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6 records – page 1 of 1.

[Air dust level in the cabins of excavators at the Borodinskii coal-stripping section of the Kansk-Achinsk Fuel and Energy complex].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237454
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1986 Feb;(2):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1986

Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments of lower reaches of the Don River (Russia) and their ecotoxicologic assessment by bacterial lux-biosensors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267038
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2015 May;187(5):277
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
I S Sazykin
M A Sazykina
M I Khammami
N V Kostina
L E Khmelevtsova
R G Trubnik
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2015 May;187(5):277
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biosensing Techniques
Coal - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estuaries
Geologic Sediments - analysis - chemistry
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis
Rivers - chemistry
Russia
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The lower Don River in the south of the European part of Russia was studied to determine the concentration, spatial distribution, and sources of 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments. Total PAH concentrations ranged from 14.2 to 529 ng/g-dw. Sedimentary PAH concentrations were higher in the delta of the Don River and in the estuaries of rivers Sal and Aksai compared to the main channel of the Don. Analysis of the PAHs sources showed that PAHs came mostly from pyrogenic sources as a result of incomplete combustion of coal. Bioluminescent bacterial sensors were used for ecotoxicological assessment of surface sediments. The surface sediments of all the investigated stations of lower reaches of the Don River were toxic and genotoxic. The maximum concentration of PAHs and the high genotoxicity effect caused by the presence of genotoxicants were found in the surface sediments of the same stations. Significant correlations between the concentrations of individual PAHs in sediments and the genotoxic effect were found. Correlation between genotoxicity of surface sediments and concentration of phenanthrene and benz(k)fluoranthene was the most significant both with and without application of metabolic activation.
PubMed ID
25893752 View in PubMed
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Environmentally friendly use of non-coal ashes in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84614
Source
Waste Manag. 2007;27(10):1428-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Ribbing C.
Author Affiliation
Svenska EnergiAskor AB, Torsgatan 12, SE-111 23 Stockholm, Sweden. claes.ribbing@energiaskor.se
Source
Waste Manag. 2007;27(10):1428-35
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - analysis - prevention & control
Cities
Coal - analysis - toxicity
Conservation of Natural Resources - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Environmental monitoring
Guidelines as Topic
Hazardous Substances - analysis - toxicity
Hydrogen - analysis - toxicity
Incineration
Refuse Disposal - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish Thermal Engineering Research Institute (Värmeforsk) initiated an applied research program "Environmentally friendly use of non-coal ashes", in 2002. The program aims at increasing knowledge on the by-products of energy production and their application. The goal of formulating technical and environmental guidelines and assessments is a major point of the program, which is supported by about forty authorities and private organisations. The programme has been divided into four areas: recycling of ashes to forests, geotechnical applications, use in landfilling, and environmental aspects and chemistry. Among all results obtained, the following progress is shown: *Evidence for the positive effects of spreading ashes on forest growth. *A proposal for environmental guidelines on the utilisation of ashes in construction. *A handbook for using non-coal fly ashes in unpaved roads. *Technical and environmental assessments of MSWI bottom ashes in road construction. *Development of the use of ashes with municipal wastewater sludge as a cover for landfills and mine tailings. *Use of ashes from bio-fuels in concrete and replacement of cement in stoop mining. *A method to classify those by-products from combustion that have mirror entries in the EWC as a hazardous or non-hazardous compound. The Ash Programme has also made it possible to increase knowledge on ashes as valuable materials, on quality assurance and on markets for recovered materials.
PubMed ID
17521898 View in PubMed
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Experimental evaluation of main emissions during coal processing waste combustion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291287
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Feb; 233:299-305
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Margarita A Dmitrienko
Jean C Legros
Pavel A Strizhak
Author Affiliation
National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk 634050, Russia. Electronic address: mad2@tpu.ru.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Feb; 233:299-305
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
China
Coal - analysis
Environmental monitoring
India
Refuse Disposal - methods
Russia
Temperature
Abstract
The total volume of the coal processing wastes (filter cakes) produced by Russia, China, and India is as high as dozens of millions of tons per year. The concentrations of CO and CO2 in the emissions from the combustion of filter cakes have been measured directly for the first time. They are the biggest volume of coal processing wastes. There have been many discussions about using these wastes as primary or secondary components of coal-water slurries (CWS) and coal-water slurries containing petrochemicals (CWSP). Boilers have already been operationally tested in Russia for the combustion of CWSP based on filter cakes. In this work, the concentrations of hazardous emissions have been measured at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000°?. The produced CO and CO2 concentrations are shown to be practically constant at high temperatures (over 900°?) for all the coal processing wastes under study. Experiments have shown the feasibility to lowering the combustion temperatures of coal processing wastes down to 750-850°?. This provides sustainable combustion and reduces the CO and CO2 emissions 1.2-1.7 times. These relatively low temperatures ensure satisfactory environmental and energy performance of combustion. Using CWS and CWSP instead of conventional solid fuels significantly reduces NOx and SOx emissions but leaves CO and CO2 emissions practically at the same level as coal powder combustion. Therefore, the environmentally friendly future (in terms of all the main atmospheric emissions: CO, CO2, NOx, and SOx) of both CWS and CWSP technologies relies on low-temperature combustion.
PubMed ID
29096302 View in PubMed
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Separation and capture of CO2 from large stationary sources and sequestration in geological formations--coalbeds and deep saline aquifers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95900
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2003 Jun;53(6):645-715
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
White Curt M
Strazisar Brian R
Granite Evan J
Hoffman James S
Pennline Henry W
Author Affiliation
DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15236, USA. curt.white@netl.doe.gov
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2003 Jun;53(6):645-715
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Climate
Coal - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Geological Phenomena
Geology
Greenhouse Effect
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
The topic of global warming as a result of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration is arguably the most important environmental issue that the world faces today. It is a global problem that will need to be solved on a global level. The link between anthropogenic emissions of CO2 with increased atmospheric CO2 levels and, in turn, with increased global temperatures has been well established and accepted by the world. International organizations such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have been formed to address this issue. Three options are being explored to stabilize atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and global temperatures without severely and negatively impacting standard of living: (1) increasing energy efficiency, (2) switching to less carbon-intensive sources of energy, and (3) carbon sequestration. To be successful, all three options must be used in concert. The third option is the subject of this review. Specifically, this review will cover the capture and geologic sequestration of CO2 generated from large point sources, namely fossil-fuel-fired power gasification plants. Sequestration of CO2 in geological formations is necessary to meet the President's Global Climate Change Initiative target of an 18% reduction in GHG intensity by 2012. Further, the best strategy to stabilize the atmospheric concentration of CO2 results from a multifaceted approach where sequestration of CO2 into geological formations is combined with increased efficiency in electric power generation and utilization, increased conservation, increased use of lower carbon-intensity fuels, and increased use of nuclear energy and renewables. This review covers the separation and capture of CO2 from both flue gas and fuel gas using wet scrubbing technologies, dry regenerable sorbents, membranes, cryogenics, pressure and temperature swing adsorption, and other advanced concepts. Existing commercial CO2 capture facilities at electric power-generating stations based on the use of monoethanolamine are described, as is the Rectisol process used by Dakota Gasification to separate and capture CO2 from a coal gasifier. Two technologies for storage of the captured CO2 are reviewed--sequestration in deep unmineable coalbeds with concomitant recovery of CH4 and sequestration in deep saline aquifers. Key issues for both of these techniques include estimating the potential storage capacity, the storage integrity, and the physical and chemical processes that are initiated by injecting CO2 underground. Recent studies using computer modeling as well as laboratory and field experimentation are presented here. In addition, several projects have been initiated in which CO2 is injected into a deep coal seam or saline aquifer. The current status of several such projects is discussed. Included is a commercial-scale project in which a million tons of CO2 are injected annually into an aquifer under the North Sea in Norway. The review makes the case that this can all be accomplished safely with off-the-shelf technologies. However, substantial research and development must be performed to reduce the cost, decrease the risks, and increase the safety of sequestration technologies. This review also includes discussion of possible problems related to deep injection of CO2. There are safety concerns that need to be addressed because of the possibilities of leakage to the surface and induced seismic activity. These issues are presented along with a case study of a similar incident in the past. It is clear that monitoring and verification of storage will be a crucial part of all geological sequestration practices so that such problems may be avoided. Available techniques include direct measurement of CO2 and CH4 surface soil fluxes, the use of chemical tracers, and underground 4-D seismic monitoring. Ten new hypotheses were formulated to describe what happens when CO2 is pumped into a coal seam. These hypotheses provide significant insight into the fundamental chemical, physical, and thermodynamic phenomena that occur during coal seam sequestration of CO2.
Notes
Comment In: J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2003 Jun;53(6):643-412828329
PubMed ID
12828330 View in PubMed
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Thermal degradations of wood biofuels, coals and hydrolysis lignin from the Russian Federation: Experiments and modeling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279098
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:1046-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Evgeniya Popova
Aleksandr Chernov
Pavel Maryandyshev
Alain Brillard
Damaris Kehrli
Gwenaëlle Trouvé
Viktor Lyubov
Jean-François Brilhac
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:1046-54
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biofuels - analysis
Biomass
Biopolymers - chemistry
Cellulose - chemistry
Coal - analysis
Computer simulation
Hydrolysis
Kinetics
Lignin - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Picea - chemistry
Pinus - chemistry
Polysaccharides - chemistry
Russia
Temperature
Thermogravimetry
Wood - chemistry
Abstract
The thermal degradation of wood biofuels (spruce, pine), of coals from different fields of the Russian Federation and of hydrolysis lignin is investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer under different heating conditions and under non-oxidative or oxidative atmospheres. The samples are indeed submitted to a linear temperature ramp of 10K/min or to a temperature ramp of 200K/min up to a residence temperature between 250 and 450°C where they are maintained during 4h (isothermal conditions). The values of the kinetic parameters are determined for these different samples in both thermal conditions, either using the differential isoconversional method or by means of an Extended Independent Parallel Reaction (EIPR) model. The values of the kinetic parameters obtained with this EIPR model for spruce trunk are also compared with that of its main constituents (hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin).
PubMed ID
27455128 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.