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Cancer incidence among Finnish male cobalt production workers in 1969-2013: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290393
Source
BMC Cancer. 2017 05 18; 17(1):340
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-18-2017
Author
Riitta Sauni
Panu Oksa
Jukka Uitti
Asko Linna
Raimo Kerttula
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Department for Occupational Safety and Health, Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, P.O. Box 33, FI-00023 Government, Tampere, Finland. riitta.sauni@stm.fi.
Source
BMC Cancer. 2017 05 18; 17(1):340
Date
05-18-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cobalt - toxicity
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There is inadequate evidence for the carcinogenicity of cobalt and cobalt compounds in humans. Consequently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has evaluated cobalt metal without tungsten carbide as possibly carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B). The aim of the study was to assess the risk of cancer among workers employed in a Finnish cobalt plant since the beginning of production in 1968.
The study cohort consisted of all males employed by the Finnish cobalt plant for at least a year during 1968-2004. The follow-up for cancer was performed by studying the files of the Finnish Cancer Registry, using personal identity codes as a key. The cohort was divided into subcohorts by exposure levels. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated as ratios of the observed numbers of cancer cases and the numbers expected on the basis of incidence rates in the population of the same region.
The follow-up cohort consisted of 995 men with 26,083 person-years. During the follow-up period, 92 cases of cancer were diagnosed (SIR 1.00, 95% CI 0.81-1.22), six of which were lung cancer cases (SIR 0.50; 95% CI 0.18-1.08). The only cancer type with increased incidence was tongue cancer (three cases, SIR 7.39; 95% CI 1.52-21.6). We observed no dose-response effect across the different exposure levels and the incidence of any cancer type.
The results suggest that occupational exposure to cobalt is not associated with an increased overall cancer risk or lung cancer risk among cobalt workers. Because of the small number of cancer cases the results must be interpreted with caution.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28521771 View in PubMed
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Fluctuations in the prevalence of nickel and cobalt allergy in eczema patients patch tested after implementation of the nickel regulation in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137962
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2011 Mar;64(3):126-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Caroline Carøe
Klaus E Andersen
Charlotte G Mortz
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2011 Mar;64(3):126-31
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cobalt - toxicity
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology
Eczema - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nickel - standards - toxicity
Patch Tests
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
A recent Danish study showed that the prevalence of nickel allergy decreased among young female patients and increased among older female patients with dermatitis patch tested between 1985 and 2007 at Gentofte Hospital, Denmark. The prevalence of cobalt allergy remained unchanged.
To examine fluctuations in the prevalence of nickel and cobalt allergy after implementation of the nickel regulation, by analysing patch test results from male and female patients with dermatitis tested between 1992 and 2009 at Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
A retrospective analysis of patch test data was performed (female, n = 5821; male, n = 3317). Comparisons were made using the chi-square test for trend. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations.
The prevalence of nickel allergy decreased significantly among the 2-30-year-old female patients, from 29.8% in 1992-1997 to 19.6% in 2004-2009 (p 60-year-old female patients. The overall prevalence of cobalt allergy increased significantly, from 3.7% in 1992-1997 to 5.1% in 2004-2009 (p = 0.03). The overall prevalence of nickel and cobalt allergy among male patients during the test period was 5.2% and 2.2%, respectively, and no significant change across the test years was detected.
The prevalence of nickel allergy decreased among young female patients and increased among older female patients with dermatitis, probably because of a cohort effect. The overall prevalence of cobalt allergy increased from 1992 to 2009. No significant trend in the prevalence of nickel and cobalt allergy among male patients was found.
PubMed ID
21226715 View in PubMed
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The mystery of the Quebec beer-drinkers' cardiomyopathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111069
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Oct 7;97(15):930-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-7-1967
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Oct 7;97(15):930-1
Date
Oct-7-1967
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - complications
Beer
Cardiomyopathies - etiology
Cobalt - toxicity
Disease Outbreaks
Food Additives
Humans
Quebec
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1966 Oct 17;198(3):253-64223885
PubMed ID
6051266 View in PubMed
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Toxic trace element reference levels in blood and urine: influence of gender and lifestyle factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10988
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1997 Sep 26;204(2):147-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-26-1997
Author
J. Kristiansen
J M Christensen
B S Iversen
E. Sabbioni
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. jkr@ami.dk
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1997 Sep 26;204(2):147-60
Date
Sep-26-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arsenic - blood - toxicity - urine
Chromium - toxicity - urine
Cobalt - toxicity - urine
Denmark
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Lead - blood - toxicity
Life Style
Male
Manganese - blood
Manganese Poisoning
Middle Aged
Nickel - toxicity - urine
Occupational Exposure
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Trace Elements - blood - toxicity - urine
Abstract
This study is part of the EURO-TERVIHT project (Trace Element Reference Values in Human Tissues) which aims at establishing reference intervals for trace elements in blood, urine and other human tissues. In this study reference intervals (0.05-0.95 fractiles) were estimated for lead in blood (105-529 nmol/l for men, 80-340 nmol/l for women), manganese in blood (100-271 nmol/l) and arsenic in urine (36-541 nmol/l for men, 21-475 nmol/l for women). Upper reference limits (0.95 fractile) were established for chromium in urine (13 nmol/l), nickel in urine (52 nmol/l) and cobalt in urine (23 nmol/l for men, 31 nmol/l for women). The reference group was a Danish subpopulation (n = 189), age 40-70 years. The influence of gender, age, health status parameters, nutrition and various lifestyle factors was investigated. Urinary arsenic and blood lead levels were found to be higher for men than for women. Arsenic levels also increased with age up to 60 years, and then decreased. Alcohol intake lead to increased arsenic levels in urine as well as blood lead levels. Urinary nickel levels were higher in persons frequently eating porridge and porridge oats.
PubMed ID
9301099 View in PubMed
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