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Adapting to the effects of climate change on Inuit health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104452
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Adapting to the Effects of Climate Change on Inuit Health Climate change will have far-reaching implications for Inuit health. Focusing on adaptation offers a pro- active approach for manag- ing climate-related health risks—one that views Inuit populationsasactiveagents in planning and
  1 document  
Author
James D Ford
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Susan Chatwood
Christopher Furgal
Sherilee Harper
Ian Mauro
Tristan Pearce
Author Affiliation
James D. Ford is with the Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. Ashlee Cunsolo Willox is with the Department of Community Health, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia. Susan Chatwood is with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Christopher Furgal is with the Department of Indigenous Environmental Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario. Sherilee Harper is with the Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Ontario. Ian Mauro is with the Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Tristan Pearce is with the University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydor, Queensland, Australia.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
924997
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate change
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Climate change will have far-reaching implications for Inuit health. Focusing on adaptation offers a proactive approach for managing climate-related health risks-one that views Inuit populations as active agents in planning and responding at household, community, and regional levels. Adaptation can direct attention to the root causes of climate vulnerability and emphasize the importance of traditional knowledge regarding environmental change and adaptive strategies. An evidence base on adaptation options and processes for Inuit regions is currently lacking, however, thus constraining climate policy development. In this article, we tackled this deficit, drawing upon our understanding of the determinants of health vulnerability to climate change in Canada to propose key considerations for adaptation decision-making in an Inuit context.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24754615 View in PubMed
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Community-based adaptation research in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276482
Source
Wiley Interdiscip Rev Clim Change. 2016 Mar-Apr;7(2):175-191
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
emerged over the last decade as an approach to empowering communities to plan for and cope with the impacts of climate change. While such approaches have been widely advocated, few have critically examined the tensions and challenges that CBA brings. Responding to this gap, this article critically
  1 document  
Author
James D Ford
Ellie Stephenson
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Victoria Edge
Khosrow Farahbakhsh
Christopher Furgal
Sherilee Harper
Susan Chatwood
Ian Mauro
Tristan Pearce
Stephanie Austin
Anna Bunce
Alejandra Bussalleu
Jahir Diaz
Kaitlyn Finner
Allan Gordon
Catherine Huet
Knut Kitching
Marie-Pierre Lardeau
Graham McDowell
Ellen McDonald
Lesya Nakoneczny
Mya Sherman
Source
Wiley Interdiscip Rev Clim Change. 2016 Mar-Apr;7(2):175-191
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
191611
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Adaptation
Communities
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
Community-based adaptation (CBA) has emerged over the last decade as an approach to empowering communities to plan for and cope with the impacts of climate change. While such approaches have been widely advocated, few have critically examined the tensions and challenges that CBA brings. Responding to this gap, this article critically examines the use of CBA approaches with Inuit communities in Canada. We suggest that CBA holds significant promise to make adaptation research more democratic and responsive to local needs, providing a basis for developing locally appropriate adaptations based on local/indigenous and Western knowledge. Yet, we argue that CBA is not a panacea, and its common portrayal as such obscures its limitations, nuances, and challenges. Indeed, if uncritically adopted, CBA can potentially lead to maladaptation, may be inappropriate in some instances, can legitimize outside intervention and control, and may further marginalize communities. We identify responsibilities for researchers engaging in CBA work to manage these challenges, emphasizing the centrality of how knowledge is generated, the need for project flexibility and openness to change, and the importance of ensuring partnerships between researchers and communities are transparent. Researchers also need to be realistic about what CBA can achieve, and should not assume that research has a positive role to play in community adaptation just because it utilizes participatory approaches. WIREs Clim Change 2016, 7:175-191. doi: 10.1002/wcc.376 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.
PubMed ID
27668014 View in PubMed
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Mapping human dimensions of climate change research in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122320
Source
Ambio. 2012 Dec;41(8):808-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
REVIEW PAPER Mapping Human Dimensions of Climate Change Research in the Canadian Arctic James D. Ford, Kenyon Bolton, Jamal Shirley, Tristan Pearce, Martin Tremblay, Michael Westlake Received: 16 September 2011 / Revised: 8 May 2012 / Accepted: 20 June 2012 / Published online: 25 July 2012
  1 document  
Author
James D Ford
Kenyon Bolton
Jamal Shirley
Tristan Pearce
Martin Tremblay
Michael Westlake
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. James.ford@mcgill.ca
Source
Ambio. 2012 Dec;41(8):808-22
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
622729
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate change
Humans
Inuits
Abstract
This study maps current understanding and research trends on the human dimensions of climate change (HDCC) in the eastern and central Canadian Arctic. Developing a systematic literature review methodology, 117 peer reviewed articles are identified and examined using quantitative and qualitative methods. The research highlights the rapid expansion of HDCC studies over the last decade. Early scholarship was dominated by work documenting Inuit observations of climate change, with research employing vulnerability concepts and terminology now common. Adaptation studies which seek to identify and evaluate opportunities to reduce vulnerability to climate change and take advantage of new opportunities remain in their infancy. Over the last 5 years there has been an increase social science-led research, with many studies employing key principles of community-based research. We currently have baseline understanding of climate change impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability in the region, but key gaps are evident. Future research needs to target significant geographic disparities in understanding, consider risks and opportunities posed by climate change outside of the subsistence hunting sector, complement case study research with regional analyses, and focus on identifying and characterizing sustainable and feasible adaptation interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22829324 View in PubMed
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