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Assessing validity of a short food frequency questionnaire on present dietary intake of elderly Icelanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126210
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tinna Eysteinsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. tinnaey@landspitali.is
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil
Coffee
Dairy Products
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Iceland
Interviews as Topic
Male
Meat
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires - standards
Sex Factors
Tea
Vegetables
Abstract
Few studies exist on the validity of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) administered to elderly people. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a short FFQ on present dietary intake, developed specially for the AGES-Reykjavik Study, which includes 5,764 elderly individuals. Assessing the validity of FFQs is essential before they are used in studies on diet-related disease risk and health outcomes.
128 healthy elderly participants (74 y ± 5.7; 58.6% female) answered the AGES-FFQ, and subsequently filled out a 3-day weighed food record. Validity of the AGES-FFQ was assessed by comparing its answers to the dietary data obtained from the weighed food records, using Spearman's rank correlation, Chi-Square/Kendall's tau, and a Jonckheere-Terpstra test for trend.
For men a correlation = 0.4 was found for potatoes, fresh fruits, oatmeal/muesli, cakes/cookies, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee, tea and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.40-0.71). A lower, but acceptable, correlation was also found for raw vegetables (r = 0.33). The highest correlation for women was found for consumption of rye bread, oatmeal/muesli, raw vegetables, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee and tea (r = 0.40-0.61). An acceptable correlation was also found for fish topping/salad, fresh fruit, blood/liver sausage, whole-wheat bread, and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.28-0.37). Questions on meat/fish meals, cooked vegetables and soft drinks did not show a significant correlation to the reference method. Pearson Chi-Square and Kendall's tau showed similar results, as did the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test.
A majority of the questions in the AGES-FFQ had an acceptable correlation and may be used to rank individuals according to their level of intake of several important foods/food groups. The AGES-FFQ on present diet may therefore be used to study the relationship between consumption of several specific foods/food groups and various health-related endpoints gathered in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22413931 View in PubMed
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The association between parathyroid hormone, vitamin D and bone mineral density in 70-year-old Icelandic women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195328
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(12):1031-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
G. Sigurdsson
L. Franzson
L. Steingrimsdottir
H. Sigvaldason
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Fossvogur, Reykjavik, Iceland. maria@shr.is
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(12):1031-5
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Remodeling - physiology
Calcium - administration & dosage
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Collagen - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland
Osteocalcin - blood
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
Parathyroid hormone (PTH) may be an important determinant of cortical bone remodeling in the elderly. Vitamin D status is one of the determining factors in this relationship. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between serum PTH, vitamin D and bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly women in Reykjavik (64 degrees N), where daily intake of cod liver oil is common and mean calcium intake is high. In PTH correlated inversely with 25(OH)D (r = -0.26, p
PubMed ID
11256894 View in PubMed
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Change in levels of persistent organic pollutants in human plasma after consumption of a traditional northern Norwegian fish dish-mølje (cod, cod liver, cod liver oil and hard roe).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71408
Source
J Environ Monit. 2003 Feb;5(1):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Torkjel M Sandanger
Magritt Brustad
Eiliv Lund
Ivan C Burkow
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Air Research, The Polar Environmental Centre, No-9296 Tromsø, Norway. torkjel.sandanger@nilu.no
Source
J Environ Monit. 2003 Feb;5(1):160-5
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil - chemistry
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - blood
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Insecticides - analysis - blood
Liver - chemistry
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Public Health
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The traditional northern Norwegian fish dish "mølje", consisting of boiled cod, cod liver, cod liver oil and hard roe, is still consumed frequently during the winter months January to March. The liver of the cod is rich in lipids and the levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are relatively high. To better understand the short-term consequences of this traditional meal on the plasma levels of PCBs and p,p'-DDE, individual intake of liver and cod liver oil during one meal was measured. Blood samples were collected from 33 participants before the meal, and then 4 h, 12 h and 5 days after it. Lipid-weight and wet-weight levels of 10 PCB congeners and p,p'-DDE were determined in the plasma samples and the food. The plasma levels of p,p'-DDE was found to increase significantly from 0 to 4 h, both when expressed as wet-weight (35% change) and lipid-weight (20% change). The corresponding changes (0-4 h) in wet-weight levels of the most prevalent PCB congeners were non significant. By contrast, PCB congeners with low levels in the food showed a significant drop in lipid-weight levels during the first 4 h. The observed changes were independent of amount consumed. Significant differences in fasting and non-fasting samples were found for most PCBs and p,p'-DDE. For the lipid weight levels of sum PCBs there was a significant decrease of 16% from non-fasting to fasting samples. To obtain reliable data on human levels of POPs it is, on the basis of these findings, recommended that blood samples should be collected from fasting individuals and both wet-weight and lipid-weight levels should be reported.
PubMed ID
12619772 View in PubMed
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Change in plasma levels of vitamin D after consumption of cod-liver and fresh cod-liver oil as part of the traditional north Norwegian fish dish "Mølje".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185563
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Mar;62(1):40-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Magritt Brustad
Torkjel Sandanger
Tom Wilsgaard
Lage Aksnes
Eiliv Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. magritt.brustad@ism.uit.no
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Mar;62(1):40-53
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Cooking
Dietary Supplements
Female
Fishes
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Time
Vitamin D - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
To assess changes in plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations after ingestion of , a traditional north Norwegian fish dish rich in vitamin D.
Thirty-three volunteers all living in the city of Tromsø, located in northern Norway (latitude 690), were served a "Mølje" meal consisting of cod, hard roe, cod liver, and fresh cod-liver oil. The amounts of liver, and cod-liver oil consumed were weighed and recorded. Blood samples were collected before the meal, and at 4 hours, 12 hours and 5 days after it. The cod liver and cod-liver oil were analysed for vitamin D content and the plasma samples for the metabolite 25(OH)D. Trends in plasma 25(OH)D levels during the five-day observation period were analysed. The study was conducted at the beginning of April of 2000.
Among the 33 participating subjects, 69.7% had baseline plasma 25(OH)D concentrations below 50 nmol/l and for one-quarter of the subjects, they were
PubMed ID
12725340 View in PubMed
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Cod liver oil consumption, smoking, and coronary heart disease mortality: Three counties, Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53879
Source
Pages 143-149 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Nutrition and environment 60I2001 COD LIVER OIL CONSUMPTION, SMOKING, AND CORONARY HEART DISEASE MORTALITY:THREE COUNTIES, NORWAY ABSTRACT It has been hypothesized that omega-3 fatty acid consumption may lessen the adverse effect of smoking on coronary heart disease (CHO) risk. Thus, we
  1 document  
Author
Egeland, G.M
Meyer, H.E
Selmer, R
Tverdal, A
Vollset, SE
Author Affiliation
National Health Screening Service, Research Department, P.O. Box 8155, 0033 Oslo, Norway. grace.egeland@isf.uib.no
Source
Pages 143-149 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part I, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(2)
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Adult
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Cohort study
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
It has been hypothesized that omega-3 fatty acid consumption may lessen the adverse effect of smoking on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Thus, we explored whether cod liver oil consumption was protective of coronary heart disease in a cohort of men and women participating in a cardiovascular disease screening in Norway. The study population was aged 35-54 at the time of the baseline screening conducted by the National Health Screening Service of Norway in 1977-1983. Of 56,718 age-eligible men and women, 52,138 participated, of whom 42,612 (82%) completed a dietary questionnaire. Cod liver oil use was reported by 12.5%. At baseline, cod liver oil users had lower triglycerides, adjusting for age, body mass index, time since last meal and income (p
PubMed ID
11507963 View in PubMed
Documents
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Cod liver oil does not reduce ventricular extrasystoles after myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55410
Source
J Intern Med. 1989 Jul;226(1):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1989
Author
T. Hardarson
A. Kristinsson
G. Skúladóttir
H. Asvaldsdóttir
S P Snorrason
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, Landspitalinn, Iceland.
Source
J Intern Med. 1989 Jul;226(1):33-7
Date
Jul-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiac Complexes, Premature - etiology - prevention & control
Cod Liver Oil - therapeutic use
Fish Oils - therapeutic use
Heart Ventricles
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Previous work has shown that in experimental animal models a lower incidence of arrhythmias and sudden death was observed if the animals were fed cod liver oil or fish oil. After a 48-h control period starting, on average, 8 days after the onset of symptoms, 18 men who were recovering from acute myocardial infarction were given 20 ml d-1 cod liver oil for 6 weeks, either immediately after the control period, weeks 0-6 (n = 10), or during weeks 6-12 (n = 8). Forty-eight-hour Holter monitoring was carried out before cod liver oil administration and at the end of weeks 6 and 12. The eicosapentaenoic acid content of plasma phospholipids was increased by 230% during cod liver oil administration. However, no significant change was observed in the 24-h prevalence of ventricular extrasystoles or other arrhythmias during the study period. The mean ln number of ventricular extrasystoles was 2.95 +/- 0.51 (+/- SEM) during cod liver oil ingestion and 2.63 +/- 0.30 when not taking cod liver oil.
PubMed ID
2474049 View in PubMed
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Cod liver oil intake and incidence of asthma in Norwegian adults--the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120716
Source
Thorax. 2013 Jan;68(1):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Xiao-Mei Mai
Arnulf Langhammer
Yue Chen
Carlos A Camargo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. xiao-mei.mai@ntnu.no
Source
Thorax. 2013 Jan;68(1):25-30
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Vitamin A - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Cod liver oil is an important source of vitamin D, but also contains other fat-soluble components such as vitamin A. Before 1999, the cod liver oil formula in Norway contained a high concentration of vitamin A (1000 µg per 5 ml). High vitamin A status is associated with increased risks of several chronic diseases.
To investigate the association between cod liver oil intake and asthma development.
In the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, a total of 25 616 Norwegian adults aged 19-55 years were followed up from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008. Current analysis based on 17 528 subjects who were free of asthma and had complete information on cod liver oil intake at baseline. Cod liver oil intake was defined as daily intake = 1 month during the year prior to baseline. Incident asthma was reported as new-onset asthma during the 11-year follow-up.
Of the 17 528 subjects, 18% (n=3076) consumed cod liver oil daily for = 1 month over the past year. Cod liver oil intake was significantly associated with incident asthma with an OR of 1.62 (95% CI 1.32 to 1.98) after adjustment for age, sex, daily smoking, physical activity, education, socio-economic status, family history of asthma, and body mass index (BMI). The positive association was consistent across age (
PubMed ID
22977130 View in PubMed
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Consumption of lean fish reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a prospective population based cohort study of Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259936
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(2):e89845
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Charlotta Rylander
Torkjel M Sandanger
Dagrun Engeset
Eiliv Lund
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(2):e89845
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Female
Fish Products
Fishes
Food Habits - physiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The effects of fish consumption and n-3 fatty acids on type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have recently been debated.
We explored the risk of T2DM in relation to consumption of lean fish, fatty fish, fish products and total fish as well as cod liver oil supplements in a representative sample of Norwegian women.
This was a prospective population based cohort study in 33740 women free of T2DM, stroke, angina or heart attack and with detailed information on important co-variates and dietary intake at baseline. Risk ratios and corresponding 95% CI were estimated using Poisson regression with log-person time as offset.
Lean fish consumption was inversely associated with T2DM compared to zero intake. Risk ratios and 95% CI for intake of 75 and 100 g lean fish per day were 0.71 (0.51, 0.98) and 0.67 (0.46, 0.98), respectively. There was no effect of intake of fatty fish, fish products, total fish or use of cod liver oil supplements on the risk of T2DM.
Lean fish consumption of 75-100 g/d had a beneficial effect on T2DM. It remains unclear whether lean fish in itself has a protective effect on T2DM or that lean fish consumers have a protective life-style that we were not able to take into account in this study. Unfavorable effects of fatty fish consumption or use of cod liver oil supplements on T2DM were not observed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24587071 View in PubMed
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Coregulation of adrenoceptors and the lipid environment in heart muscle during repeated adrenergic stimulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11475
Source
J Mol Cell Cardiol. 1995 Jan;27(1):243-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
S. Gudbjarnason
V E Benediktsdóttir
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Science Institute, Reykjavik.
Source
J Mol Cell Cardiol. 1995 Jan;27(1):243-51
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Butter
Cod Liver Oil
Comparative Study
Corn Oil
Dietary Fats - pharmacology
Epinephrine - pharmacology
Heart - drug effects - physiology
Kinetics
Male
Membrane Lipids - metabolism
Myocardium - metabolism
Phosphatidylcholines - metabolism
Phosphatidylethanolamines - metabolism
Phospholipids - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-1 - metabolism
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta - metabolism
Sarcolemma - drug effects - metabolism - physiology
Sodium Channels - metabolism
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine changes in binding properties of alpha 1-adrenoceptors, beta-adrenoceptors and L-Ca channels in rat heart muscle in relation to changes in the lipid environment within the membrane, i.e. fatty acyl chain composition of membrane phospholipids, occurring during repeated adrenergic stimulation. The effect of daily administration of epinephrine for seven days upon the maximum number of binding sites of adrenoceptors and upon the fatty acyl chain composition of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine was examined in 10 months old rats. Decrease in Bmax of adrenoceptors during repeated adrenergic stimulation coincided with remodeling of the membrane phospholipids, with replacement of 18:2n-6 by 20:4n-6 in phosphatidylcholine and by 22:6n-3 in phosphatidylethanolamine, respectively. The effect of repeated adrenergic stimulation was also examined in rats fed different dietary fats and oils, i.e. butter, corn oil or cod liver oil, in hearts with markedly different levels of 18:2n-6, 20:4n-6 and 22:6n-3. The binding properties of the adrenoceptors and L-Ca channels did not relate to the fatty acyl chain composition of bulk phospholipids, but the epinephrine induced decrease in Bmax of the receptors was always accompanied by replacement of 18:2n-6 by 20:4n-6 in phosphatidylcholine and by 22:6n-3 in phosphatidylethanolamine, regardless of the initial level of these fatty acyl chains in the phospholipids. It is concluded that adaption to repeated adrenergic stimulation may include coregulation of the lipid environment within the membrane and the binding properties of adrenoceptors, and possibly other functionally coupled proteins such as L-Ca channels, residing in the membrane.
PubMed ID
7760348 View in PubMed
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Diet and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma: a prospective study of 50,757 Norwegian men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22070
Source
Int J Cancer. 1997 May 16;71(4):600-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-16-1997
Author
M B Veierød
D S Thelle
P. Laake
Author Affiliation
Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo, Norway. marit.veierod@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Int J Cancer. 1997 May 16;71(4):600-4
Date
May-16-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Cod Liver Oil - adverse effects
Coffee
Diet
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The relationship between dietary habits and subsequent risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) was studied in 25,708 men and 25,049 women aged 16-56 years attending a Norwegian health screening in 1977-1983. Linkage to the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway ensured a complete follow-up until December 31, 1992. Diet was recorded through a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire at the time of screening, and 108 cases of CMM were identified during follow-up. Use of cod liver oil supplementation and intake of polyunsaturated fat were associated with significant increased risk and drinking coffee with significant decreased risk of CMM in women. Adjusting for height, body mass index, body surface area, education, smoking or occupational or recreational physical activity did not change the results. No significant association was found between the incidence of CMM and any of the dietary factors in men. Important aspects are residual confounding by sun exposure and social class, as well as concern with multiple comparisons.
PubMed ID
9178814 View in PubMed
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36 records – page 1 of 4.