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1242 records – page 1 of 125.

5-Aminosalicylic acid enemas in treatment of distal ulcerative colitis and proctitis in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234423
Source
Dig Dis Sci. 1987 Dec;32(12 Suppl):64S-66S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
L R Sutherland
F. Martin
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, University of Calgary, Canada.
Source
Dig Dis Sci. 1987 Dec;32(12 Suppl):64S-66S
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aminosalicylic Acids - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Colitis, Ulcerative - drug therapy
Double-Blind Method
Enema
Female
Humans
Male
Mesalamine
Proctitis - drug therapy
Random Allocation
Time Factors
Abstract
The efficacy and safety of 4 g 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) enemas were assessed in 59 patients with ulcerative colitis involving up to 50 cm of their distal colon. Twenty-nine patients received 5-ASA and 30 received a placebo. There were 12 dropouts (five in the active and seven in the placebo group) during the study because of insufficient efficacy. After six weeks of therapy, 63% of the patients receiving the 5-ASA were considered to be "much improved" by the study physician compared to 20% patients on placebo (P less than 0.0001). A disease activity index (DAI), based upon patient symptoms and sigmoidoscopic appearance, was used to assess efficacy. Mean DAI declined 75% for patients on 5-ASA enemas and 32% for patients on placebo (P less than 0.05). The 5-ASA enemas are well tolerated and are of benefit in the treatment of ulcerative colitis confined to the distal colon.
PubMed ID
3319459 View in PubMed
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[7 clinics evaluate metronidazole therapy in Crohn's disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250551
Source
Lakartidningen. 1976 Nov 24;73(48):4196-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-24-1976

25-Hydroxycholecaliferol and fractures of the proximal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252013
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-1975
Author
B. Lund
O H Sorensen
A B Christensen
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Date
Aug-16-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcium - blood
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Femoral Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Great Britain
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood - metabolism
Kidney - metabolism
Middle Aged
Osteomalacia - blood - complications - etiology
Phosphorus - blood
Seasons
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-H.C.C.) has been measured in 67 consective cases of fracture of the proximal femur. The values found in these patients were not different from values found in these patients were not different from those in control groups at the same time of the year. Plasma 25-H.C.C. was not correlated to plasma calcium or phosphorus, the Ca times P product, or the alkaline phosphatase. X-rays showed Looser zones in only 1 patient, in whom the lowest plasma 25-H.C.C. was found. Osteomalacia is not uncommon among elderly people in Denmark, but it is more likely to depend on a decline in the renal efficiency to convert 25-H.C.C. to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol than a low dietary intake of vitamin D.
PubMed ID
50509 View in PubMed
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Abatacept as add-on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171770
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2005 Sep;(73):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
C. Allison
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2005 Sep;(73):1-4
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - drug therapy
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Drug Approval
Drug Therapy, Combination
Humans
Immunoconjugates - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Immunologic Factors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Treatment Outcome
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
Abatacept is a co-stimulation blocker that inhibits T-cell activation and interrupts the process leading to inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with severe arthritis who took abatacept with at least one other disease-modifying antirheumatic drug in six and 12-month clinical trials demonstrated statistically significant improvement in tender, swollen joints and other clinical measures compared with placebo. Mild to moderate adverse events included headache, nasopharyngitis, hypertension and back pain. The adverse events were similar to those seen in placebo groups. Abatacept should not be used in combination with other biologic agents because of reported increased rates of serious adverse events, including serious infections. With its different mechanism of action, abatacept may be an alternative add-on therapy for patients with an inadequate response to other arthritis therapies.
PubMed ID
16317826 View in PubMed
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Abdominal aortic aneurysm: endovascular grafts offer a potential alternative to surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191802
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 1998 Jan;(2):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 1998 Jan;(2):1-3
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - economics - methods
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Direct Service Costs
Humans
Stents
Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive - adverse effects - economics - methods
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Endovascular grafts are a new, experimental surgery for AAAs that alleviates the need for open abdominal surgery. They offer an important alternative for high risk patients who would be at a greater risk with the more invasive surgical procedure. However, this is based on limited evidence, and more randomized controlled trials are needed. The procedure may be cheaper than open surgery, because of the lengthy hospital stay and operating room time with the latter, provided that the costs of the devices are low enough. However, there is insufficient data on the outcomes with endovascular grafts in different patient groups. As with many new or minimally invasive techniques, there is a "learning curve" which will affect costs and outcomes. Endovascular grafting is no exception, and repeated practical applications are needed for competence, expertise and good outcomes. Continued monitoring of this technique is needed. A registry of elective AAA patients now has 10-year follow-up data on about a third of the Canadian patients operated on in 1988. Further development of such registries will provide more accurate information on success rates, costs, and long-term complications.
PubMed ID
11811206 View in PubMed
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Abdominoperineal extralevator resection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120975
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Sep;59(9):A4366
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Mattias Prytz
Eva Angenete
Eva Haglind
Author Affiliation
Department of surgery, NU-hospital group, S-461 85, Trollhättan, Sweden. mattias.prytz@vgregion.se
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Sep;59(9):A4366
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - surgery
Clinical Trials as Topic
Humans
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - etiology
Perineum - surgery
Postoperative Complications - etiology
Quality of Life
Rectal Neoplasms - surgery
Registries
Research Design
Self Report
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Abdominoperineal resection for distal rectal cancer is associated with a higher recurrence rate and a poorer overall prognosis than anterior resection. In order to improve the outcome, a more extensive procedure - extralevator abdominoperineal resection - has been introduced. There are, however, currently no prospective or registry-based studies on the effect of this new procedure on local recurrence rates.
Abdominoperineal extralevator resection (APER) is a registry-based Swedish study investigating local recurrence rate three years postoperatively in the entire population of Swedish patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection or extralevator abdominoperineal resection in the 2007-2009-period. In addition to local recurrence rates, the study also investigates the functional and quality-of-life-related outcome 3-4 years postoperatively in the entire study population.
Distal rectal cancer is a surgical and oncological challenge. The APER study will be able to compare the two operative techniques (standard abdominoperineal resection or extralevator abdominoperineal resection) in terms of oncological and functional outcome.
not relevant.
The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01296984.
PubMed ID
22951192 View in PubMed
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Ablation trumps meds for atrial fibrillation treatment. Catheter ablation provides better long-term relief from atrial fibrillation than medication, but surgical ablation is best, a second study concludes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122994
Source
Duke Med Health News. 2012 Mar;18(3):1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012

Academia and industry: lessons from the unfortunate events in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201078
Source
Lancet. 1999 Mar 6;353(9155):771-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-1999
Author
D G Nathan
D J Weatherall
Author Affiliation
Dana Farber Institute of Cancer Research, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Lancet. 1999 Mar 6;353(9155):771-2
Date
Mar-6-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Clinical Trials as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Industry - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Humans
Iron Chelating Agents - therapeutic use
Ontario
Pyridones - therapeutic use
Thalassemia - drug therapy
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 May 29;353(9167):188810359449
PubMed ID
10459956 View in PubMed
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1242 records – page 1 of 125.