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[Adaptive features of the ecology and annual cycle of the willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus L.) at the northern boundary of the Siberian part of the range].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261514
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2014 Nov-Dec;(6):605-15
Publication Type
Article
Author
V N Ryzhanovskii
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2014 Nov-Dec;(6):605-15
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animal Migration
Animals
Climate change
Cold Climate
Feathers - anatomy & histology - physiology
Female
Flight, Animal - physiology
Male
Molting - physiology
Passeriformes - growth & development - physiology
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Siberia
Abstract
The ecology of the willow warbler in the north of Western Siberia is considered, and the adaptations that enable the spread of this species to the Subarctic are analyzed. It is established that one of the key factors that caused the change in the range of this species is the northward distribution of shrubs and, hence, the biomass of insects (available food items of these birds).
PubMed ID
25739309 View in PubMed
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Alaskan wild berry resources and human health under the cloud of climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146583
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2010
Author
Joshua Kellogg
Jinzhi Wang
Courtney Flint
David Ribnicky
Peter Kuhn
Elvira González De Mejia
Ilya Raskin
Mary Ann Lila
Author Affiliation
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA.
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-900
Date
Apr-14-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Anthocyanins - analysis - pharmacology
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Cell Line
Climate change
Fruit - chemistry
Health
Humans
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Obesity - drug therapy
Plant Extracts - analysis - metabolism - pharmacology
Random Allocation
Rosaceae - chemistry
Abstract
Wild berries are integral dietary components for Alaska Native people and a rich source of polyphenolic metabolites that can ameliorate metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. In this study, five species of wild Alaskan berries (Vaccinium ovalifolium , Vaccinium uliginosum , Rubus chamaemorus , Rubus spectabilis , and Empetrum nigrum) were screened for bioactivity through a community-participatory research method involving three geographically distinct tribal communities. Compositional analysis by HPLC and LC-MS(2) revealed substantial site-specific variation in anthocyanins (0.01-4.39 mg/g of FW) and proanthocyanidins (0.74-6.25 mg/g of FW) and identified A-type proanthocyanidin polymers. R. spectabilis increased expression levels of preadipocyte factor 1 (182%), and proanthocyanidin-enriched fractions from other species reduced lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Selected extracts reduced serum glucose levels in C57BL/6J mice by up to 45%. Local observations provided robust insights into effects of climatic fluctuations on berry abundance and quality, and preliminary site-specific compositional and bioactivity differences were noted, suggesting the need to monitor this Alaska Native resource as climate shifts affect the region.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20025229 View in PubMed
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Awareness of climate change and the dietary choices of young adults in Finland: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263458
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e97480
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Essi A E Korkala
Timo T Hugg
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e97480
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Climate Change - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys - methods
Female
Finland
Food Preferences - psychology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Climate change is a major public health threat that is exacerbated by food production. Food items differ substantially in the amount of greenhouse gases their production generates and therefore individuals, if willing, can mitigate climate change through dietary choices. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study to assess if the understanding of climate change, concern over climate change or socio-economic characteristics are reflected in the frequencies of climate-friendly food choices. The study population comprised 1623 young adults in Finland who returned a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 64.0%). We constructed a Climate-Friendly Diet Score (CFDS) ranging theoretically from -14 to 14 based on the consumption of 14 food items. A higher CFDS indicated a climate-friendlier diet. Multivariate linear regression analyses on the determinants of CFDS revealed that medium concern raised CFDS on average by 0.51 points (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03, 0.98) and high concern by 1.30 points (95% CI 0.80, 1.80) compared to low concern. Understanding had no effect on CFDS on its own. Female gender raised CFDS by 1.92 (95% CI 1.59, 2.25). Unemployment decreased CFDS by 0.92 (95% CI -1.68, -0.15). Separate analyses of genders revealed that high concern over climate change brought about a greater increase in CFDS in females than in males. Good understanding of climate change was weakly connected to climate-friendly diet among females only. Our results indicate that increasing awareness of climate change could lead to increased consumption of climate-friendly food, reduction in GHG emissions, and thus climate change mitigation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24824363 View in PubMed
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Climate change and consequences in the Arctic: perception of climate change by the Nenets people of Vaigach Island.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129581
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:69-73.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Climate change and consequences in the Arctic: perception of climate change by the Nenets people of Vaigach Island Alexander N. Davydov* and Galina V. Mikhailova Institute of Ecological Problems of the North, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Arkhangelsk, Russia Background: Arctic
  1 document  
Author
Alexander N Davydov
Galina V Mikhailova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Ecological Problems of the North, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Arkhangelsk, Russia. davydov@arh.ru
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:69-73.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
File Size
335227
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Husbandry
Animal Migration
Animals
Arctic Regions
Child
Child, Preschool
Climate change
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Perception
Population Groups - psychology
Public Health
Public Opinion
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reindeer
Seasons
Young Adult
Abstract
Arctic climate change is already having a significant impact on the environment, economic activity, and public health. For the northern peoples, traditions and cultural identity are closely related to the natural environment so any change will have consequences for society in several ways.
A questionnaire was given to the population on the Vaigach island, the Nenets who rely to a large degree on hunting, fishing and reindeer herding for survival. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted about perception of climate change.
Climate change is observed and has already had an impact on daily life according to more than 50% of the respondents. The winter season is now colder and longer and the summer season colder and shorter. A decrease in standard of living was noticeable but few were planning to leave.
Climate change has been noticed in the region and it has a negative impact on the standard of living for the Nenets. However, as of yet they do not want to leave as cultural identity is important for their overall well-being.
PubMed ID
22091216 View in PubMed
Documents

Davydov-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Climate change and environmental impacts on maternal and newborn health with focus on Arctic populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129632
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:48-58.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Climate change and environmental impacts on maternal and newborn health with focus on Arctic populations Charlotta Rylander1, Jon Ø. Odland1* and Torkjel M. Sandanger1,2 1Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; 2Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Department of
  1 document  
Author
Charlotta Rylander
Jon Ø Odland
Torkjel M Sandanger
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:48-58.
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
813640
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Female
Food Contamination
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Greenhouse Effect
Housing
Humans
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Welfare
Pregnancy
Abstract
In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) presented a report on global warming and the impact of human activities on global warming. Later the Lancet commission identified six ways human health could be affected. Among these were not environmental factors which are also believed to be important for human health. In this paper we therefore focus on environmental factors, climate change and the predicted effects on maternal and newborn health. Arctic issues are discussed specifically considering their exposure and sensitivity to long range transported contaminants.
Considering that the different parts of pregnancy are particularly sensitive time periods for the effects of environmental exposure, this review focuses on the impacts on maternal and newborn health. Environmental stressors known to affects human health and how these will change with the predicted climate change are addressed. Air pollution and food security are crucial issues for the pregnant population in a changing climate, especially indoor climate and food security in Arctic areas.
The total number of environmental factors is today responsible for a large number of the global deaths, especially in young children. Climate change will most likely lead to an increase in this number. Exposure to the different environmental stressors especially air pollution will in most parts of the world increase with climate change, even though some areas might face lower exposure. Populations at risk today are believed to be most heavily affected. As for the persistent organic pollutants a warming climate leads to a remobilisation and a possible increase in food chain exposure in the Arctic and thus increased risk for Arctic populations. This is especially the case for mercury. The perspective for the next generations will be closely connected to the expected temperature changes; changes in housing conditions; changes in exposure patterns; predicted increased exposure to Mercury because of increased emissions and increased biological availability.
A number of environmental stressors are predicted to increase with climate change and increasingly affecting human health. Efforts should be put on reducing risk for the next generation, thus global politics and research effort should focus on maternal and newborn health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22084626 View in PubMed
Documents

Rylander-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Climate change effects on human health in a gender perspective: some trends in Arctic research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130978
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:59-64.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Climate change effects on human health in a gender perspective: some trends in Arctic research Kukarenko Natalia* Department of Social Sciences, Northern Research Institute (NORUT), Tromsø, Norway Background: Climate change and environmental pollution have become pressing concerns for the
  1 document  
Author
Kukarenko Natalia
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Sciences, Northern Research Institute (NORUT), Tromsø, Norway. natalia.kukarenko@norut.no
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:59-64.
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
210741
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biomedical Research - trends
Climate change
Cold Climate
Female
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
World Health
Abstract
Climate change and environmental pollution have become pressing concerns for the peoples in the Arctic region. Some researchers link climate change, transformations of living conditions and human health. A number of studies have also provided data on differentiating effects of climate change on women's and men's well-being and health.
To show how the issues of climate and environment change, human health and gender are addressed in current research in the Arctic. The main purpose of this article is not to give a full review but to draw attention to the gaps in knowledge and challenges in the Arctic research trends on climate change, human health and gender.
A broad literature search was undertaken using a variety of sources from natural, medical, social science and humanities. The focus was on the keywords.
Despite the evidence provided by many researchers on differentiating effects of climate change on well-being and health of women and men, gender perspective remains of marginal interest in climate change, environmental and health studies. At the same time, social sciences and humanities, and gender studies in particular, show little interest towards climate change impacts on human health in the Arctic. As a result, we still observe the division of labour between disciplines, the disciplinary-bound pictures of human development in the Arctic and terminology confusion.
Efforts to bring in a gender perspective in the Arctic research will be successful only when different disciplines would work together. Multidisciplinary research is a way to challenge academic/disciplinary homogeneity and their boundaries, to take advantage of the diversity of approaches and methods in production of new integrated knowledge. Cooperation and dialogue across disciplines will help to develop adequate indicators for monitoring human health and elaborating efficient policies and strategies to the benefit of both women and men in the Arctic.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21949499 View in PubMed
Documents

Natalia-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Climate Degradation and Extreme Icing Events Constrain Life in Cold-Adapted Mammals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296102
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 01 18; 8(1):1156
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
01-18-2018
Author
J Berger
C Hartway
A Gruzdev
M Johnson
Author Affiliation
Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 80523, USA. jberger@wcs.org.
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 01 18; 8(1):1156
Date
01-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Body Size
Climate Change - mortality
Cold Climate
Disasters - history
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 21st Century
Male
Otters - physiology
Rain
Ruminants - physiology
Snow
Tsunamis - history
Whales - physiology
Abstract
Despite the growth in knowledge about the effects of a warming Arctic on its cold-adapted species, the mechanisms by which these changes affect animal populations remain poorly understood. Increasing temperatures, declining sea ice and altered wind and precipitation patterns all may affect the fitness and abundance of species through multiple direct and indirect pathways. Here we demonstrate previously unknown effects of rain-on-snow (ROS) events, winter precipitation, and ice tidal surges on the Arctic's largest land mammal. Using novel field data across seven years and three Alaskan and Russian sites, we show arrested skeletal growth in juvenile muskoxen resulting from unusually dry winter conditions and gestational ROS events, with the inhibitory effects on growth from ROS events lasting up to three years post-partum. Further, we describe the simultaneous entombment of 52 muskoxen in ice during a Chukchi Sea winter tsunami (ivuniq in Iñupiat), and link rapid freezing to entrapment of Arctic whales and otters. Our results illustrate how once unusual, but increasingly frequent Arctic weather events affect some cold-adapted mammals, and suggest that an understanding of species responses to a changing Arctic can be enhanced by coalescing groundwork, rare events, and insights from local people.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29348632 View in PubMed
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Cold summer weather, constrained restoration, and very low birth weight in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114576
Source
Health Place. 2013 Jul;22:68-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Terry Hartig
Ralph Catalano
Author Affiliation
Institute for Housing and Urban Research, Uppsala University, Box 514, SE-75330 Uppsala, Sweden. terry.hartig@ibf.uu.se
Source
Health Place. 2013 Jul;22:68-74
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Climate change
Cold Temperature
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Models, Statistical
Motor Activity
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Seasons
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Abstract
In higher latitudes, relatively cold summer weather may constrain outdoor activities that provide relief from chronic stress. Chronic stress can affect human birth outcomes, including the length of gestation and so the birth weight of the infant. We tested the hypothesis that, in Sweden, the odds of very low birth weight (VLBW;
PubMed ID
23603428 View in PubMed
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Community-based research as a mechanism to reduce environmental health disparities in american Indian and alaska native communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272066
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Apr;12(4):4076-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Cynthia Agumanu McOliver
Anne K Camper
John T Doyle
Margaret J Eggers
Tim E Ford
Mary Ann Lila
James Berner
Larry Campbell
Jamie Donatuto
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Apr;12(4):4076-100
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Community-Based Participatory Research
Environmental health
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Minority Groups
Quality of Life
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Abstract
Racial and ethnic minority communities, including American Indian and Alaska Natives, have been disproportionately impacted by environmental pollution and contamination. This includes siting and location of point sources of pollution, legacies of contamination of drinking and recreational water, and mining, military and agricultural impacts. As a result, both quantity and quality of culturally important subsistence resources are diminished, contributing to poor nutrition and obesity, and overall reductions in quality of life and life expectancy. Climate change is adding to these impacts on Native American communities, variably causing drought, increased flooding and forced relocation affecting tribal water resources, traditional foods, forests and forest resources, and tribal health. This article will highlight several extramural research projects supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science to Achieve Results (STAR) tribal environmental research grants as a mechanism to address the environmental health inequities and disparities faced by tribal communities. The tribal research portfolio has focused on addressing tribal environmental health risks through community based participatory research. Specifically, the STAR research program was developed under the premise that tribal populations may be at an increased risk for environmentally-induced diseases as a result of unique subsistence and traditional practices of the tribes and Alaska Native villages, community activities, occupations and customs, and/or environmental releases that significantly and disproportionately impact tribal lands. Through a series of case studies, this article will demonstrate how grantees-tribal community leaders and members and academic collaborators-have been addressing these complex environmental concerns by developing capacity, expertise and tools through community-engaged research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25872019 View in PubMed
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