Skip header and navigation

Refine By

490 records – page 1 of 49.

Acarbose for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: facts and interpretations concerning the critical analysis of the STOP-NIDDM Trial data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179962
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
J-L Chiasson
R G Josse
R. Gomis
M. Hanefeld
A. Karasik
M. Laakso
Author Affiliation
Research Centre, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal-Hôtel-Dieu, Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 3850 St. Urbain Street, Rm 8-202, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1T7, Canada. jean.louis.chiasson@umontreal.ca
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acarbose - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - chemistry
Body Weight - drug effects
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Clinical Protocols
Data Collection - ethics - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Double-Blind Method
Eating - physiology
Ethics, Clinical
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - classification - etiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Withholding Treatment - ethics
Abstract
The STOP-NIDDM Trial has shown that acarbose treatment in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance is associated with a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications. Kaiser and Sawicki have accused the investigators of the STOP-NIDDM Trial of major biases in the conduct of the study, of manipulating the data and of conflict of interest. The aim of this paper is to present data and explanations refuting these allegations. In the STOP-NIDDM Trial, 61 subjects were excluded from the efficacy analysis before unblinding for legitimate reasons: failure to satisfy major entry criteria (n=17) and lack of post-randomisation data (n=44). Blinding and randomisation were carried out by an independent biostatistician. Titration of placebo/acarbose is well described in the protocol and in the study design paper. Of the study population, 9.3% had a fasting plasma glucose of > or =7.0 mmol/l at screening and could have been diabetic according to the new diagnostic criteria. However, even if these subjects are excluded, patients having acarbose treatment still saw a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes (p=0.0027). The changes in weight are consistent in different publications and are related to different times of follow-up and assessment. Weight change does have an effect on the development of diabetes, but acarbose treatment is still effective even after adjusting for this (p=0.0063). The cardiovascular endpoints were a clearly designated assessment in the original protocol, and only those defined in the protocol and ascertained by the independent Cardiovascular Event Adjudication Committee were used in the analysis. Hypertension was defined according to the most recent diagnostic criteria. The STOP-NIDDM Trial results are scientifically sound and credible. The investigators stand strongly behind these results demonstrating that acarbose treatment is associated with a delay in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications in a high-risk population with IGT.
Notes
Comment In: Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):976-715150689
Comment On: Diabetologia. 2004 Mar;47(3):575-8014727025
PubMed ID
15164169 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptability and profile of the clinical drug trials underway in Finnish university hospitals in the 1990s: applications reviewed by ethics committees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192044
Source
Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Sep;23(7):415-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
T. Keinonen
S. Nieminen
V. Saareks
V. Saano
P. Ylitalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, Finland. tuija.keinonen@medfiles.fi
Source
Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Sep;23(7):415-23
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Protocols - standards
Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Trials as Topic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Ethics Committees, Research - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Informed Consent - statistics & numerical data
Multicenter Studies as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Research Design - standards - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
There is scarce information in literature about the decisions made by ethics committees concerning the clinical studies they have reviewed. A retrospective, detailed review of 666 applications, their amendments and the ethics committees' statements was undertaken. All protrocols of clinical studies on medicinal products submitted to and reviewed by the ethics committees of two university hospitals during the years 1992, 1994, 1996 and 1998 were investigated. Most of the studies were international (50%), multicenter (71%), phase III trials (41%) on a new clinical entity, (38%). Validity of the clinical drug study applications was acceptable in more than half of the cases (364; 55%), while 91 (14%) were approved with advisory comments, 153 (23%) had to be amended, 35 (5%) were left pending and 23 (3%) were rejected. Most of the questions pertained to informed consent and the study protcol. In accordance with precious results, our findings support the opinion that the submitted documents need to be improved, especially with regard to informed consent and study protocols, in order to gain better Good Clinical Practice (GCP) compliance. Well-defined, documented operating procedures of the ethics committees would have facilitated the practical issues in the review process.
PubMed ID
11771857 View in PubMed
Less detail

Achieving the National Quality Forum's "Never Events": prevention of wrong site, wrong procedure, and wrong patient operations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164254
Source
Ann Surg. 2007 Apr;245(4):526-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Robert K Michaels
Martin A Makary
Yasser Dahab
Frank J Frassica
Eugenie Heitmiller
Lisa C Rowen
Richard Crotreau
Henry Brem
Peter J Pronovost
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.
Source
Ann Surg. 2007 Apr;245(4):526-32
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Humans
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Medical Laboratory Science
Risk factors
Safety
Safety Management - methods
Societies, Medical
Surgery Department, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
United States
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Abstract
Review the evidence regarding methods to prevent wrong site operations and present a framework that healthcare organizations can use to evaluate whether they have reduced the probability of wrong site, wrong procedure, and wrong patient operations.
Operations involving the wrong site, patient, and procedure continue despite national efforts by regulators and professional organizations. Little is known about effective policies to reduce these "never events," and healthcare professional's knowledge or appropriate use of these policies to mitigate events.
A literature review of the evidence was performed using PubMed and Google; key words used were wrong site surgery, wrong side surgery, wrong patient surgery, and wrong procedure surgery. The framework to evaluate safety includes assessing if a behaviorally specific policy or procedure exists, whether staff knows about the policy, and whether the policy is being used appropriately.
Higher-level policies or programs have been implemented by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, Veteran's Health Administration, Canadian Orthopaedic, and the North American Spine Society Associations to reduce wrong site surgery. No scientific evidence is available to guide hospitals in evaluating whether they have an effective policy, and whether staff know of the policy and appropriately use the policy to prevent "never events."
There is limited evidence of behavioral interventions to reduce wrong site, patient, and surgical procedures. We have outlined a framework of measures that healthcare organizations can use to start evaluating whether they have reduced adverse events in operations.
Notes
Cites: Anesthesiology. 2006 Nov;105(5):877-8417065879
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2006 Aug;41(4 Pt 2):1599-61716898981
Cites: J Crit Care. 2003 Jun;18(2):71-512800116
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1998 Apr;80(4):4639563374
Cites: Crit Care Clin. 2005 Jan;21(1):1-19, vii15579349
Cites: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;30(1):99-10315690274
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2005 Oct;87(10):2193-516203882
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Dec;116(6):1506-1216322178
Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2006 Feb;32(2):102-816568924
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Apr 4;144(7):510-616585665
Cites: Arch Surg. 2006 Apr;141(4):353-7; discussion 357-816618892
Cites: Ann Surg. 2006 May;243(5):628-32; discussion 632-516632997
Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2006 Jun;32(6):351-516776390
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2006 Jul;34(7):1988-9516715029
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Aug 9;296(6):696-916896113
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2003 Feb;85-A(2):193-712571293
PubMed ID
17414599 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Respir J. 2006 Sep;13(6):306-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Marie-France Beauchesne
Valérie Levert
Miray El Tawil
Manon Labrecque
Lucie Blais
Author Affiliation
Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec. marie-france.beauchesne@umontreal.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2006 Sep;13(6):306-10
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications - therapy
Clinical Protocols
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Planning - utilization
Patient satisfaction
Quebec
Self Care
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Action plans are recommended for most patients with persistent asthma to reduce the morbidity associated with this chronic disease. Unfortunately, despite these recommendations, this tool remains underused.
The authors conducted a descriptive study at the asthma clinic of a tertiary care centre to determine the number of asthmatic patients presenting to a respiratory physician (new reference or follow-up visit) who possessed an individualized, written action plan, and to evaluate the patients' level of confidence and perceived efficacy toward their plans. In addition, for all patients in the study, the level of confidence in and the perceived efficacy of three different action plans (two traditional tools versus a simplified tool) were compared.
A total of 92 asthmatic patients were included in the study. Overall, 46% of the patients possessed an action plan. The patients' average level of confidence and perceived efficacy toward their action plans were high (4.1 out of five and 3.3 out of four, respectively). When the three different action plans were compared, the level of confidence in and perceived efficacy of the traditional tools were similar, both being superior to the simplified tool.
The number of asthmatic patients who presented to the asthma clinic and who possessed an action plan was higher than the reported Canadian mean of 10%; however, most of the patients were treated by specialized respiratory physicians, which may explain this improvement. Considering that most patients with persistent asthma should have an individualized, written action plan, the present study confirms that this tool is still not used for all asthmatic patients.
Notes
Cites: Chest. 2000 Feb;117(2):440-610669688
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Nov 30;161(11 Suppl):S1-6110906907
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Jan;163(1):12-811208619
Cites: Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8 Suppl A:35A-40A11360046
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(1):CD00111712535399
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Mar 15;154(6):821-318634960
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Jan 24;363(9405):271-514751699
Cites: Thorax. 2004 Feb;59(2):94-914760143
Cites: Thorax. 2004 Jul;59(7):550-615223858
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Dec;146(6):1376-71456550
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2002 Nov;110(5 Suppl):S141-21912542074
PubMed ID
16983445 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to the ERAS protocol is Associated with 5-Year Survival After Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280275
Source
World J Surg. 2016 07;40(7):1741-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
07-2016
Author
Ulf O Gustafsson
Henrik Oppelstrup
Anders Thorell
Jonas Nygren
Olle Ljungqvist
Source
World J Surg. 2016 07;40(7):1741-7
Date
07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Clinical Protocols
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Digestive System Surgical Procedures - methods
Early Ambulation
Enteral Nutrition
Female
Fluid Therapy
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Perioperative Care - methods
Postoperative Period
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
Surgical stress can influence oncological outcome and survival. The enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol is designed to reduce perioperative stress and has been shown to reduce postoperative morbidity. We studied if adherence to ERAS is associated with increased long-term survival.
Between the years 2002 and 2007, 911 consecutive patients, operated with major colorectal cancer surgery at Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden were analyzed. The histopathological reports of the resected specimen, date, and cause of death of the patients as well as postoperative CRP levels were obtained. The relation between the rate of adherence to the ERAS protocol at the time of surgery, and the short-term outcomes in relation to 5-year overall and colorectal cancer-specific survival was determined in this retrospective cohort study.
In patients with =70 % adherence to ERAS interventions (N = 273,), the risk of 5-year cancer-specific death was lowered by 42 %, HR 0.58 (0.39-0.88, cox regression) compared to all other patients (
PubMed ID
26913728 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adoption of surgical innovations: factors influencing use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133089
Source
Surg Innov. 2011 Dec;18(4):379-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Frances C Wright
Anna R Gagliardi
Novlette Fraser
May Lynn Quan
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. frances.wright@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Surg Innov. 2011 Dec;18(4):379-86
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Breast Neoplasms - pathology
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Humans
Neoplasm Staging
Patient Selection
Physician's Practice Patterns
Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy - utilization
Abstract
Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has been unevenly adopted into practice in Canada. In this qualitative study, the authors explored individual, institutional, and policy factors that may have influenced SLNB adoption. This information will guide interventions to improve SLNB implementation.
Qualitative methodology was used to examine factors influencing SLNB adoption. Grounded theory guided data collection and analysis. Semistructured interviews were based on Roger's diffusion of innovation theory. Purposive and snowball sampling was used to identify participants. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with urban, rural, academic, and community health care providers and administrators to ensure all perspectives and motivations were explored. Two individuals independently analyzed data and achieved consensus on emerging themes and their relationship.
A total of 43 interviews were completed with 21 surgeons, 5 pathologists, 7 nuclear medicine physicians, and 10 administrators. Generated themes included awareness of SLNB with the exception of some administrators, acknowledged advantage of SLNB, SLNB compatibility with beliefs regarding axillary staging, acknowledgment that SLNB was a complex innovation to adopt, extensive trialing of SLNB prior to adoption, observable benefits with SLNB, acknowledgment that hospital-level administrative support enabled adoption, desire for a provincial policy supporting SLNB to assist in hospital-level adoption, requirement of a local high-volume breast surgery champion who communicated extensively with team to facilitate local adoption, and need for credentialing of SLNB to ensure quality.
SLNB is a complex innovation to adopt. Successful adoption was assisted by a high-volume breast cancer surgical champion, interprofessional communication, and administrative support.
PubMed ID
21742665 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adoption of the children's obesity clinic's treatment (TCOCT) protocol into another Danish pediatric obesity treatment clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269068
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2015;15:13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sebastian W Most
Birgitte Højgaard
Grete Teilmann
Jesper Andersen
Mette Valentiner
Michael Gamborg
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2015;15:13
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Protocols
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Parenting
Pediatric Obesity - psychology - therapy
Professional-Family Relations
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Social Class
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Treating severe childhood obesity has proven difficult with inconsistent treatment results. This study reports the results of the implementation of a childhood obesity chronic care treatment protocol.
Patients aged 5 to 18 years with a body mass index (BMI) above the 99th percentile for sex and age were eligible for inclusion. At baseline patients' height, weight, and tanner stages were measured, as well as parents' socioeconomic status (SES) and family structure. Parental weight and height were self-reported. An individualised treatment plan including numerous advices was developed in collaboration with the patient and the family. Patients' height and weight were measured at subsequent visits. There were no exclusion criteria.
Three-hundred-thirteen (141 boys) were seen in the clinic in the period of February 2010 to March 2013. At inclusion, the median age of patients was 11.1 years and the median BMI standard deviation score (SDS) was 3.24 in boys and 2.85 in girls. After 1 year of treatment, the mean BMI SDS difference was -0.30 (95% CI: -0.39; -0.21, p
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 May;91(5):1165-7120219965
Cites: Pediatrics. 2009 Oct;124(4):1060-819786444
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2010 Nov;99(11):1675-820528793
Cites: Pediatrics. 2011 Jan;127(1):e164-7021149433
Cites: Obes Rev. 2011 Feb;12(2):131-4120122135
Cites: Obes Rev. 2011 May;12(5):e107-1820576004
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Aug;6(3-4):188-9621529264
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 Aug;19(8):1654-6221455125
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Oct;6(5-6):434-4121774577
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Nov;96(11):3533-4021880803
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;(12):CD00187122161367
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Jul;20(7):1539-4322421896
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Aug;20(8):1696-70222484366
Cites: Child Obes. 2012 Dec;8(6):533-4123181919
Cites: Pediatrics. 2012 Dec;130(6):e1647-7123166346
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e7068423894679
Cites: Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2013 Oct;9(10):607-1423897171
Cites: J Hypertens. 2014 Jul;32(7):1470-7; discussion 147724733029
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):7-1424347523
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2009 Nov;207(1):174-8019442975
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Feb;25(2):177-8411410817
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2004 May;89(5):419-2215102630
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Jun 3;350(23):2362-7415175438
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1989 Jun;57(3):450-22500466
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Jan;115(1):22-715629977
Cites: Obes Rev. 2005 Feb;6(1):67-8515655039
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Jun 11;330(7504):135715908441
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006 Sep;160(9):906-2216953014
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2006;1(1):11-2517902211
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Dec;120 Suppl 4:S164-9218055651
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Dec;120 Suppl 4:S193-22818055652
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Dec;120 Suppl 4:S229-5318055653
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Dec;120 Suppl 4:S254-8818055654
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Feb 16;371(9612):569-7818280327
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jun;16(6):1382-718369339
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Jun;17(6):1196-919584877
Cites: Lancet. 2010 May 15;375(9727):1737-4820451244
PubMed ID
25884714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Affect school and script analysis versus basic body awareness therapy in the treatment of psychological symptoms in patients with diabetes and high HbA1c concentrations: two study protocols for two randomized controlled trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279373
Source
Trials. 2016 Apr 27;17(1):221
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-2016
Author
Eva O Melin
Ralph Svensson
Sven-Åke Gustavsson
Agneta Winberg
Ewa Denward-Olah
Mona Landin-Olsson
Hans O Thulesius
Source
Trials. 2016 Apr 27;17(1):221
Date
Apr-27-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Body Image
Clinical Protocols
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Mind-Body Therapies - methods
Patient Education as Topic
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Design
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Depression is linked with alexithymia, anxiety, high HbA1c concentrations, disturbances of cortisol secretion, increased prevalence of diabetes complications and all-cause mortality. The psycho-educational method 'affect school with script analysis' and the mind-body therapy 'basic body awareness treatment' will be trialled in patients with diabetes, high HbA1c concentrations and psychological symptoms. The primary outcome measure is change in symptoms of depression. Secondary outcome measures are changes in HbA1c concentrations, midnight salivary cortisol concentration, symptoms of alexithymia, anxiety, self-image measures, use of antidepressants, incidence of diabetes complications and mortality.
Two studies will be performed. Study I is an open-labeled parallel-group study with a two-arm randomized controlled trial design. Patients are randomized to either affect school with script analysis or to basic body awareness treatment. According to power calculations, 64 persons are required in each intervention arm at the last follow-up session. Patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes were recruited from one hospital diabetes outpatient clinic in 2009. The trial will be completed in 2016. Study II is a multicentre open-labeled parallel-group three-arm randomized controlled trial. Patients will be randomized to affect school with script analysis, to basic body awareness treatment, or to treatment as usual. Power calculations show that 70 persons are required in each arm at the last follow-up session. Patients with type 2 diabetes will be recruited from primary care. This study will start in 2016 and finish in 2023. For both studies, the inclusion criteria are: HbA1c concentration =62.5 mmol/mol; depression, alexithymia, anxiety or a negative self-image; age 18-59 years; and diabetes duration =1 year. The exclusion criteria are pregnancy, severe comorbidities, cognitive deficiencies or inadequate Swedish. Depression, anxiety, alexithymia and self-image are assessed using self-report instruments. HbA1c concentration, midnight salivary cortisol concentration, blood pressure, serum lipid concentrations and anthropometrics are measured. Data are collected from computerized medical records and the Swedish national diabetes and causes of death registers.
Whether the "affect school with script analysis" will reduce psychological symptoms, increase emotional awareness and improve diabetes related factors will be tried, and compared to "basic body awareness treatment" and treatment as usual.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01714986.
Notes
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2009 May;10(3):168-7619175900
Cites: Ann Biol Clin (Paris). 2009 Jan-Feb;67(1):55-6519189886
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2009 Oct;67(4):307-1319773023
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2010 Feb;72(2):187-9119949161
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2010 Apr;33(4):714-2020097784
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Apr;95(4):1602-820130072
Cites: Diabetes Metab. 2010 Dec;36(6 Pt 1):455-6220863735
Cites: Philos Ethics Humanit Med. 2011;6:621473781
Cites: Compr Psychiatry. 2011 Sep-Oct;52(5):536-4121081227
Cites: Diabetologia. 2011 Oct;54(10):2483-9321789690
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2012 Apr;166(4):613-822214924
Cites: Endocrine. 2012 Jun;41(3):494-50022447310
Cites: ScientificWorldJournal. 2012;2012:36596122566765
Cites: Psychol Health. 2012;27(12):1375-8721777156
Cites: J Am Psychoanal Assoc. 2013 Feb;61(1):99-13323343505
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Jun;168(6):861-923536618
Cites: Diabet Med. 2014 Jul;31(7):764-7224606397
Cites: BMC Endocr Disord. 2014;14:7525224993
Cites: Drugs. 2015 Apr;75(6):577-8725851098
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2000 Mar;41(1):25-3010731840
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Jun 10;320(7249):1563-610845962
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2001 Jul-Aug;63(4):619-3011485116
Cites: Int J Psychiatry Med. 2002;32(3):235-4712489699
Cites: Stat Med. 2003 May 15;22(9):1433-4612704607
Cites: Psychol Psychother. 2003 Dec;76(Pt 4):337-4914670185
Cites: Clin Chem. 2004 Jan;50(1):166-7414709644
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2004 Sep 21;141(6):421-3115381515
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Jun;67(6):361-706880820
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1994 Jan;38(1):23-328126686
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1994 Jan;38(1):33-408126688
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Jan 4;334(1):13-87494564
Cites: Int J Audiol. 2004 Sep;43(8):458-6415643739
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2005 Jun;28(6):1339-4515920049
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2005 Oct;46(5):395-40216179021
Cites: Clin Chem Lab Med. 2006;44(12):1441-517163820
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2007 Jan;133(1):122-4817201573
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):391-817877554
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1992 Jul;112(1):155-919565683
PubMed ID
27121185 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air versus land transport of the critically injured patient.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224372
Source
Can J Surg. 1992 Feb;35(1):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
B A McLellan
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Toronto, Ont.
Source
Can J Surg. 1992 Feb;35(1):23-6
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft - statistics & numerical data
Ambulances - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Protocols
Decision Making
Humans
Ontario
Time Factors
Transportation of Patients - methods - standards
Abstract
Trauma patients frequently require transport from the hospital to which they are admitted initially to a trauma unit for further assessment and management. Canada's geography and demography provide unique challenges when transporting the severely injured patient by air or land. The author describes and compares air and land transport for the trauma patient. These complementary modes of transport are an integral part of a comprehensive trauma system.
PubMed ID
1739894 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airway management in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Finland: current practices and outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277157
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2016 Apr 12;24:49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2016
Author
Pamela Hiltunen
Helena Jäntti
Tom Silfvast
Markku Kuisma
Jouni Kurola
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2016 Apr 12;24:49
Date
Apr-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Airway Management - methods
Clinical Protocols
Emergency medical services
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Registries
Abstract
Though airway management methods during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remain controversial, no studies on the topic from Finland have examined adherence to OHCA recommendations in real life. In response, the aim of this study was to document the interventions, success rates, and adverse events in airway management processes in OHCA, as well as to analyse survival at hospital discharge and at follow-up a year later.
During a 6-month study period in 2010, data regarding all patients with OHCA and attempted resuscitation in southern and eastern Finland were prospectively collected. Emergency medical services (EMS) documented the airway techniques used and all adverse events related to the process. Study endpoints included the frequency of different techniques used, their success rates, methods used to verify the correct placement of the endotracheal tube, overall adverse events, and survival at hospital discharge and at follow-up a year later.
A total of 614 patients were included in the study. The incidence of EMS-attempted resuscitation was determined to be 51/100,000 inhabitants per year. The final airway technique was endotracheal intubation (ETI) in 413 patients (67.3%) and supraglottic airway device (SAD) in 188 patients (30.2%). The overall success rate of ETI was 92.5%, whereas that of SAD was 85.0%. Adverse events were reported in 167 of the patients (27.2%). Having a prehospital EMS physician on the scene (p?
Notes
Cites: Eur J Emerg Med. 1999 Sep;6(3):175-8310622380
Cites: Resuscitation. 2015 Oct;95:100-4726477701
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2001 Jan;37(1):32-711145768
Cites: Resuscitation. 2004 May;61(2):149-5315135191
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2004 Aug;99(2):607-13, table of contents15271750
Cites: Resuscitation. 2005 Jul;66(1):21-515993725
Cites: Resuscitation. 2006 Jan;68(1):61-916325329
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2007 Mar;104(3):619-2317312220
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 2008 Mar;100(3):351-618158311
Cites: Curr Opin Crit Care. 2008 Jun;14(3):279-8618467887
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2008 Aug;52(7):897-90718702752
Cites: Circ J. 2009 Mar;73(3):490-619194045
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2009;17:1219265550
Cites: Resuscitation. 2009 Nov;80(11):1248-5219709795
Cites: Resuscitation. 2010 Mar;81(3):323-620006418
Cites: Eur J Emerg Med. 2010 Feb;17(1):10-520201123
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2010 Apr;27(4):321-320385694
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2010 Sep;17(9):926-3120836772
Cites: Resuscitation. 2010 Oct;81(10):1219-7620956052
Cites: Resuscitation. 2010 Oct;81(10):1305-5220956049
Cites: Resuscitation. 2010 Nov;81(11):1479-8720828914
Cites: Resuscitation. 2011 Apr;82(4):378-8521288624
Cites: Duodecim. 2011;127(10):1061-321696005
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2011;19:5621982179
Cites: Resuscitation. 2011 Dec;82(12):1525-821756859
Cites: Crit Care. 2011;15(5):R23621985431
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2012 Dec;60(6):749-754.e222542734
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:8423249522
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2013 Feb;44(2):389-9722541878
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:8023244620
Cites: Resuscitation. 2013 Apr;84(4):446-922940595
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 May;57(5):654-923496058
Cites: Curr Opin Crit Care. 2013 Jun;19(3):181-723519082
Cites: Resuscitation. 2014 May;85(5):617-2224561079
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2014 Jun;42(6):1372-824589641
Cites: Resuscitation. 2014 Jul;85(7):898-90424594093
Cites: Resuscitation. 2014 Jul;85(7):885-9224642405
Cites: Resuscitation. 2015 Aug;93:20-626006743
Cites: Resuscitation. 2000 Sep;47(1):59-7011004382
PubMed ID
27071823 View in PubMed
Less detail

490 records – page 1 of 49.