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165 records – page 1 of 17.

[A course in USA put traces on professional life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143149
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Apr 28-May 4;107(17):1169-70
Publication Type
Article

Adapting the Key Features Examination for a clinical clerkship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191269
Source
Med Educ. 2002 Feb;36(2):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Rose Hatala
Geoffrey R Norman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Med Educ. 2002 Feb;36(2):160-5
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Clerkship - methods
Clinical Competence - standards
Decision Making
Educational Measurement - methods
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
A written test of clinical decision-making, the Key Features Examination, was developed for use in clerkship.
Following the guidelines provided by the Medical Council of Canada, a Key Features Examination was developed and implemented in an internal medicine clinical clerkship, during the 1998/99 clerkship year. The reliability and concurrent validity of the exam were assessed.
A 2 hour examination, containing 15 key feature problems, was administered to 101 students during 6 consecutive internal medicine clerkship rotations. The reliability of the exam, calculated from Cronbach's alpha, was 0.49. The exam had modest correlation with other measures of knowledge and clinical performance.
The Key Feature Examination is a feasible and reliable evaluation tool that may be implemented as a component of student assessment during a clinical clerkship.
PubMed ID
11869444 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory teaching: do approaches to learning predict the site and preceptor characteristics valued by clerks and residents in the ambulatory setting?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172409
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2005;5:35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
M Dianne Delva
Karen W Schultz
John R Kirby
Marshall Godwin
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. mdd2@post.queensu.ca
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2005;5:35
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Clerkship - organization & administration - standards
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Decision Making
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration - standards
Learning
Ontario
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
In a study to determine the site and preceptor characteristics most valued by clerks and residents in the ambulatory setting we wished to confirm whether these would support effective learning. The deep approach to learning is thought to be more effective for learning than surface approaches. In this study we determined how the approaches to learning of clerks and residents predicted the valued site and preceptor characteristics in the ambulatory setting.
Postal survey of all medical residents and clerks in training in Ontario determining the site and preceptor characteristics most valued in the ambulatory setting. Participants also completed the Workplace Learning questionnaire that includes 3 approaches to learning scales and 3 workplace climate scales. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict the preferred site and preceptor characteristics as the dependent variables by the average scores of the approaches to learning and perception of workplace climate scales as the independent variables.
There were 1642 respondents, yielding a 47.3% response rate. Factor analysis revealed 7 preceptor characteristics and 6 site characteristics valued in the ambulatory setting. The Deep approach to learning scale predicted all of the learners' preferred preceptor characteristics (beta = 0.076 to beta = 0.234, p
Notes
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Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2004 Aug 6;4:1215298710
PubMed ID
16225666 View in PubMed
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[A method of conducting practical work in pediatrics with students of the Chair of Therapeutics at a pediatric polyclinic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231525
Source
Pediatriia. 1989;(7):79-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989

Analytic global OSCE ratings are sensitive to level of training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182731
Source
Med Educ. 2003 Nov;37(11):1012-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Brian Hodges
Jodi Herold McIlroy
Author Affiliation
Wilson Centre for Research in Education, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. brian.hodges@uturonto.ca
Source
Med Educ. 2003 Nov;37(11):1012-6
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Clerkship - standards
Clinical Competence - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Educational Measurement - methods
Humans
Psychometrics - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
There are several reasons for using global ratings in addition to checklists for scoring objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) stations. However, there has been little evidence collected regarding the validity of these scales. This study assessed the construct validity of an analytic global rating with 4 component subscales: empathy, coherence, verbal and non-verbal expression.
A total of 19 Year 3 and 38 Year 4 clinical clerks were scored on content checklists and these global ratings during a 10-station OSCE. T-tests were used to assess differences between groups for overall checklist and global scores, and for each of the 4 subscales.
The mean global rating was significantly higher for senior clerks (75.5% versus 71.3%, t55 = 2.12, P
PubMed ID
14629415 View in PubMed
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[A new wave of internship applications from foreign students].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279789
Source
Lakartidningen. 2016 03 07;113
Publication Type
Article
Date
03-07-2016

An obstetric and gynecologic clerkship's influence on a medical community. The Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho Anchorage obstetric and gynecologic clerkship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4545
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Jun;176(6):1363-5; discussion 1366-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
H B Hanson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington Medical School, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Jun;176(6):1363-5; discussion 1366-7
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Clinical Clerkship
Communication
Community Health Services - standards
Consultants
Education, Medical - standards
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Idaho
Montana
Obstetrics - education
Perception
Pregnancy
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Rural Health Services - standards
Washington
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Our purpose was to explore the influences of an obstetric and gynecologic medical student clerkship on a remote medical community. Return of physicians to Alaska and faculty perceptions of their experience were central foci. STUDY DESIGN: Data were obtained on former clerks to determine choice of specialty and location of practice. Data regarding all physicians new to Alaska was correlated with the University of Washington Medical School graduate data. Additionally, a questionnaire with a Likert-type scale evaluated the 10 clinical faculty members participating in the clerkship. RESULTS: Between 1978 and 1991 we trained 266 clerks. A total of 77 of 374 (21%) new physicians in Alaska (1978 to 1991) were graduates of the University of Washington; 26 of those 77 (34%) were our former Anchorage obstetrics and gynecology clerks. The clinical faculty reported both positive and negative effects of their participation in the clerkship. CONCLUSION: The desired benefit, the return of new physicians to Alaska, seemed supported. Questionnaire results hinted at additional benefits for the supervising faculty physicians in this isolated community. The formal affiliation effected by the clerkship seemed to have a positive impact on patient care, communication, consultation, and shared action among the participating physicians.
PubMed ID
9215198 View in PubMed
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An overview of pedagogy and organisation in clinical interprofessional training units in Sweden and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281024
Source
J Interprof Care. 2016;30(2):156-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Flemming Jakobsen
Source
J Interprof Care. 2016;30(2):156-64
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Clerkship - organization & administration
Clinical Competence
Denmark
Goals
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Professional Role
Sweden
Teaching - organization & administration
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the organization and pedagogy in Swedish and Danish interprofessional training units (ITUs) and to synthesize empirical findings from Swedish and Danish ITUs published in peer review journals. A questionnaire concerning organization and pedagogy was sent to twenty Swedish and Danish ITUs. After a bibliographic search aimed to find empirical studies from ITUs, twenty Swedish and eight Danish studies were included in the review. The questionnaires results showed that despite different wording, the overall aims for the ITUs were to provide students with the possibility of uniprofessional learning, interprofessional learning, and strengthening of professional identity. Furthermore, it appeared that there were different organizational and pedagogical approaches. The review revealed that differences in clinical tutors' affiliation and presence in the ITU were challenging. Also different pedagogical approaches were discussed. However, all articles showed that the goals for the ITUs in general were fulfilled. There is basis therefore to recommend the establishment of future clinical ITUs with the patient in the core and with the use of a student activating approach.
PubMed ID
26954361 View in PubMed
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Are we there yet? Preparing Canadian medical students for global health electives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128571
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Feb;87(2):206-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Kelly C Anderson
Michael A Slatnik
Ian Pereira
Eileen Cheung
Kunyong Xu
Timothy F Brewer
Author Affiliation
St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Ontario, Canada. kelly.anderson@utoronto.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Feb;87(2):206-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Clerkship - methods
Developing Countries
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - methods
Faculty, Medical
Health Surveys
Humans
Schools, Medical
Students, Medical
World Health - education
Abstract
To understand the current landscape and the evolution of predeparture training (PDT) in Canadian medical education.
The authors surveyed one faculty and one student global health leader at each of Canada's 17 medical schools in February 2008 and May 2010 to assess the delivery of and requirements for PDT at each institution. The authors then used descriptive statistics to compare responses across schools and years.
In 2008, one faculty and one student representative from each of the 17 Canadian medical schools completed the survey; in 2010, 17 faculty and 16 student representatives responded. The number of medical schools offering PDT grew substantially from 2008 to 2010 (11/17 [65%] versus 16/17 [94%]). Three of the five new programs in 2010 were student run. The number of schools with mandatory PDT nearly doubled (6/17 [35%] versus 11/17 [65%]). However, institutional funding remained scarce, as 10 of 16 programs had budgets of less than $500 in 2010. PDT content, frequency, and format varied from school to school.
Medical students have been responsible for organizing the majority of new PDT. To ensure quality and sustainability, however, faculty must play a more central role in the planning and implementation of such training programs. Medical schools must continue to reevaluate how best to maximize global health electives for trainees and the communities in which they study. PDT offers one avenue for schools to ensure that students are safe and socially accountable during their time abroad.
PubMed ID
22189881 View in PubMed
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Assessing the mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise in comparison to a national specialty examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167406
Source
Med Educ. 2006 Oct;40(10):950-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Rose Hatala
Martha Ainslie
Barry O Kassen
Iain Mackie
J Mark Roberts
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Canada. rhatala@mac.com
Source
Med Educ. 2006 Oct;40(10):950-6
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Clinical Clerkship - standards
Clinical Competence - standards
Female
General Surgery - education
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
To evaluate the reliability and validity of the Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (mini-CEX) for postgraduate year 4 (PGY-4) internal medicine trainees compared to a high-stakes assessment of clinical competence, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada Comprehensive Examination in Internal Medicine (RCPSC IM examination).
Twenty-two PGY-4 residents at the University of British Columbia and the University of Calgary were evaluated, during the 6 months preceding their 2004 RCPSC IM examination, with a mean of 5.5 mini-CEX encounters (range 3-6). Experienced Royal College examiners from each site travelled to the alternate university to assess the encounters.
The mini-CEX encounters assessed a broad range of internal medicine patient problems. The inter-encounter reliability for the residents' mean mini-CEX overall clinical competence score was 0.74. The attenuated correlation between residents' mini-CEX overall clinical competence score and their 2004 RCPSC IM oral examination score was 0.59 (P = 0.01).
By examining multiple sources of validity evidence, this study suggests that the mini-CEX provides a reliable and valid assessment of clinical competence for PGY-4 trainees in internal medicine.
PubMed ID
16987184 View in PubMed
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165 records – page 1 of 17.