peter Hagell
Carita Nygren
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, PO Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. Peter.Hagell@med.lu.se
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2007 Nov;78(11):1191-8
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antiparkinson Agents - therapeutic use
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Levodopa - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Parkinson Disease - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sick Role
Sweden
Abstract
The 39 item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39) is the most widely used patient reported rating scale in Parkinson's disease. However, several fundamental measurement assumptions necessary for confident use and interpretation of the eight PDQ-39 scales have not been fully addressed.
Postal survey PDQ-39 data from 202 people with Parkinson's disease (54% men; mean age 70 years) were analysed regarding psychometric properties using traditional and Rasch measurement methods.
Data quality was good (mean missing item responses, 2%) and there was general support for the legitimacy of summing items within scales without weighting or standardisation. Score reliabilities were adequate (Cronbach's alpha 0.72-0.95; test-retest 0.76-0.93). The validity of the current grouping of items into scales was not supported by scaling success rates (mean 56.2%), or factor and Rasch analyses. All scales represented more health problems than that experienced by the sample (mean floor effect 15%) and showed compromised score precision towards the less severe end.
Our results provide general support for the acceptability and reliability of the PDQ-39. However, they also demonstrate limitations that have implications for the use of the PDQ-39 in clinical research. The grouping of items into scales appears overly complex and the meaning of scale scores is unclear, which hampers their interpretation. Suboptimal targeting limits measurement precision and, therefore, probably also responsiveness. These observations have implications for the role of the PDQ-39 in clinical trials and evidence based medicine. PDQ-39 derived endpoints should be interpreted and selected cautiously, particularly regarding small but clinically important effects among people with less severe problems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17442762 View in PubMed
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2301 records – page 1 of 231.