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113 records – page 1 of 12.

Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Publication Type
Article
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Clinical Nursing Research
History, 21st Century
Humans
Internet
Leadership
Male
Norway
Oncology Nursing - methods
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Social Support
United States
Abstract
The winner of the "Best Original Research Paper in Cancer Nursing" Award for 2013 is "Effects of an Internet Support System to Assist Cancer Patients in Reducing Symptom Distress: A Randomized Controlled Trial" by Cornelia M. Ruland, PhD.
PubMed ID
24149985 View in PubMed
Less detail

Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136673
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Salzmann-Erikson
Kim L Tz N
Ann-Britt Ivarsson
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Dalarna University School of Health and Sciences, Falun, Sweden; Orebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Orebro, Sweden. mse@du.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Clinical Nursing Research
Crisis Intervention
Culture
Emergency Services, Psychiatric
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interview, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing, Team
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - nursing
Research Design
Security Measures
Social Environment
Social Values
Sweden
Therapeutic Community
Abstract
This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.
PubMed ID
21355761 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture as an optional treatment for hospice patients with xerostomia: an intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89927
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2009 Jan;15(1):12-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Meidell Liv
Holritz Rasmussen Birgit
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden. liv.meidell@nurs.umu.se
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2009 Jan;15(1):12-20
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Clinical Nursing Research
Deglutition Disorders - etiology - prevention & control
Feasibility Studies
Female
Hospice Care - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications
Nursing Assessment
Saliva - secretion
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Xerostomia - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
More than 70% of seriously ill patients with cancer suffer from xerostomia and the associated problems of swallowing, chewing and speaking. This study aims to investigate whether treatment with acupuncture is a viable option for hospice patients with xerostomia. During a 2-year period, 117 patients were assessed for xerostomia. Eighty-two patients were found to have moderate xerostomia. Sixty-seven fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. Of these, 14 were included but only eight completed the study. Ten acupuncture treatments were given during a 5-week period. The effect of acupuncture was measured using a visual analogue scale, and by measuring the saliva production before and after the series of treatment. The results show that all the patients experienced alleviation of dryness of the mouth and the associated symptoms, and thus benefited from the acupuncture treatment. However, conducting a 5-week acupuncture intervention study is not feasible at an inpatient hospice due to the patients being too close to death.
PubMed ID
19234425 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Breast Cancer Prevention Trial: nurses' observations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205479
Source
Cancer Nurs. 1998 Jun;21(3):178-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
T G Freedman
Author Affiliation
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104-6096, USA.
Source
Cancer Nurs. 1998 Jun;21(3):178-86
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - nursing - prevention & control
Canada
Clinical Nursing Research - methods
Conflict of Interest
Data Collection - methods
Double-Blind Method
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Informed consent
Nontherapeutic Human Experimentation
Patient Selection
United States
Abstract
The Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT), a case study of a clinical prevention trial, offered a unique opportunity to examine the multifaceted and complex role of the nurse. The primary aims of this study were (a) to identify the self-descriptions of a sample of nurses involved in the day-to-day management of the BCPT, (b) to determine the nurses' perceptions of their own role and the role of the women who joined the BCPT, (c) to understand the role of the nurse in the larger context of a clinical prevention trial, and (d) to expand the knowledge base regarding some of the social and ethical underpinnings of clinical prevention trials with healthy participants. The research design was qualitative, descriptive, and exploratory. The methods used were the telephone interview and the focus group. Fifty BCPT nurses were interviewed. This included 30 telephone interviews and 20 additional BCPT nurses who participated in four national and international focus groups. After analysis of the data using ethnographic methods, a view of the multi-faceted role of the BCPT nurse emerged. On a broader scale, the inquiry raised a number of critical ethical and social issues that are relevant to future clinical prevention trials with volunteer human participants.
PubMed ID
9615508 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can action research be applied in developing clinical teaching?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208912
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 Apr;25(4):801-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
K. Hyrkäs
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Department of Nursing Science, Finland.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 Apr;25(4):801-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Nursing Research - methods
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Finland
Humans
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Program Development
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Abstract
Nursing education has undergone significant changes during the last two decades in Finland. However, clinical teaching has remained unchanged even though it forms the most extensive part of nursing education. National and international research results have also exposed several problems for clinical teaching. In the Finnish nursing education system these problems have remained unsolved probably because many of the suggestions for development, based on research results, presuppose changes in both the college and health care systems. The whole system of clinical teaching was changed during the years 1992-1993 in one nursing college and in one hospital in Tampere, Finland. Action research as a research strategy was applied in this study. The purpose of this paper is to describe the solutions sought and to assess if action research can be applied to the development of clinical teaching.
PubMed ID
9104678 View in PubMed
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Cardiac nurses' perceptions of nursing research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219386
Source
Prog Cardiovasc Nurs. 1994;9(3):7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
S. Robichaud-Ekstrand
H. Sherrard
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Prog Cardiovasc Nurs. 1994;9(3):7-15
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cardiology - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Nursing Research - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Specialties, Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Nurses' perception of nursing research is an important variable affecting the successful development of a clinical nursing research program. The objectives of this study were to: examine the perceived value, role, interest, support and experience of cardiac nurses in nursing research; to determine the effects of age and level of education on their perceptions; and to analyze the reliability of Alcock et al.'s questionnaire. The survey was administered to 313 nurses with a response rate of 46%. Frequency distributions were obtained on individual survey items. MANOVAs were performed as a function of age group and education level, followed by post hoc ANOVAs. Findings showed nurses valued nursing research particularly as it related to clinical practice decisions and solutions to patient care problems. They saw a participatory role in the first stages of the research process. Age was not a factor in nurses' perceptions of nursing research with the exception of perceived support. Diploma nurses indicated higher levels of perceived value (p = 0.000), role (p = 0.034), interest (p = 0.000) and support (p = 0.017) for nursing research than baccalaureate nurses. The Cronbach reliability coefficient of each area indicated high internal consistency (> 0.72). When 5 items in the questionnaire are deleted, the tool exhibits high level of reliability and evidence of construct and discriminant validity.
PubMed ID
7971943 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical approach in psychiatric nursing: study of an advanced practice case].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169218
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Mar;(84):118-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Johanne Goudreau
Marie-Josée Poirier
Francine de Montigny
Author Affiliation
Equipe de recherche en soins de première ligne, Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Mar;(84):118-25
Date
Mar-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Attitude to Health
Certification
Clinical Competence - standards
Clinical Nursing Research
Communication
Helping Behavior
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient Education as Topic
Problem Solving
Psychiatric Nursing - education - organization & administration
Quebec
Abstract
Nowadays many people suffering from severe and persistent mental disorders are cared for in ambulatory settings by multidisciplinary teams. Nurses take an important part in these teams. What is nursing practice in this type of setting? A case study was developed from a nurse's clinical practice in order to answer this question. The results suggest that these nursing services are of an advanced practice nature as defined by Hamric et al. (2000).
PubMed ID
16711085 View in PubMed
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Clinical implementation of a scrubless chlorhexidine/ethanol pre-operative surgical hand rub.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155845
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2008 Jun;26(2):21-2, 26, 29-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Richard Marchand
Sylvie Theoret
Danielle Dion
Michel Pellerin
Author Affiliation
Service of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Dept. of Medical Biology, Montréal Heart Institute, Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2008 Jun;26(2):21-2, 26, 29-31
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Cutaneous
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Chlorhexidine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Clinical Nursing Research
Colony Count, Microbial
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Disinfectants - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Ethanol - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Hand - microbiology
Hand Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology
Hand Disinfection - methods - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Incidence
Personnel, Hospital - psychology
Preoperative Care - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of surgical scrubbing is to reduce the bioburden on the hands of the surgical team in hope that if gloves are punctured or torn, the number of bacteria released at the operation site will be minimal and therefore reduce the risk of site infection. Long procedures with scrubbing and soaping can, however, be counterproductive because with repetition they tend to cause skin abrasions, damages and injuries without further reducing the risk of bacterial release. Within a general review of OR processes, it was decided to substitute to the standard surgical scrub a "new" scrubless pre-op surgical hand rub procedure. This article summarizes the results.
PubMed ID
18678198 View in PubMed
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113 records – page 1 of 12.