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Abstention from filtered coffee reduces the concentrations of plasma homocysteine and serum cholesterol--a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53873
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Sep;74(3):302-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
B. Christensen
A. Mosdol
L. Retterstol
S. Landaas
D S Thelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. christensen@ioks.uio.no
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Sep;74(3):302-7
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cholesterol - blood
Coffee - adverse effects - metabolism
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Filtration
Folic Acid - blood - metabolism
Homocysteine - blood - drug effects - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - etiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Elevated concentrations of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and serum total cholesterol are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD). Previous studies showed that the consumption of very high doses of unfiltered coffee increases tHcy and total cholesterol. OBJECTIVE: A prospective intervention study was performed to assess the effects of coffee consumption on the concentrations of tHcy and total cholesterol by using doses and brewing methods common in southeastern Norway. DESIGN: The study was an unblinded, controlled trial with 191 healthy, nonsmoking, coffee-drinking volunteers aged 24-69 y randomly assigned to 3 groups who were asked to consume for 6 consecutive weeks no coffee, 1-3 cups (approximately 175-525 mL)/d, or > or =4 cups (approximately 700 mL)/d prepared in the manner to which they were accustomed. Blood samples were drawn when the subjects were randomly assigned and at 3 and 6 wk of the trial. Dietary data were collected by questionnaire. RESULTS: Ninety-seven percent of the participants reported being regular consumers of caffeinated filtered coffee. Abstention from coffee for 6 wk was associated with a decrease in the tHcy concentration of 1.08 micromol/L and a decrease in the total cholesterol concentration of 0.28 mmol/L in participants who had been drinking on average 4 cups of filtered coffee daily for the past year. Adjustments for several possible confounders did not alter the results. CONCLUSION: Abstention from filtered coffee in doses that are commonly consumed was associated with lower concentrations of tHcy and total cholesterol.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;75(5):948-9; author reply 949-5011976172
PubMed ID
11522552 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake: a risk factor for psoriasis in young and middle aged men?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12202
Source
BMJ. 1990 Mar 24;300(6727):780-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-1990
Author
K. Poikolainen
T. Reunala
J. Karvonen
J. Lauharanta
P. Kärkkäinen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1990 Mar 24;300(6727):780-3
Date
Mar-24-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - physiology
Alcoholic Intoxication - complications
Aspartate Aminotransferases - blood
Case-Control Studies
Coffee - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psoriasis - enzymology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To clarify the nature of the association between alcohol intake and psoriasis. DESIGN--Case-control study of men aged 19-50 with onset of skin disease in 1976 or later. SETTING--Outpatient clinics of the departments of dermatology of the university central hospitals in Helsinki, Oulu, and Tampere from September 1987 to April 1989. SUBJECTS--144 Patients with psoriasis and 285 unmatched controls with other skin diseases. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of clinical examination and self administered questionnaire assessing lifestyle and alcohol intake during two specified periods--namely, 12 months before the onset of skin disease and 12 months before the date of examination. RESULTS--Recalled mean alcohol intake before the onset of skin diseases was 42.9 g/day among the patients with psoriasis and 21.0 g/day among the controls. In logistic regression analysis psoriasis was associated with alcohol intake but not with coffee consumption, smoking, age, marital state, or social group. The odds ratio for psoriasis at an alcohol intake of 100 g/day compared with no intake was 2.2 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 3.9). The controls decreased their alcohol intake after the onset of the disease but the group with psoriasis did not. Analysis of serum enzyme values showed that gamma-glutamyltransferase activity was significantly correlated with alcohol intake (r = 0.35), the mean activity being 75.0 U/l among patients with psoriasis and 41.9 U/l among controls. CONCLUSIONS--Alcohol is a risk factor for psoriasis in young and middle aged men, and psoriasis may sustain drinking.
PubMed ID
1969757 View in PubMed
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Alcohol, tobacco and coffee consumption and the risk of pancreatic cancer: results from the Canadian Enhanced Surveillance System case-control project. Canadian Cancer Registries Epidemiology Research Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198820
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2000 Feb;9(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
P J Villeneuve
K C Johnson
A J Hanley
Y. Mao
Author Affiliation
Cancer Bureau, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Protection Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Canada. pvillene@uottawa.ca
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2000 Feb;9(1):49-58
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Coffee - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Population Surveillance
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The relationship between alcohol, tobacco and coffee consumption and pancreatic cancer was investigated using population-based case-control data obtained from eight Canadian provinces. Our findings are based on analyses performed on 583 histologically confirmed pancreatic cancer cases and 4813 controls. Questionnaire data were obtained directly from 76% of the cases. Male subjects with 35 or more cigarette pack-years had an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer relative to never smokers (OR= 1.46, 95% CI 1.00-2.14). Similarly, women reporting at least 23 cigarette pack-years of smoking had an odds ratio of 1.84 (95% CI 1.25-2.69). For the most part, consumption of total alcohol, wine, liquor and beer was not associated with pancreatic cancer. Coffee drinking was not related to pancreatic cancer. More work is needed to clarify the role of these and other potentially modifiable risk factors as a means to reduce the incidence of this disease for which treatment results remain disappointing.
PubMed ID
10777010 View in PubMed
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Are smoking and other lifestyle factors associated with female urinary incontinence? The Norwegian EPINCONT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9780
Source
BJOG. 2003 Mar;110(3):247-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Yngvild S Hannestad
Guri Rortveit
Anne Kjersti Daltveit
Steinar Hunskaar
Author Affiliation
Section for General Practice and Section for Preventive Medicine, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
BJOG. 2003 Mar;110(3):247-54
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Coffee - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects
Tea - adverse effects
Urinary Incontinence - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether modifiable lifestyle factors such as smoking, obesity, physical activity and intake of alcohol or caffeinated drinks were associated with urinary incontinence in women. DESIGN: Cross sectional population-based study. SETTING: The Norwegian Epidemiology of Incontinence in the County of Nord-Tr?ndelag (EPINCONT) Study is part of a large survey performed in a county in Norway during 1995-1997. POPULATION: Women >/=20 years (n = 34,755, 75% of the invited) attended the first part of the survey and received the questionnaire. There were 27,936 (80% of source population) women who completed the incontinence part of the questionnaire. METHODS: Questionnaire covering several health topics including urinary incontinence was received at a screening station. Logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for confounding and to establish associations with the different outcomes under investigation: any incontinence, severe incontinence and stress, urge and mixed subtypes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effect measure were odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Former and current smoking was associated with incontinence, but only for those who smoked more than 20 cigarettes per day. Severe incontinence was weakly associated with smoking regardless of number of cigarettes. The association between increasing body mass index and incontinence was strong and present for all subtypes. Increasing levels of low intensity physical activity had a weak and negative association with incontinence. Tea drinkers were at slightly higher risk for all types of incontinence. We found no important effects of high intensity physical activity, intake of alcohol or coffee. CONCLUSIONS: Several potentially modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with urinary incontinence. Highest odds ratios were found for body mass index, heavy smoking and tea drinking.
PubMed ID
12628262 View in PubMed
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Association between plasma fibrinogen concentration and five socioeconomic indices in the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221733
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1993 Feb 1;137(3):292-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1993
Author
T W Wilson
G A Kaplan
J. Kauhanen
R D Cohen
M. Wu
R. Salonen
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Human Population Laboratory, Western Consortium for Public Health, Berkeley, CA 94704-1011.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1993 Feb 1;137(3):292-300
Date
Feb-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coffee - adverse effects
Comorbidity
Educational Status
Fibrinogen - analysis
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Income
Leukocyte Count
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Occupations
Physical Fitness
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The association between five socioeconomic indices (lifetime occupation, education, income, ownership of material possessions, and childhood socioeconomic status) and plasma fibrinogen levels was investigated in middle-aged Finnish men who were part of the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. The Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study is based on a representative age-stratified sample of 2,682 men aged 42, 48, 54, and 60 years. The data were collected between 1984 and 1989. The present analysis is restricted to the 2,011 men for whom information on fibrinogen and all covariates was available. The covariates were alcohol consumption, body mass index, physical fitness, smoking, coffee consumption, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood leukocyte count, and prevalent disease (at least one sign of ischemic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, or previous stroke). An age-adjusted inverse association was found between levels of plasma fibrinogen and four of the five socioeconomic indices: current income, education, lifetime occupation status, and current material possessions. After adjustment for the covariates, the association persisted for education, current income, and lifetime occupation. Analysis of the joint effect of childhood and adult socioeconomic status indicated that those who were economically disadvantaged at both times had the highest fibrinogen levels, but the fibrinogen levels of those who were not poor as adults had no variation by childhood socioeconomic status.
PubMed ID
8452137 View in PubMed
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Association of boiled and filtered coffee with incidence of first nonfatal myocardial infarction: the SHEEP and the VHEEP study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53542
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Jun;253(6):653-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
N. Hammar
T. Andersson
L. Alfredsson
C. Reuterwall
T. Nilsson
J. Hallqvist
A. Knutsson
A. Ahlbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Jun;253(6):653-9
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Coffee - adverse effects
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Female
Food Handling
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of consumption of filtered and boiled coffee, on the incidence of first nonfatal myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Population-based case-control study. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: The study base consisted of the population 45-65/70 years-old in two Swedish counties, Stockholm and Västernorrland, 1992/93-94. In all, 1943 cases of first nonfatal myocardial infarction were identified. For each case one control was selected from the study base concurrently with disease incidence by matching the sex, age and place of residence of the case. Information about coffee consumption and other factors was obtained by mailed questionnaire and a medical examination. The participation rate was 85% amongst cases and 74% amongst controls. RESULTS: Men with a reported consumption of 7-9 dL filtered coffee per day showed an increased incidence of first myocardial infarction compared with consumers of 3 dL day-1 or less (RR: 1.32; 95% CI: 1.03-1.70). A consumption of at least 10 dL day-1 was associated with an RR of 1.93 (95% CI: 1.42-2.63) for filtered and 2.20 (95% CI: 1.17-4.15) for boiled coffee. Amongst women, no clear association was seen between consumption of filtered coffee and myocardial infarction but consumption of boiled coffee tended to be related to an increased incidence. Comparing subjects drinking boiled coffee with those drinking filtered coffee and adjusting for the amount consumed gave an increased incidence for boiled coffee amongst both men (RR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.07-1.80) and women (RR: 1.63; 95% CI: 1.04-2.56). CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of boiled coffee appears to increase the incidence of first nonfatal myocardial infarction. This increased incidence is consistent with randomized trials showing an adverse impact of boiled coffee on blood lipids.
PubMed ID
12755961 View in PubMed
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Bladder cancer: smoking, beverages and artificial sweeteners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252960
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Nov 16;111(10):1067-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-16-1974
Author
R W Morgan
M G Jain
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Nov 16;111(10):1067-70
Date
Nov-16-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beverages - adverse effects
Coffee - adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Sex Factors
Smoking
Sweetening Agents - adverse effects
Tea - adverse effects
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
A matched patient-control study of bladder cancer examined the relationship of the disease to occupation, smoking and intake of tea, coffee, cola, alcohol and artificial sweeteners.There was no association of disease with occupation for these patients. Heavy smoking gave relative risks of 6.37 and 4.36 for men and women respectively; there was evidence of a dose-response relationship. Tea and coffee intake did not increase the risk of disease nor did prolonged use of artificial sweeteners. Alcohol and cola intake increased the relative risk of bladder cancer among male smokers. There is some suggestion that smoking interacts with both alcohol and cola intake in the production of bladder cancer.
Notes
Cites: Nature. 1968 Oct 12;220(5163):178-95697890
Cites: Cancer Res. 1968 Nov;28(11):2375-894881507
Cites: Science. 1969 May 2;164(3879):568-95778009
Cites: Cancer Res. 1970 Mar;30(3):611-44246559
Cites: Nature. 1970 Jul 18;227(5255):296-75428205
Cites: Lancet. 1971 Jun 26;1(7713):1335-74103399
Cites: Cancer. 1972 May;29(5):1250-605021618
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1972 Sep;49(3):751-644647495
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1973 May 17;288(20):1040-34735262
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1958 Jan;20(1):37-5113502770
Cites: Cancer. 1963 Nov;16:1388-40714090576
Cites: AMA Arch Intern Med. 1956 Aug;98(2):129-3513354007
PubMed ID
4429932 View in PubMed
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Boiled coffee intake and subsequent risk for type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137087
Source
Epidemiology. 2011 May;22(3):418-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Vidar Hjellvik
Aage Tverdal
Hanne Strøm
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway. Vidar.Hjellvik@fhi.no
Source
Epidemiology. 2011 May;22(3):418-21
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Coffee - adverse effects
Databases, Factual
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Drinking
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Reference Values
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Many studies have found an inverse association between consumption of filtered coffee and incident type 2 diabetes. The effect of boiled coffee has been less studied.
Information on self-reported coffee consumption was available from health surveys conducted from 1985 to 1999. We estimated type 2 diabetes incidences from redeemed prescriptions of oral antidiabetic drugs in the period 1 January 2004 to 1 January 2008.
With less than 1 cup/day as the reference, the relative risks associated with 1-4, 5-8, and 9 or more cups of boiled coffee per day were 0.87 (95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.95), 0.65 (0.59-0.72), and 0.65 (0.57-0.74), respectively, after adjusting for confounders. The corresponding relative risks associated with other types of coffee (mainly filtered) were 0.84 (0.79-0.90), 0.67 (0.62-0.71) and 0.62 (0.56-0.68).
A moderate inverse association was found between consumption of both boiled and other types of coffee at the age of 40-45 years and the risk of being prescribed oral antidiabetic drugs 5-20 years later.
PubMed ID
21317784 View in PubMed
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Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1988 Jan 23;296(6617):291
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-23-1988
Author
B K Jacobsen
V. Hansen
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1988 Jan 23;296(6617):291
Date
Jan-23-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coffee - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - etiology
Norway
PubMed ID
3124918 View in PubMed
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Caffeine intake and delayed conception: a European multicenter study on infertility and subfecundity. European Study Group on Infertility Subfecundity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11090
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb 15;145(4):324-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1997
Author
F. Bolúmar
J. Olsen
M. Rebagliato
L. Bisanti
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Alicante University, Spain.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb 15;145(4):324-34
Date
Feb-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caffeine - adverse effects
Central Nervous System Stimulants - adverse effects
Coffee - adverse effects
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - etiology
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
The effects of caffeine consumption on delayed conception were evaluated in a European multicenter study on risk factors of infertility. Information was collected retrospectively on time of unprotected intercourse for the first pregnancy and the most recent waiting time episode in a randomly selected sample of 3,187 women aged 25-44 years from five European countries (Denmark, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Spain) between August 1991 and February 1993. The consumption of caffeinated beverages at the beginning of the waiting time was used to estimate daily caffeine intake, which was categorized as 0-100, 101-300, 301-500, and > or = 501 mg. Risk of subfecundity (> or = 9.5 months) and the fecundability ratio, respectively, were assessed by logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard analyses, adjusting for age, parity, smoking, alcohol consumption, frequency of intercourse, educational level, working status, use of oral contraceptives, and country. A significantly increased odds ratio (OR) of 1.45 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-2.04) for subfecundity in the first pregnancy was observed for women drinking more than 500 mg of caffeine per day, the effect being relatively stronger in smokers (OR = 1.56, 95% CI 0.92-2.63) than in nonsmokers (OR = 1.38, 95% CI 0.85-2.23). Women in the highest level of consumption had an increase in the time leading to the first pregnancy of 11% (hazard ratio = 0.90, 95% CI 0.78-1.03). These associations were observed consistently in all countries as well as for the most recent waiting time episode. The authors conclude that high levels of caffeine intake may delay conception among fertile women.
PubMed ID
9054236 View in PubMed
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118 records – page 1 of 12.