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Accuracy and reliability of 'specialized' physical therapists in auscultating tape-recorded lung sounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219667
Source
Physiother Can. 1993;45(1):21-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
D. Brooks
L. Wilson
C. Kelsey
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
Physiother Can. 1993;45(1):21-4
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Auscultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Diagnostic Errors
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Ontario
Physical Therapy Modalities - classification - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Respiratory Function Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Tape Recording
Abstract
This study investigated the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of 'specialized' physical therapists in the auscultation of tape-recorded lung sounds. In addition, a correlation was investigated between accuracy of interpretation and the number of years of specialization in the field of cardiorespiratory physical therapy. This research follows an earlier study which investigated the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of auscultating tape-recorded lung sounds in a 'non-specialized' cohort of physical therapists. The subjects were 26 'specialized' cardiorespiratory physical therapists working in acute urban teaching hospitals. These individuals were required to have been practising currently and exclusively for at least one year in the area of cardiorespiratory physical therapy. Participants listened with a stethoscope to five different sounds and identified them from a standardized list of terms. One of three tapes with the same lung sounds in different order was randomly selected for each physical therapist. The percentage of correct answers for all subjects was calculated. An accurate response in the detection of lung sounds was arbitrarily defined as a percentage of correct answers of 70% or greater. The difference between the pooled correct response rate of 50% and the arbitrarily set value of 70% was statistically significant (z = 2.23, p
PubMed ID
10124337 View in PubMed
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[A clinical skills training program--a structured, accelerated introduction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179455
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 May 17;166(21):2014-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2004
Author
Lisbet Isenberg Ravn
Claus M Lund
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, Anaestesiologisk Afdeling. lisbet.ravn@hh.hosp.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 May 17;166(21):2014-7
Date
May-17-2004
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - education
Clinical Competence - standards
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate - methods - standards
Humans
Internship and Residency - methods - standards
Learning
Motivation
Questionnaires
PubMed ID
15222077 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and validation of the instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision for medical students in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280942
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):308
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Eva Öhman
Hassan Alinaghizadeh
Päivi Kaila
Håkan Hult
Gunnar H Nilsson
Helena Salminen
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):308
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Educational Measurement
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Learning
Primary Health Care
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Medical - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Workplace
Abstract
Clinical learning takes place in complex socio-cultural environments that are workplaces for the staff and learning places for the students. In the clinical context, the students learn by active participation and in interaction with the rest of the community at the workplace. Clinical learning occurs outside the university, therefore is it important for both the university and the student that the student is given opportunities to evaluate the clinical placements with an instrument that allows evaluation from many perspectives. The instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision (CLES) was originally developed for evaluation of nursing students' clinical learning environment. The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the CLES instrument to measure medical students' perceptions of their learning environment in primary health care.
In the adaptation process the face validity was tested by an expert panel of primary care physicians, who were also active clinical supervisors. The adapted CLES instrument with 25 items and six background questions was sent electronically to 1,256 medical students from one university. Answers from 394 students were eligible for inclusion. Exploratory factor analysis based on principal component methods followed by oblique rotation was used to confirm the adequate number of factors in the data. Construct validity was assessed by factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the dimensions of CLES instrument.
The construct validity showed a clearly indicated four-factor model. The cumulative variance explanation was 0.65, and the overall Cronbach's alpha was 0.95. All items loaded similarly with the dimensions in the non-adapted CLES except for one item that loaded to another dimension. The CLES instrument in its adapted form had high construct validity and high reliability and internal consistency.
CLES, in its adapted form, appears to be a valid instrument to evaluate medical students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment in primary health care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27905932 View in PubMed
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Adapting the Key Features Examination for a clinical clerkship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191269
Source
Med Educ. 2002 Feb;36(2):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Rose Hatala
Geoffrey R Norman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Med Educ. 2002 Feb;36(2):160-5
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Clerkship - methods
Clinical Competence - standards
Decision Making
Educational Measurement - methods
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
A written test of clinical decision-making, the Key Features Examination, was developed for use in clerkship.
Following the guidelines provided by the Medical Council of Canada, a Key Features Examination was developed and implemented in an internal medicine clinical clerkship, during the 1998/99 clerkship year. The reliability and concurrent validity of the exam were assessed.
A 2 hour examination, containing 15 key feature problems, was administered to 101 students during 6 consecutive internal medicine clerkship rotations. The reliability of the exam, calculated from Cronbach's alpha, was 0.49. The exam had modest correlation with other measures of knowledge and clinical performance.
The Key Feature Examination is a feasible and reliable evaluation tool that may be implemented as a component of student assessment during a clinical clerkship.
PubMed ID
11869444 View in PubMed
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Addiction medicine in Canada: challenges and prospects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134877
Source
Subst Abus. 2011 Apr;32(2):93-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Nady el-Guebaly
David Crockford
Sharon Cirone
Meldon Kahan
Author Affiliation
Addiction Division, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. nady.el-guebaly@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Subst Abus. 2011 Apr;32(2):93-100
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Certification - methods - standards
Clinical Competence - standards
Clinical Medicine
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Humans
Physicians, Family - education
Psychiatry - education
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - manpower
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
In Canada, the qualification of physicians is the jurisdiction of the College of Family Physicians and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. The Colleges have promoted the training of "generalists" in family medicine and "sophisticated generalists" among the traditional specialties, and the development of subspecialties has not been encouraged. Nevertheless, due to the increasing number of family physicians and specialists practicing a range of new subspecialties, including addiction medicine, the College of Family Physicians has recognized special interest or focused practices, whereas the Royal College has recognized, in psychiatry, 3 subspecialties (child, geriatric, forensic) requiring an extra year of training and may offer others a diploma recognition. These new opportunities will shape the training requirements of addiction medicine leading to available certification through the International and American Medical Societies of Addiction Medicine.
PubMed ID
21534130 View in PubMed
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Advanced home care: patients' opinions on quality compared with those of family members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71155
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Feb;13(2):226-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Bodil Wilde Larsson
Gerry Larsson
Solveig Rizell Carlson
Author Affiliation
Division for Health and Care, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. bodil.wilde@kau.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Feb;13(2):226-33
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Clinical Competence - standards
Community Health Nursing - standards
Comparative Study
Family - psychology
Female
Home Care Services - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Models, Psychological
Nursing Evaluation Research
Palliative Care - psychology - standards
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Advanced medical care in the patient's home setting is becoming more common. Many of the patients who receive this kind of care have severe illnesses and are unable to respond to questions about the quality of care. The research question was: are the patients' opinions congruent with those of family members? AIM: To explore and compare the relationship between patients' perception of the quality of care and close family members' perception of this care as well as their perception of the patients' perception. METHODS: Sixty-seven patients receiving advanced home care, 82 family members (54 matched patient + family member pairs) participated. Data were collected using a short version of the quality from the patient's perspective questionnaire modified to advanced home care. RESULTS: A high degree of perceptual congruence was found between patients and their family members. The similarity was also high between family members' own opinion and their appraisal of how the patient perceived the care. A subgroup of family members who met the patient once a week or less often deviated from this pattern. CONCLUSION: Patients' views on the quality of care are congruent with the opinions of family members if they meet every day (live together) and share the same everyday and care-related experiences. The results can be understood in the light of empathic accuracy theory. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings of this study have important implications for clinical nursing practice. Family members' perception of the quality of care may be a valuable data source for nurses in the case of advanced home care if the patient and family member share the same everyday, care-related experiences, otherwise family members' perception tend to be more critical than those of the patients themselves.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Nurs. 2004 Oct;13(7):906-7; discussion 90815361165
PubMed ID
14723675 View in PubMed
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Alaska nurse practitioners' barriers to use of prescription drug monitoring programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297608
Source
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract. 2018 Jan; 30(1):35-42
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Heath Christianson
Elizabeth Driscoll
Aicha Hull
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Services, Colorado Suncrest Hospice, Colorado Springs, Colorado.
Source
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract. 2018 Jan; 30(1):35-42
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Clinical Competence - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Nurse Practitioners - psychology - standards - statistics & numerical data
Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs - statistics & numerical data
Prescription Drugs - administration & dosage
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) have begun to demonstrate themselves as useful tools in enhancing safe and responsible prescription of controlled substances. The purpose of this project was to describe current practice, beliefs, and barriers of Alaska nurse practitioners (NPs) regarding the Alaska PDMP.
A questionnaire was sent to 635 Alaskan NPs with a 33% return rate. The data depicted prescribing habits, barriers to use, barriers to registering, and opinions on how to make the PDMP more clinically useful.
More attention is needed to maximize PDMP exposure and incorporation into daily workflow if it is to achieve full potential. Registered users should be able to delegate PDMP authority to select staff members to reduce time commitments and increase usage. Many providers felt that assigning unique patient identifiers could prevent consumers from filling prescriptions under aliases. Finally, an overwhelming majority of users wanted faster data entry and proactive reports.
This project explored the differences between PDMP users and nonusers and outlined NP suggestions for process improvement. A better understanding of PDMP use will aid providers in safe prescribing while curbing the prescription drug epidemic and ultimately reducing abuse, misuse, and death from overdose.
PubMed ID
29757920 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Nov 15;143(10):1097-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1990
Author
M J Ashley
J M Brewster
Y C Chow
J G Rankin
E. Single
H A Skinner
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Nov 15;143(10):1097-8
Date
Nov-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum - trends
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Humans
Leadership
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
PubMed ID
2224679 View in PubMed
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597 records – page 1 of 60.