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An investigation of the health beliefs and motivations of complementary medicine clients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188626
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Sep;55(6):1025-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Fuschia M Sirois
Mary L Gick
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ont., Canada. fsirois@ccs.carleton.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Sep;55(6):1025-37
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Clinical Medicine - standards
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Disease - classification
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Personality
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The current study was concerned with factors associated with the use of complementary medicine (CM). The reasons for CM use were examined by dividing complementary medicine clients into two groups based on the frequency and length of their use of complementary therapies, and comparing them with conventional medicine clients as well as to each other. New/infrequent CM clients (n = 70), established CM clients (n = 71), and orthodox medicine clients (n = 58) were distinguished on the basis of health beliefs, socio-demographic, medical, and personality variables. Different patterns of predictors of CM use emerged depending on which client groups were compared. In general, health-aware behaviors and dissatisfaction with conventional medicine were the best predictors of overall and initial/ infrequent CM use, and more frequent health-aware behaviors were associated with continued CM use. Medical need also influenced the choice to use CM, and was the best predictor of committed CM use, with the established CM clients reporting more health problems than the new/infrequent CM group. Overall, income was a significant discriminator, but did not predict initial or continued CM use. Openness to new experience was associated with CM use in general, but was most notable in the decision to initially try or explore using CM. The findings support the utility of the three components (predisposing, enabling, and need factors) of the socio-behavioral model for explaining why some people choose CM. Overall, the results of the current study suggest that CM clients need to be looked at in more sophisticated ways, rather than being treated simply as a homogenous group with similar beliefs, motivations and needs.
PubMed ID
12220087 View in PubMed
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Concepts of quality of care: national survey of five self-regulating health professions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103850
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Fooks
M. Rachlis
C. Kushner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-109
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Medicine - standards
Data Collection
Dentistry - standards
Health Occupations - standards
Humans
Licensure
Medical Audit - statistics & numerical data
Nursing - standards
Optometry - standards
Organizations
Pharmacy - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Discussions of quality assurance mechanisms for health professions are increasing in Canada. In their roles of protecting the public from incompetent or unsafe health care, and enhancing the quality of care provided by practitioners, provincial licensing organizations are taking an interest in quality assurance programmes. The paper reports the results from a national survey of five self-regulating health professions (dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry and pharmacy) in Canada. The study found two types of activities in place--a complaints programme and a routine audit programme. Both programmes use a similar approach to identifying poor performers within a health profession. The paper discusses the results of the study, the advantages and disadvantages of the approach used, and suggests a second approach to quality assurance which could be used in conjunction with current activities.
PubMed ID
2103875 View in PubMed
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Descriptive analytical data and consequences for calculation of common reference intervals in the Nordic Reference Interval Project 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51987
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):343-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
P. Rustad
P. Felding
A. Lahti
P. Hyltoft Petersen
Author Affiliation
Fürst Medical Laboratory, Søren Bulls Vei 25, NO-1051 Oslo, Norway. prustad@furst.no
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):343-70
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Chemical Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Chemistry, Clinical - standards
Clinical Chemistry Tests - standards
Clinical Medicine - standards
Databases, Factual
Europe
Humans
International Cooperation
Laboratories, Hospital - standards
Reference Values
Abstract
In the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP), data from 102 Nordic clinical chemical laboratories were obtained. Each laboratory reported analytical data on up to 25 of the most commonly used clinical biochemical properties, including results from each of a minimum of 25 reference individuals. A reference material consisting of a liquid frozen pool of serum with values traceable to reference methods (used as the project "calibrator" for non-enzymes to correct reference values) was measured together with other serum pool controls in each laboratory in the same analytical series as the project samples. The data on the controls were used to evaluate the analytical quality of the routine methods. For reference interval calculations, only such reference values on enzymes were accepted that were obtained by applying the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) compatible methods (37 degrees C), while "calibrator"-corrected reference values were used in the cases of non-enzymes. For each property, gender- and age-specific reference intervals were estimated, based on simple non-parametric calculations and using objective criteria to perform partitioning into subgroups. It is concluded that the same reference intervals are applicable in all five Nordic countries. The following descriptive data for the considered properties are presented in the tables: number of measurement values from each country and measurement system, certified/indicative target values for controls, differences between methods and measurement systems together with coefficients of variation, effects of control correction on the measurement values, differences between subgroups as determined by age, gender, country and material, and comparison of the new reference intervals with those presented in standard textbooks. The 25 components involved in this project were (listed in alphabetical order): Alanine transaminase, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, amylase pancreatic type, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin, calcium, carbamide, cholesterol, creatine kinase, creatininium, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glucose, HDL-cholesterol, iron, iron-binding capacity, lactate dehydrogenase, magnesium, phosphate, potassium, protein, sodium, triglyceride and urate.
PubMed ID
15223700 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of clinical innovation: a gray zone in the ethics of modern clinical practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159448
Source
J Gen Intern Med. 2008 Jan;23 Suppl 1:27-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Johane Patenaude
Andrew M Grant
Marianne Xhignesse
Frédéric Leblanc
Josiane Courteau
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada. Johane.Patenaude@USherbrooke.ca
Source
J Gen Intern Med. 2008 Jan;23 Suppl 1:27-31
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Medicine - standards
Clinical Protocols - standards
Decision Making
Ethics Committees, Research - ethics
Ethics, Medical
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns - ethics
Pilot Projects
Probability
Total Quality Management
Abstract
Various stakeholders can have differing opinions regarding ethical review when introducing new procedures with patients.
This pilot study examines the way in which Research Ethics Boards (REBs; Institutional Review Boards) and clinical biochemists (CBs; laboratory medicine specialists) differ in their interpretation of what is research and what should be considered common practice versus innovation versus experimentation when introducing new procedures with patients. It also explores whether these groups agree on who is responsible for the ethical review of new procedures.
A validated case scenario for the introduction of a new diagnostic test into clinical practice was sent to CBs and REBs across Canada. Participants were asked to determine whether the scenario constituted research; whether the test procedure should be considered as experimental, innovative, or commonly accepted care; and whether the project required approval by a REB and, if not, who should be responsible for ethical review.
Results showed 81% of 37 CBs and 52% of 27 REBs identified the scenario as research. Responsibility for ethical review was assigned to REBs by 44% of REBs and 54% of CBs. Of all participants, 53% classified the test procedure as 'innovative', 8% as 'experimental', whereas 17% classified it as 'commonly accepted'.
This pilot study indicates a substantial variation in the ethical assessment of innovation in clinical care. This suggests the need to further elaborate on the types of innovation in health care and categorize the nature of the risks associated with each.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18095040 View in PubMed
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The impact of new guidelines for glucose tolerance testing on clinical practice and laboratory services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177738
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1067-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2004
Author
Andrew W Lyon
Erik T Larsen
Alun L Edwards
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1067-9
Date
Oct-26-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Canada
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Clinical Medicine - standards
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis
Diagnostic Services - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test - standards
Humans
Male
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Sensitivity and specificity
Notes
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2002 Nov;25(11):1940-512401736
Cites: Ann Clin Biochem. 1998 Jan;35 ( Pt 1):62-79463740
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2003 Feb;26(2):290-612547851
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Cites: Clin Chem Lab Med. 2003 Sep;41(9):1239-4514598876
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Apr 16;136(8):575-8111955025
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Feb 7;346(6):393-40311832527
Cites: Clin Chem. 2002 Jan;48(1):9-1011751532
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Cites: Diabetes Care. 2002 Nov;25(11):2098-912401762
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Aug 8;317(7155):371-59694750
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Mar 1;172(5):61515738473
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Mar 1;172(5):615-615738472
PubMed ID
15505270 View in PubMed
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Medicine and management: looking inside the box of changing hospital governance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285145
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2016 May 24;16 Suppl 2:159
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2016
Author
Ellen Kuhlmann
Ylva Rangnitt
Mia von Knorring
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2016 May 24;16 Suppl 2:159
Date
May-24-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Governance
Clinical Medicine - standards
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Health Policy
Hospitals, Public - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Physicians
Practice Management, Medical - standards
Professional Role
Sweden
Abstract
Health policy has strengthened the demand for coordination between clinicians and managers and introduced new medical manager roles in hospitals to better connect medicine and management. These developments have created a scholarly debate of concepts and an increasing 'hybridization' of tasks and roles, yet the organizational effects are not well researched. This research introduces a multi-level governance approach and aims to explore the organizational needs of doctors using Sweden as a case study.
We apply an assessment framework focusing on macro-meso levels and managerial-professional modes of hospital governance (using document analysis, secondary sources, and expert information) and expand the analysis towards the micro-level. Qualitative explorative empirical material gathered in two different studies in Swedish hospitals serves to pilot research into actor-centred perceptions of clinical management from the viewpoint of the 'managed' and the 'managing' doctors in an organization.
Sweden has developed a model of integrated hospital governance with complex structural coordination between medicine and management on the level of the organization. In terms of formal requirements, the professional background is less relevant for many management positions but in everyday work, medical managers are perceived primarily as colleagues and not as experts advising on managerial problems. The managers themselves seem to rely more on personal strength and medical knowledge than on management tools. Bringing doctors into management may hybridize formal roles and concepts, but it does not necessarily change the perceptions of doctors and improve managerial-professional coordination at the micro-level of the organization.
This study brings gaps in hospital governance into view that may create organizational weaknesses and unmet management needs, thereby constraining more coordinated and integrated medical management.
Notes
Cites: Int J Clin Pract. 2011 Jul;65(7):722-421518159
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PubMed ID
27230654 View in PubMed
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A multicentre study of reference intervals for haemoglobin, basic blood cell counts and erythrocyte indices in the adult population of the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9450
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):385-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
G. Nordin
A. Mårtensson
B. Swolin
S. Sandberg
N J Christensen
V. Thorsteinsson
L. Franzson
V. Kairisto
E-R Savolainen
Author Affiliation
EQUALIS AB, Box 977, SE-751 99 Uppsala, Sweden. gunnar.nordin@equalis.se
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):385-98
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chemistry, Clinical - standards
Clinical Medicine - standards
Europe
Female
Hematologic Tests - methods - standards
Humans
International Cooperation
Laboratories, Hospital - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Abstract
Eight haematological quantities were measured in EDTA anticoagulated venous blood specimens collected from 1826 healthy male and female individuals between 18 and 90 years of age in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden). The samples, collected between November 1999 and November 2001 as part of the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP), were analysed on 12 different types of modern automated haematology instruments currently in use among the 60 laboratories participating in the study. Non-parametric reference intervals (between 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles) have been calculated for B-Haemoglobin (females 117-153 g/L, males 134-170 g/L), B-Erythrocytes (females 3.94-5.16 x 10(12)/L, males 4.25-5.71 x 10(12)/L), B-EVF (females 0.348-0.459, males 0.395-0.500), B-MCV (82-98 fL), Erc-MCH (27.1-33.3 pg), Erc-MCHC (317-357 g/L), B-Trc (females 165-387 x 10(9)/L, males 145 x 348 x 10(9)/L) and B-Lkc (3.5-8.8 x 10(9)/L). Partitioning of data according to age and gender was done according to a standardized procedure. For most variables the calculated reference intervals corresponded well with older and less well-defined reference intervals. The mean concentration of B-Haemoglobin increased by 0.08 g/L per year of age in women, and decreased by 0.1 g/L per year of age in men. B-Haemoglobin increased with body mass index in both men and women. Smoking increased the mean of B-Lkc by 1.1 x 10(9)/L and regular use of alcohol increased the mean of B-MCV by 0.8 fL. The influence of these factors was small overall and did not promote specific reference intervals.
PubMed ID
15223702 View in PubMed
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The Nordic Reference Interval Project 2000: recommended reference intervals for 25 common biochemical properties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51988
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):271-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
P. Rustad
P. Felding
L. Franzson
V. Kairisto
A. Lahti
A. Mårtensson
P. Hyltoft Petersen
P. Simonsson
H. Steensland
A. Uldall
Author Affiliation
Fürst Medical Laboratory, Søren Bulls vei 25, NO-1051 Oslo, Norway. prustad@furst.no
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):271-84
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Chemistry, Clinical - standards
Clinical Chemistry Tests - standards
Clinical Medicine - standards
Europe
Female
Humans
International Cooperation
Laboratories, Hospital - standards
Male
Reference Values
Abstract
Each of 102 Nordic routine clinical biochemistry laboratories collected blood samples from at least 25 healthy reference individuals evenly distributed for gender and age, and analysed 25 of the most commonly requested serum/plasma components from each reference individual. A reference material (control) consisting of a fresh frozen liquid pool of serum with values traceable to reference methods (used as the project "calibrator" for non-enzymes to correct reference values) was analysed together with other serum pool controls in the same series as the project samples. Analytical data, method data and data describing the reference individuals were submitted to a central database for evaluation and calculation of reference intervals intended for common use in the Nordic countries. In parallel to the main project, measurements of commonly requested haematology properties on EDTA samples were also carried out, mainly by laboratories in Finland and Sweden. Aliquots from reference samples were submitted to storage in a central bio-bank for future establishment of reference intervals for other properties. The 25 components were, in alphabetical order: alanine transaminase, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, amylase pancreatic, aspartate transaminase, bilirubins, calcium, carbamide, cholesterol, creatine kinase, creatininium, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glucose, HDL-cholesterol, iron, iron binding capacity, lactate dehydrogenase, magnesium, phosphate, potassium, protein, sodium, triglyceride and urate.
PubMed ID
15223694 View in PubMed
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Nordic Reference Interval Project Bio-bank and Database (NOBIDA): a source for future estimation and retrospective evaluation of reference intervals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51985
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):431-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
P. Rustad
P. Simonsson
P. Felding
M. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Fürst Medical Laboratory, Søren Bulls Vei 25, NO-1051 Oslo, Norway. prustad@furst.no
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):431-8
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chemistry, Clinical - standards
Clinical Medicine - standards
Databases, Factual
Europe
Female
Humans
International Cooperation
Laboratories, Hospital - standards
Male
Reference Values
Abstract
In the Nordic Reference Interval Project 2000 (NORIP) serum, Li-heparin plasma and EDTA buffy coat were collected at 102 laboratories in 5 Nordic countries from healthy individuals aged 18 years or more and evenly distributed for laboratory, gender and age. Multiple aliquots of these samples from each of about 3000 persons are now stored at the Nordic Reference Interval Project Bio-bank and Database (NOBIDA) at a temperature of below -80 degrees C. The commutable NFKK Reference Serum X with certified values traceable to reference methods and measured in NORIP in the same series as the samples is also available from NOBIDA. Data describing the person and the sample conditions are stored together with analytical results and data describing the measurement systems. The bio-bank along with material and data is administered by the NOBIDA committee on behalf of the NFKK (Scandinavian Society of Clinical Chemistry) to be used by Nordic laboratories for any purpose beneficial to the development of clinical biochemistry in general and particularly for creating reference intervals for other biochemical properties than those established by NORIP. Furthermore, research on the already stored information alone is encouraged. Thus colleagues are now welcome to use this extensive material for research and development in clinical biochemistry.
PubMed ID
15223705 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.