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American Public Health Association (APHA): Climate Change Section

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288400
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
American Public Health Association (APHA)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Climate change
Drinking Water
Weather
Abstract
APHA is concerned with the public health implications of climate change-from changes in vector-borne diseases to impacts on drinking water supply to extreme weather events.
Online Resources
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An analysis of specialist and non-specialist user requirements for geographic climate change information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114159
Source
Appl Ergon. 2013 Nov;44(6):874-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Martin C Maguire
Author Affiliation
Loughborough Design School, Loughborough University, Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK. m.c.maguire@lboro.ac.uk
Source
Appl Ergon. 2013 Nov;44(6):874-85
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Congresses as topic
Data Collection
Environmental monitoring
Europe
Faculty
Geographic Information Systems
Government Agencies
Humans
Needs Assessment
Research Personnel
Weather
Abstract
The EU EuroClim project developed a system to monitor and record climate change indicator data based on satellite observations of snow cover, sea ice and glaciers in Northern Europe and the Arctic. It also contained projection data for temperature, rainfall and average wind speed for Europe. These were all stored as data sets in a GIS database for users to download. The process of gathering requirements for a user population including scientists, researchers, policy makers, educationalists and the general public is described. Using an iterative design methodology, a user survey was administered to obtain initial feedback on the system concept followed by panel sessions where users were presented with the system concept and a demonstrator to interact with it. The requirements of both specialist and non-specialist users is summarised together with strategies for the effective communication of geographic climate change information.
PubMed ID
23642475 View in PubMed
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Association of climatic factors with infectious diseases in the Arctic and subarctic region--a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260450
Source
Glob Health Action. 2014;7:24161
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christina Hedlund
Yulia Blomstedt
Barbara Schumann
Source
Glob Health Action. 2014;7:24161
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Climate
Climate change
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Weather
Abstract
The Arctic and subarctic area are likely to be highly affected by climate change, with possible impacts on human health due to effects on food security and infectious diseases.
To investigate the evidence for an association between climatic factors and infectious diseases, and to identify the most climate-sensitive diseases and vulnerable populations in the Arctic and subarctic region.
A systematic review was conducted. A search was made in PubMed, with the last update in May 2013. Inclusion criteria included human cases of infectious disease as outcome, climate or weather factor as exposure, and Arctic or subarctic areas as study origin. Narrative reviews, case reports, and projection studies were excluded. Abstracts and selected full texts were read and evaluated by two independent readers. A data collection sheet and an adjusted version of the SIGN methodology checklist were used to assess the quality grade of each article.
In total, 1953 abstracts were initially found, of which finally 29 articles were included. Almost half of the studies were carried out in Canada (n=14), the rest from Sweden (n=6), Finland (n=4), Norway (n=2), Russia (n=2), and Alaska, US (n=1). Articles were analyzed by disease group: food- and waterborne diseases, vector-borne diseases, airborne viral- and airborne bacterial diseases. Strong evidence was found in our review for an association between climatic factors and food- and waterborne diseases. The scientific evidence for a link between climate and specific vector- and rodent-borne diseases was weak due to that only a few diseases being addressed in more than one publication, although several articles were of very high quality. Air temperature and humidity seem to be important climatic factors to investigate further for viral- and bacterial airborne diseases, but from our results no conclusion about a causal relationship could be drawn.
More studies of high quality are needed to investigate the adverse health impacts of weather and climatic factors in the Arctic and subarctic region. No studies from Greenland or Iceland were found, and only a few from Siberia and Alaska. Disease and syndromic surveillance should be part of climate change adaptation measures in the Arctic and subarctic regions, with monitoring of extreme weather events known to pose a risk for certain infectious diseases implemented at the community level.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24990685 View in PubMed
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[Climate change and hygienic assessment of weather conditions in Omsk and the Omsk Region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101808
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Nov-Dec;(6):18-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Zh V Gudinova
I S Akimova
A V Klochikhina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Nov-Dec;(6):18-20
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate change
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Hygiene
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Siberia
Weather
Abstract
The paper deals with trends in climate change in the Omsk Region: the increases in average annual air temperatures and rainfall, which are attended by the higher number of abnormal weather events, as shown by the data of the Omsk Regional Board, Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring. There is information on weather severity in 2008: there was mild weather in spring and severe weather in winter, in January in particular. A survey of physicians has revealed that medical workers are concerned about climate problems and global warming and ascertained weather events mostly affecting the population's health. People worry most frequently about a drastic temperature drop or rise (as high as 71%), atmospheric pressure change (53%), and "when it is too hot in summer (47%).
PubMed ID
21381358 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
U.S. National Library of Medicine
Language
English
Spanish
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Climate change
Cold Temperature
Floods
Hot Temperature
Asthma
Mental health
Weather
Climate
Air Pollution
Abstract
Informative materials from The National Library of Medicine.
Online Resources
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Climate change: the next challenge for public mental health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262713
Source
Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):415-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
François Bourque
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Source
Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):415-22
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Climate change
Disasters
Droughts
Environment
Floods
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Mental health
Public Health
Weather
Abstract
Climate change is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to human health of the 21st century, with consequences that mental health professionals are also likely to face. While physical health impacts have been increasingly emphasized in literature and practice, recent scholarly literature indicates that climate change and related weather events and environmental changes can profoundly impact psychological well-being and mental health through both direct and indirect pathways, particularly among those with pre-existing vulnerabilities or those living in ecologically sensitive areas. Although knowledge is still limited about the connections between climate change and mental health, evidence is indicating that impacts may be felt at both the individual and community levels, with mental health outcomes ranging from psychological distress, depression and anxiety, to increased addictions and suicide rates. Drawing on examples from diverse geographical areas, this article highlights some climate-sensitive impacts that may be encountered by mental health professionals. We then suggest potential avenues for public mental health in light of current and projected changes, in order to stimulate thought, debate, and action.
PubMed ID
25137107 View in PubMed
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Initial findings from the implementation of a community-based sentinel surveillance system to assess the health effects of climate change in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107660
Source
Pages 946-954 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):946-954
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
RESEARCH IN THE NORTH Initial findings from the implementation of a community-based sentinel surveillance system to assess the health effects of climate change in Alaska David L. Driscoll1*, Tenaya Sunbury1, Janet Johnston 1 and Sue Renes2 1 Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies
  1 document  
Author
David L Driscoll
Tenaya Sunbury
Janet Johnston
Sue Renes
Author Affiliation
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Pages 946-954 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):946-954
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Climate Change - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sentinel Surveillance
Weather
Abstract
This report describes the results of a study to determine whether a community-based sentinel surveillance system can be developed and implemented to assess the health effects of climate change, and to contribute to local discussions to mitigate these health effects. The purpose of this report is to describe the process and outcomes of this innovative approach to identifying priority areas for adaptation investment. This report can be used to assist local, state and federal governments in determining how to develop actions and policies to promote adaptation to climate change.
To evaluate the health effects of climate change in rural Alaska.
We conducted an iterative and participatory process to develop metrics, an instrument and a protocol to collect sentinel surveillance data on the health effects of climate change in 3 ecologically distinct regions of the state.
We collected surveillance data from 91 study participants over the course of 12 months. These data were analyzed and categorized by frequency and association between specific health outcomes or health-related factors (such as food security) and reported exposure to environmental effects of climate change. We found significant associations between several health outcomes and health outcome mediators and reported exposures. We presented these data to study participants in community settings and moderated discussions of likely causal factors for these measured associations, and helped community residents to identify specific adaption measures to mitigate those health effects.
We conclude that community-based sentinel surveillance is an effective method for assessing health outcomes from exposure to environmental effects of climate change, and informing climate change health adaptation planning in Alaskan communities. We contend that it would be effective in other regions of the nation as well.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Jan 7;291(1):99-10314709582
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-4722595069
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2011 Feb;40(2):183-9021238867
PubMed ID
23986899 View in PubMed
Documents
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Observations of environmental changes and potential dietary impacts in two communities in Nunavut, Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96604
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1370
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Nancarrow, TL
Chan, HM
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, Canada. tanyanancarrow@yahoo.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1370
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptations
Canadian Arctic
Climate change
Elders
Hunting, fishing, and gathering
Inuit
Observations
Species
Subsistence living
Weather
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Inuit from communities across the Arctic are still existing in subsistence living. Hunting, fishing and gathering is an important part of the culture and the harvested 'country food' provides sources of nutrients invaluable to maintaining the health of the populations. However, Inuit are voicing their concerns on how observed climate change is impacting on their traditional life. The objective of this study was to report on observed climate changes and how they affect the country food harvest in two communities in the Canadian Arctic. The nutritional implications of these changes are discussed and also how the communities need to plan for adaptations. METHODS: A total of 17 adult participants from Repulse Bay and Kugaaruk, Nunavut were invited to participate. Participants were selected using purposeful sampling methods selecting the most knowledgeable community members for the study. Inuit Elders, hunters, processors of the animals, and other community members above the age of 18 years were selected for their knowledge of harvesting and the environment. Two-day bilingual focus groups using semi-directed, unstructured questions were held in each community to discuss perceived climate changes related to the access and availability of key species. Key topics of focus included ice, snow, weather, marine mammals, land mammals, fish, species ranges, migration patterns, and quality and quantity of animal populations. Maps were used to pinpoint harvesting locations. A qualitative analysis categorizing strategy was used for analysis of data. This strategy involves coding data in order to form themes and to allow for cross-comparison analysis between communities. Each major animal represented a category; other categories included land, sea, and weather. Results were verified by the participants and community leaders. RESULTS: Three themes emerged from the observations: (1) ice/snow/water; (2) weather; and (3) changes in species. Climate change can affect the accessibility and availability of the key species of country foods including caribou, marine mammals, fish, birds and plants. Various observations on relationship between weather and population health and distributions of the animal/plant species were reported. While many of the observations were common between the two communities, many were community specific and inconsistent. Participants from both communities found that climate change was affecting the country food harvest in both positive and negative ways. Key nutrients that could be affected are protein, iron, zinc, n-3 fatty acids, selenium and vitamins D and A. CONCLUSION: Community members from Repulse Bay and Kugaaruk have confirmed that climate change is affecting their traditional food system. Local and regional efforts are needed to plan for food security and health promotion in the region, and global actions are needed to slow down the process of climate change.
PubMed ID
20568912 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.