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A 15-year national follow-up: legislation is not enough to reduce the use of seclusion and restraint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162773
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;42(9):747-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Alice Keski-Valkama
Eila Sailas
Markku Eronen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Jouko Lönnqvist
Riittakerttu Kaltiala-Heino
Author Affiliation
Vanha Vaasa Hospital, PO Box 13, Vaasa, 65381 Finland. alice.keski-valkama@vvs.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;42(9):747-52
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Coercion
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Registries
Restraint, Physical - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Abstract
Seclusion and restraint are frequent but controversial coercive measures used in psychiatric treatment. Legislative efforts have started to emerge to control the use of these measures in many countries. In the present study, the nationwide trends in the use of seclusion and restraint were investigated in Finland over a 15-year span which was characterised by legislative changes aiming to clarify and restrict the use of these measures.
The data were collected during a predetermined week in 1990, 1991, 1994, 1998 and 2004, using a structured postal survey of Finnish psychiatric hospitals. The numbers of inpatients during the study weeks were obtained from the National Hospital Discharge Register.
The total number of the secluded and restrained patients declined as did the number of all inpatients during the study weeks, but the risk of being secluded or restrained remained the same over time when compared to the first study year. The duration of the restraint incidents did not change, but the duration of seclusion increased. A regional variation was found in the use of coercive measures.
Legislative changes solely cannot reduce the use of seclusion and restraint or change the prevailing treatment cultures connected with these measures. The use of seclusion and restraint should be vigilantly monitored and ethical questions should be under continuous scrutiny.
PubMed ID
17598058 View in PubMed
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Accumulated coercion and short-term outcome of inpatient psychiatric care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142568
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Lars Kjellin
Tuula Wallsten
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Psychiatric Research Centre, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. lars.kjellin@orebroll.se
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:53
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale - statistics & numerical data
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Discharge
Patient satisfaction
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The knowledge of the impact of coercion on psychiatric treatment outcome is limited. Multiple measures of coercion have been recommended. The aim of the study was to examine the impact of accumulated coercive incidents on short-term outcome of inpatient psychiatric care
233 involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patients were interviewed within five days of admission and at discharge or after maximum three weeks of care. Coercion was measured as number of coercive incidents, i.e. subjectively reported and in the medical files recorded coercive incidents, including legal status and perceived coercion at admission, and recorded and reported coercive measures during treatment. Outcome was measured both as subjective improvement of mental health and as improvement in professionally assessed functioning according to GAF. Logistic regression analyses were performed with patient characteristics and coercive incidents as independent and the two outcome measures as dependent variables
Number of coercive incidents did not predict subjective or assessed improvement. Patients having other diagnoses than psychoses or mood disorders were less likely to be subjectively improved, while a low GAF at admission predicted an improvement in GAF scores
The results indicate that subjectively and professionally assessed mental health short-term outcome of acute psychiatric hospitalisation are not predicted by the amount of subjectively and recorded coercive incidents. Further studies are needed to examine the short- and long-term effects of coercive interventions in psychiatric care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20584301 View in PubMed
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Afraid of medical care school-aged children's narratives about medical fear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147224
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria Forsner
Lilian Jansson
Anna Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden. mfr@du.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Coercion
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Narration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Pediatric Nursing
Play and Playthings - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Patient Relations
Social Support
Sweden
Thinking
Videotape Recording
Abstract
Fear can be problematic for children who come into contact with medical care. This study aimed to illuminate the meaning of being afraid when in contact with medical care, as narrated by children 7-11 years old. Nine children participated in the study, which applied a phenomenological hermeneutic analysis methodology. The children experienced medical care as "being threatened by a monster," but the possibility of breaking this spell of fear was also mediated. The findings indicate the important role of being emotionally hurt in a child's fear to create, together with the child, an alternate narrative of overcoming this fear.
PubMed ID
19931150 View in PubMed
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Ageing with telecare: care or coercion in austerity?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256617
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Jul;35(6):799-812
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Maggie Mort
Celia Roberts
Blanca Callén
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Lancaster University, UK Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología, Barcelona, Spain.
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Jul;35(6):799-812
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Aged
Aging - psychology
Coercion
Consumer Participation
Economic Recession
Geriatric Nursing - methods - standards
Health Services Misuse - prevention & control
Humans
Netherlands
Norway
Organizational Innovation
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Spain
Telemedicine - instrumentation - standards - utilization
Abstract
In recent years images of independence, active ageing and staying at home have come to characterise a successful old age in western societies. 'Telecare' technologies are heavily promoted to assist ageing-in-place and a nexus of demographic ageing, shrinking healthcare and social care budgets and technological ambition has come to promote the 'telehome' as the solution to the problem of the 'age dependency ratio'. Through the adoption of a range of monitoring and telecare devices, it seems that the normative vision of independence will also be achieved. But with falling incomes and pressure for economies of scale, what kind of independence is experienced in the telehome? In this article we engage with the concepts of 'technogenarians' and 'shared work' to illuminate our analysis of telecare in use. Drawing on European-funded research we argue that home-monitoring based telecare has the potential to coerce older people unless we are able to recognise and respect a range of responses including non-use and 'misuse' in daily practice. We propose that re-imagining the aims of telecare and redesigning systems to allow for creative engagement with technologies and the co-production of care relations would help to avoid the application of coercive forms of care technology in times of austerity.
PubMed ID
23094945 View in PubMed
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AIDS, public health and the law: a case of structural coupling?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7411
Source
Eur J Health Law. 1999 Sep;6(3):213-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999

Antecedents of role conflict in compliance-enhancing organizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97705
Source
Psychol Rep. 2009 Dec;105(3 Pt 2):1113-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Rudi Kirkhaug
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Science, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. rudi.kirkhaug@uit.no
Source
Psychol Rep. 2009 Dec;105(3 Pt 2):1113-25
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior Control - psychology
Coercion
Conflict (Psychology)
Cooperative Behavior
Data Collection
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Norway
Organizational Culture
Organizational Objectives
Personnel Loyalty
Police
Questionnaires
Role
Safety Management
Social Conformity
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Compliance-enhancing organizations such as the military and police are characterized by guiding and controlling employees, and they increasingly tend to control and restrict employees' behavior when exposed to external uncertainty. Restrictions on employees' behavior are intended to increase efficiency, safety, and combat readiness through reducing misunderstandings and conflicts. However, many writers have argued that the most natural reaction to external unpredictability and uncertainty is internal flexibility and utilizing the entire range of employees' qualifications. The question raised in this study is whether restrictions imply that employees feel they are subject to incompatible work conditions and are deprived of resources and opportunities to execute their everyday responsibilities and thereby experience role conflict. Hierarchical regression analyses performed on data from 71 police and 71 army officers showed that rules and routines that were perceived as restrictive or coercive better explained role conflict among employees than either leadership loyalty, commitment, and rules or routines that were perceived as enabling.
PubMed ID
20229915 View in PubMed
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Are xenotransplantation safeguards legally viable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179521
Source
Berkeley Technol Law J. 2001;16 Suppl:937-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
P S Florencio
E D Ramanathan
Author Affiliation
Proskauer Rose LLP, New York, NY, USA. pflorencio@proskauer.com
Source
Berkeley Technol Law J. 2001;16 Suppl:937-77
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Specimen Collection
Canada
Civil Rights
Coercion
Government Regulation
Humans
Infection Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Internationality
Jurisprudence
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence
Transplantation, Heterologous - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Abstract
Scientists agree on the need for robust public health safeguards to accompany the imminent introduction of xenotransplantation--clinical transplantation of animal tissue into humans. To protect society in the event of emerging infectious diseases, governments must devise a legally effective means of ensuring compliance with such safeguards. Neither consent law, the law of contracts, nor existing public health legislation can adequately enforce such compliance. Consent law serves as a mechanism of communicating the momentary waiver of legal rights, not as a durable enforcement doctrine. Because it would be essential for recipients personally to comply with public safety measures, the law of contracts would also be unable to compel compliance. Existing public health legislation would also likely be ineffective because it would need to be substantially amended to incorporate the heightened powers necessary for the periodic examination of asymptomatic xenotransplant recipients. Xenotransplantation-specific legislation would be a legally effective means of enforcing public health safeguards since it could require conforming behaviors and could impose monetary fines on those recipients who, having benefited from life-saving intervention, fail to comply. This Article argues that legislation implementing a post-xenotransplantation surveillance system should withstand constitutional scrutiny because it would not be discriminatory and because, although it would violate fundamental rights of recipients, such violations would be justified under existing constitutional doctrines.
PubMed ID
15212014 View in PubMed
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233 records – page 1 of 24.