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Assessing the impacts of local knowledge and technology on climate change vulnerability in remote communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134649
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Mar;8(3):733-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Christopher Bone
Lilian Alessa
Mark Altaweel
Andrew Kliskey
Richard Lammers
Author Affiliation
Resilience and Adaptive Management Group, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3101 Science Circle, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. Christopher.Bone@nrcan.gc.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Mar;8(3):733-61
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Climate
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Environment
Humans
Knowledge
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Rural Population
Technology
Water supply
Young Adult
Abstract
The introduction of new technologies into small remote communities can alter how individuals acquire knowledge about their surrounding environment. This is especially true when technologies that satisfy basic needs, such as freshwater use, create a distance (i.e., diminishing exposure) between individuals and their environment. However, such distancing can potentially be countered by the transfer of local knowledge between community members and from one generation to the next. The objective of this study is to simulate by way of agent-based modeling the tensions between technology-induced distancing and local knowledge that are exerted on community vulnerability to climate change. A model is developed that simulates how a collection of individual perceptions about changes to climatic-related variables manifest into community perceptions, how perceptions are influenced by the movement away from traditional resource use, and how the transmission of knowledge mitigates the potentially adverse effects of technology-induced distancing. The model is implemented utilizing climate and social data for two remote communities located on the Seward Peninsula in western Alaska. The agent-based model simulates a set of scenarios that depict different ways in which these communities may potentially engage with their natural resources, utilize knowledge transfer, and develop perceptions of how the local climate is different from previous years. A loosely-coupled pan-arctic climate model simulates changes monthly changes to climatic variables. The discrepancy between the perceptions derived from the agent-based model and the projections simulated by the climate model represent community vulnerability. The results demonstrate how demographics, the communication of knowledge and the types of 'knowledge-providers' influence community perception about changes to their local climate.
Notes
Cites: J Environ Manage. 2010 Aug;91(8):1718-2920417023
PubMed ID
21556176 View in PubMed
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Awareness of climate change and the dietary choices of young adults in Finland: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263458
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e97480
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Essi A E Korkala
Timo T Hugg
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e97480
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Climate Change - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys - methods
Female
Finland
Food Preferences - psychology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Climate change is a major public health threat that is exacerbated by food production. Food items differ substantially in the amount of greenhouse gases their production generates and therefore individuals, if willing, can mitigate climate change through dietary choices. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study to assess if the understanding of climate change, concern over climate change or socio-economic characteristics are reflected in the frequencies of climate-friendly food choices. The study population comprised 1623 young adults in Finland who returned a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 64.0%). We constructed a Climate-Friendly Diet Score (CFDS) ranging theoretically from -14 to 14 based on the consumption of 14 food items. A higher CFDS indicated a climate-friendlier diet. Multivariate linear regression analyses on the determinants of CFDS revealed that medium concern raised CFDS on average by 0.51 points (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03, 0.98) and high concern by 1.30 points (95% CI 0.80, 1.80) compared to low concern. Understanding had no effect on CFDS on its own. Female gender raised CFDS by 1.92 (95% CI 1.59, 2.25). Unemployment decreased CFDS by 0.92 (95% CI -1.68, -0.15). Separate analyses of genders revealed that high concern over climate change brought about a greater increase in CFDS in females than in males. Good understanding of climate change was weakly connected to climate-friendly diet among females only. Our results indicate that increasing awareness of climate change could lead to increased consumption of climate-friendly food, reduction in GHG emissions, and thus climate change mitigation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24824363 View in PubMed
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Climate change and consequences in the Arctic: perception of climate change by the Nenets people of Vaigach Island.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129581
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:69-73.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Climate change and consequences in the Arctic: perception of climate change by the Nenets people of Vaigach Island Alexander N. Davydov* and Galina V. Mikhailova Institute of Ecological Problems of the North, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Arkhangelsk, Russia Background: Arctic
  1 document  
Author
Alexander N Davydov
Galina V Mikhailova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Ecological Problems of the North, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Arkhangelsk, Russia. davydov@arh.ru
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:69-73.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
File Size
335227
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Husbandry
Animal Migration
Animals
Arctic Regions
Child
Child, Preschool
Climate change
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Perception
Population Groups - psychology
Public Health
Public Opinion
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reindeer
Seasons
Young Adult
Abstract
Arctic climate change is already having a significant impact on the environment, economic activity, and public health. For the northern peoples, traditions and cultural identity are closely related to the natural environment so any change will have consequences for society in several ways.
A questionnaire was given to the population on the Vaigach island, the Nenets who rely to a large degree on hunting, fishing and reindeer herding for survival. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted about perception of climate change.
Climate change is observed and has already had an impact on daily life according to more than 50% of the respondents. The winter season is now colder and longer and the summer season colder and shorter. A decrease in standard of living was noticeable but few were planning to leave.
Climate change has been noticed in the region and it has a negative impact on the standard of living for the Nenets. However, as of yet they do not want to leave as cultural identity is important for their overall well-being.
PubMed ID
22091216 View in PubMed
Documents

Davydov-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Consumer consciousness on meat and the environment - Exploring differences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279638
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jun 01;101:37-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2016
Author
Pasi Pohjolainen
Petri Tapio
Markus Vinnari
Pekka Jokinen
Pekka Räsänen
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jun 01;101:37-45
Date
Jun-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Choice Behavior
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Consumer Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Female
Finland
Food Preferences
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Global environmental challenges require changes in both the production and the consumption of goods. In this paper we analyse how consumers perceive the high environmental burden of meat. We analysed consumer environmental consciousness, including problem awareness and a support to action dimensions, latter including perceived self-efficacy as well as solutions to problems. The solutions were positioned on a continuum from increasing the efficiency of production to discussing sufficiency levels in consumption practices (techno-optimism, local meat, organic meat and meat reduction, respectively). We used a statistically representative survey sample (n = 1890) from the population of Finland and cluster analysis to explore differences among consumers. The analysis revealed that most Finns seem to be rather unsure of the study topic. At the same time they tend to have a comparably high level of self-efficacy (55 per cent of respondents) and endorsement of particularly local meat solution type (55%), followed by organic meat (35%), meat reduction (25%) and techno-optimism (15%), though the neutral stand was the most common one across the data. We also identified six consumer groups that reveal not only a high number of Highly unsure consumers (40%), but also some Rather conscious (20%) and a relatively small number of Highly conscious (8%). In addition, there were also easily observable groups of Careless conscious (14%), Rather unsure (9%) and Resistant (8%). The results highlight the need for a multitude of political actions to guide meat consumption, as there are groups that may benefit from practical tools for making dietary changes as well as groups in need for more comprehensive selection of measures, including environmental information.
PubMed ID
26873454 View in PubMed
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Exploring the relationship between nature sounds, connectedness to nature, mood and willingness to buy sustainable food: A retail field experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278119
Source
Appetite. 2016 May 01;100:133-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-01-2016
Author
Sara Spendrup
Erik Hunter
Ellinor Isgren
Source
Appetite. 2016 May 01;100:133-41
Date
May-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Climate Change - economics
Conservation of Natural Resources - economics
Consumer Behavior
Cues
Female
Food Labeling - economics
Food Preferences
Food, Organic - economics
Humans
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Nature
Pleasure
Sound
Sweden
Wilderness
Young Adult
Abstract
Nature sounds are increasingly used by some food retailers to enhance in-store ambiance and potentially even influence sustainable food choices. An in-store, 2 × 3 between-subject full factorial experiment conducted on 627 customers over 12 days tested whether nature sound directly and indirectly influenced willingness to buy (WTB) sustainable foods. The results show that nature sounds positively and directly influence WTB organic foods in groups of customers (men) that have relatively low initial intentions to buy. Indirectly, we did not find support for the effect of nature sound on influencing mood or connectedness to nature (CtN). However, we show that information on the product's sustainability characteristics moderates the relationship between CtN and WTB in certain groups. Namely, when CtN is high, sustainability information positively moderated WTB both organic and climate friendly foods in men. Conversely, when CtN was low, men expressed lower WTB organic and climate friendly foods than identical, albeit conventionally labelled products. Consequently, our study concludes that nature sounds might be an effective, yet subtle in-store tool to use on groups of consumers who might otherwise respond negatively to more overt forms of sustainable food information.
PubMed ID
26876909 View in PubMed
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Facing the limit of resilience: perceptions of climate change among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130013
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 11-21.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Facing the limit of resilience: perceptions of climate change among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden Maria Furberg1,2*, Birgitta Evengård1,2 and Maria Nilsson2 1Division of Infectious diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 2Umeå Centre for Global Health
  1 document  
Author
Maria Furberg
Birgitta Evengård
Maria Nilsson
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 11-21.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
501926
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Husbandry - methods - trends
Animals
Climate change
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - psychology
Reindeer
Seasons
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Young Adult
Sami
Perception
Abstract
The Arctic area is a part of the globe where the increase in global temperature has had the earliest noticeable effect and indigenous peoples, including the Swedish reindeer herding Sami, are amongst the first to be affected by these changes.
To explore the experiences and perceptions of climate change among Swedish reindeer herding Sami.
In-depth interviews with 14 Swedish reindeer herding Sami were performed, with purposive sampling. The interviews focused on the herders experiences of climate change, observed consequences and thoughts about this. The interviews were analysed using content analysis.
One core theme emerged from the interviews: facing the limit of resilience. Swedish reindeer-herding Sami perceive climate change as yet another stressor in their daily struggle. They have experienced severe and more rapidly shifting, unstable weather with associated changes in vegetation and alterations in the freeze-thaw cycle, all of which affect reindeer herding. The forecasts about climate change from authorities and scientists have contributed to stress and anxiety. Other societal developments have lead to decreased flexibility that obstructs adaptation. Some adaptive strategies are discordant with the traditional life of reindeer herding, and there is a fear among the Sami of being the last generation practising traditional reindeer herding.
The study illustrates the vulnerable situation of the reindeer herders and that climate change impact may have serious consequences for the trade and their overall way of life. Decision makers on all levels, both in Sweden and internationally, need improved insights into these complex issues to be able to make adequate decisions about adaptive climate change strategies.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2005 Jun;34(3):623-915737965
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
PubMed ID
22043218 View in PubMed
Documents
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"From this place and of this place:" climate change, sense of place, and health in Nunatsiavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124293
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Sherilee L Harper
James D Ford
Karen Landman
Karen Houle
Victoria L Edge
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Design & Rural Development, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1. ashlee@uoguelph.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Climate change
Emotions
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Health - ethnology
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Nunavut - epidemiology
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
As climate change impacts are felt around the globe, people are increasingly exposed to changes in weather patterns, wildlife and vegetation, and water and food quality, access and availability in their local regions. These changes can impact human health and well-being in a variety of ways: increased risk of foodborne and waterborne diseases; increased frequency and distribution of vector-borne disease; increased mortality and injury due to extreme weather events and heat waves; increased respiratory and cardiovascular disease due to changes in air quality and increased allergens in the air; and increased susceptibility to mental and emotional health challenges. While climate change is a global phenomenon, the impacts are experienced most acutely in place; as such, a sense of place, place-attachment, and place-based identities are important indicators for climate-related health and adaptation. Representing one of the first qualitative case studies to examine the connections among climate change, a changing sense of place, and health in an Inuit context, this research draws data from a multi-year community-driven case study situated in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, Canada. Data informing this paper were drawn from the narrative analysis of 72 in-depth interviews conducted from November 2009 to October 2010, as well as from the descriptive analysis of 112 questionnaires from a survey in October 2010 (95% response rate). The findings illustrated that climate change is negatively affecting feelings of place attachment by disrupting hunting, fishing, foraging, trapping, and traveling, and changing local landscapes-changes which subsequently impact physical, mental, and emotional health and well-being. These results also highlight the need to develop context-specific climate-health planning and adaptation programs, and call for an understanding of place-attachment as a vital indicator of health and well-being and for climate change to be framed as an important determinant of health.
PubMed ID
22595069 View in PubMed
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Investigating environmental determinants of injury and trauma in the Canadian north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260526
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Feb;11(2):1536-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Agata Durkalec
Chris Furgal
Mark W Skinner
Tom Sheldon
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Feb;11(2):1536-48
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Female
Humans
Ice Cover
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Rescue Work - trends
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Unintentional injury and trauma rates are disproportionately high in Inuit regions, and environmental changes are predicted to exacerbate injury rates. However, there is a major gap in our understanding of the risk factors contributing to land-based injury and trauma in the Arctic. We investigated the role of environmental and other factors in search and rescue (SAR) incidents in a remote Inuit community in northern Canada using a collaborative mixed methods approach. We analyzed SAR records from 1995 to 2010 and conducted key consultant interviews in 2010 and 2011. Data showed an estimated annual SAR incidence rate of 19 individuals per 1,000. Weather and ice conditions were the most frequent contributing factor for cases. In contrast with other studies, intoxication was the least common factor associated with SAR incidents. The incidence rate was six times higher for males than females, while land-users aged 26-35 had the highest incidence rate among age groups. Thirty-four percent of individuals sustained physical health impacts. Results demonstrate that environmental conditions are critical factors contributing to physical health risk in Inuit communities, particularly related to travel on sea ice during winter. Age and gender are important risk factors. This knowledge is vital for informing management of land-based physical health risk given rapidly changing environmental conditions in the Arctic.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24477214 View in PubMed
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It can become 5 °C warmer: The extremity effect in climate forecasts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296899
Source
J Exp Psychol Appl. 2018 03; 24(1):3-17
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Karl Halvor Teigen
Petra Filkuková
Sigrid Møyner Hohle
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo.
Source
J Exp Psychol Appl. 2018 03; 24(1):3-17
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Climate change
Communication
Comprehension
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Probability
Semantics
Uncertainty
Young Adult
Abstract
Climate projections and other predictions are often described as outcomes that can happen, indicating possibilities that are imaginable, but uncertain. Whereas the meanings of other uncertainty terms have been extensively studied, the uses of modal verbs like can and will have rarely been examined. Participants in five experiments were shown graphs and verbal statements showing projections of future global warming, sea level rise, and other climate-related issues. All studies gave support for the extremity hypothesis, which states that people use can-statements to describe the topmost values in a distribution of outcomes, regardless of their actual probabilities. Despite their extremity, outcomes that can happen are believed to have a substantial likelihood of occurrence. The extremity effect was replicated in 2 languages (Norwegian and English), and with several related terms (can, possible, could, and may). The combination of extremity and exaggerated likelihood conveyed by such statements could lead to serious miscommunications. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
29431463 View in PubMed
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Making the links: do we connect climate change with health? A qualitative case study from Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115551
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:208
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Francesca S Cardwell
Susan J Elliott
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography and Environmental Management, Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, Canada. fcardwel@uwaterloo.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:208
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Climate change
Environmental health
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Public Opinion
Qualitative Research
Risk assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
Climate change has been described as the biggest global health threat of the 21st century. Typically framed as an environmental issue, some suggest this view has contributed to public ambivalence and hence a lack of public engagement. The lack of understanding of climate change as a significant environmental health risk on the part of the lay public represents a significant barrier to behaviour change. We therefore need to think about reframing the impact of climate change from an environmental to a health issue. This paper builds on calls for increased understanding of the public's views of human health risks associated with climate change, focusing on facilitators and barriers to behaviour change.
Semi-structured in-depth interviews (n?=?22) with residents of the Golden Horseshoe region of Southern Ontario were conducted between August 2010 and January 2011. Topics included individual and community health, climate change, and facilitators and barriers to behaviour change.
Few participants recognized the role of the environment in the context of either individual and community health. When asked about health concerns specific to their community, however, environmental issues were mentioned frequently. Health effects as possible impacts of global environmental change were mentioned by 77% of participants when prompted, but this link was not described in great detail or within the context of impacting their communities or themselves. Participants were willing to act in environmentally friendly ways, and possible incentives to undertake behaviour change such as decreasing cost were described. Health co-benefits were not identified as incentives to engaging in mitigative or adaptive behaviours.
The results support recent calls for reframing the impact of climate change from an environmental to a public health issue in order to increase public engagement in adaptive and mitigative behaviour change. While previous research has touched on public awareness of the human health risks of climate change, we have further explored the attitude-action link through the examination of facilitators and barriers to behaviour change.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23496814 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.