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28 records – page 1 of 3.

Source
Inuit Circumpolar Conference (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 54 p.
Publication Type
Report
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Conference (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 54 p.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Alaska
Chukotka
Climate change
Arctic Council
Biodiversity
Human Rights
Environment
Sustainable development
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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 34 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
on Indigenous Peoples ..................................................................................... 9 Environment and Sustainable Development ......................................................................................... 10 Climate Change
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 34 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3283810
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Wildlife
Biodiversity
Sustainable development
Environment
Health
Mercury
Languages
Documents

merged_document__2_.pdf

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Accumulated state of the Yukon River watershed: part I critical review of literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121234
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Monique G Dubé
Breda Muldoon
Julie Wilson
Karonhiakta'tie Bryan Maracle
Author Affiliation
Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Alberta, Canada. Dub.mon@hotmail.com
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animal Migration
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Climate change
Environment
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Fishes - physiology
Fresh Water - analysis - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Seasons
Water Movements
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Water Quality
Yukon Territory - epidemiology
Abstract
A consistent methodology for assessing the accumulating effects of natural and manmade change on riverine systems has not been developed for a whole host of reasons including a lack of data, disagreement over core elements to consider, and complexity. Accumulated state assessments of aquatic systems is an integral component of watershed cumulative effects assessment. The Yukon River is the largest free flowing river in the world and is the fourth largest drainage basin in North America, draining 855,000 km(2) in Canada and the United States. Because of its remote location, it is considered pristine but little is known about its cumulative state. This review identified 7 "hot spot" areas in the Yukon River Basin including Lake Laberge, Yukon River at Dawson City, the Charley and Yukon River confluence, Porcupine and Yukon River confluence, Yukon River at the Dalton Highway Bridge, Tolovana River near Tolovana, and Tanana River at Fairbanks. Climate change, natural stressors, and anthropogenic stresses have resulted in accumulating changes including measurable levels of contaminants in surface waters and fish tissues, fish and human disease, changes in surface hydrology, as well as shifts in biogeochemical loads. This article is the first integrated accumulated state assessment for the Yukon River basin based on a literature review. It is the first part of a 2-part series. The second article (Dubé et al. 2013a, this issue) is a quantitative accumulated state assessment of the Yukon River Basin where hot spots and hot moments are assessed outside of a "normal" range of variability.
PubMed ID
22927161 View in PubMed
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Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti in the continental United States: a vector at the cool margin of its geographic range.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112750
Source
J Med Entomol. 2013 May;50(3):467-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Lars Eisen
Chester G Moore
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, 3195 Rampart Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. lars.eisen@colostate.edu
Source
J Med Entomol. 2013 May;50(3):467-78
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aedes - growth & development - physiology - virology
Animals
Climate change
Dengue - epidemiology - history - transmission - virology
Dengue Virus - physiology
Disease Outbreaks - history
Environment
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Insect Vectors - growth & development - physiology - virology
Larva - growth & development - physiology
Temperature
United States - epidemiology
Yellow Fever - epidemiology - history - transmission - virology
Yellow fever virus - physiology
Abstract
After more than a half century without recognized local dengue outbreaks in the continental United States, there were recent outbreaks of autochthonous dengue in the southern parts of Texas (2004-2005) and Florida (2009-2011). This dengue reemergence has provoked interest in the extent of the future threat posed by the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L.), the primary vector of dengue and yellow fever viruses in urban settings, to human health in the continental United States. Ae. aegypti is an intriguing example of a vector species that not only occurs in the southernmost portions of the eastern United States today but also is incriminated as the likely primary vector in historical outbreaks of yellow fever as far north as New York, Philadelphia, and Boston, from the 1690s to the 1820s. For vector species with geographic ranges limited, in part, by low temperature and cool range margins occurring in the southern part of the continental United States, as is currently the case for Ae. aegypti, it is tempting to speculate that climate warming may result in a northward range expansion (similar to that seen for Ixodes tick vectors of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes in Scandinavia and southern Canada in recent decades). Although there is no doubt that climate conditions directly impact many aspects of the life history of Ae. aegypti, this mosquito also is closely linked to the human environment and directly influenced by the availability of water-holding containers for oviposition and larval development. Competition with other container-inhabiting mosquito species, particularly Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse), also may impact the presence and local abundance of Ae. aegypti. Field-based studies that focus solely on the impact of weather or climate factors on the presence and abundance of Ae. aegypti, including assessments of the potential impact of climate warming on the mosquito's future range and abundance, do not consider the potential confounding effects of socioeconomic factors or biological competitors for establishment and proliferation of Ae. aegypti. The results of such studies therefore should not be assumed to apply in areas with different socioeconomic conditions or composition of container-inhabiting mosquito species. For example, results from field-based studies at the high altitude cool margins for Ae. aegypti in Mexico's central highlands or the Andes in South America cannot be assumed to be directly applicable to geographic areas in the United States with comparable climate conditions. Unfortunately, we have a very poor understanding of how climatic drivers interact with the human landscape and biological competitors to impact establishment and proliferation of Ae. aegypti at the cool margin of its range in the continental United States. A first step toward assessing the future threat this mosquito poses to human health in the continental United States is to design and conduct studies across strategic climatic and socioeconomic gradients in the United States (including the U.S.-Mexico border area) to determine the permissiveness of the coupled natural and human environment for Ae. aegypti at the present time. This approach will require experimental studies and field surveys that focus specifically on climate conditions relevant to the continental United States. These studies also must include assessments of how the human landscape, particularly the impact of availability of larval developmental sites and the permissiveness of homes for mosquito intrusion, and the presence of other container-inhabiting mosquitoes that may compete with Ae. aegypti for larval habitat affects the ability of Ae. aegypti to establish and proliferate. Until we are armed with such knowledge, it is not possible to meaningfully assess the potential for climate warming to impact the proliferation potential for Ae. aegypti in the United States outside of the geographic areas where the mosquito already is firmly established, and even less so for dengue virus transmission and dengue disease in humans.
PubMed ID
23802440 View in PubMed
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Annual Report 2011-2012 : Inuit Circumpolar Council - Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297082
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON.
Publication Type
Report
Page 8: Aqpiks by Duane Smith Page 8: Permafrost by Duane Smith Page 9: H.E. Ms. Nozipho Joyce Mxakato-Diseko, South African Ambassador for Climate Change by Leanna Ellsworth Page 12: UNEP by Eva Kr├╝mmel Page 13: Whitefish by Duane Smith Page 24: Iqaluit by Jocelyne Durocher Front Cover
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
7102990
Keywords
Inuit
Alaska
Chukotka
Climate change
Biodiversity
Wildlife
Environment
Sustainable development
Contaminants
Documents

annualreport_20112012_eng.pdf

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Annual Report 2015-2016 : Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297096
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 20 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2016
........................ 7 UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE - COP21 (UNFCCC) .................... 7 CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY (CBD) ......................................................................................... 8 UNITED NATIONS PERMANENT FORUM ON INDIGENOUS ISSUES (UNPFII
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 20 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4148616
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Biodiversity
Indigenous peoples
Health
Environment
Documents

english_final_2015-2016_annual_report_withcover_fordigital.pdf

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Assessing the impacts of local knowledge and technology on climate change vulnerability in remote communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134649
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Mar;8(3):733-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Christopher Bone
Lilian Alessa
Mark Altaweel
Andrew Kliskey
Richard Lammers
Author Affiliation
Resilience and Adaptive Management Group, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3101 Science Circle, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. Christopher.Bone@nrcan.gc.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Mar;8(3):733-61
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Climate
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Environment
Humans
Knowledge
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Rural Population
Technology
Water supply
Young Adult
Abstract
The introduction of new technologies into small remote communities can alter how individuals acquire knowledge about their surrounding environment. This is especially true when technologies that satisfy basic needs, such as freshwater use, create a distance (i.e., diminishing exposure) between individuals and their environment. However, such distancing can potentially be countered by the transfer of local knowledge between community members and from one generation to the next. The objective of this study is to simulate by way of agent-based modeling the tensions between technology-induced distancing and local knowledge that are exerted on community vulnerability to climate change. A model is developed that simulates how a collection of individual perceptions about changes to climatic-related variables manifest into community perceptions, how perceptions are influenced by the movement away from traditional resource use, and how the transmission of knowledge mitigates the potentially adverse effects of technology-induced distancing. The model is implemented utilizing climate and social data for two remote communities located on the Seward Peninsula in western Alaska. The agent-based model simulates a set of scenarios that depict different ways in which these communities may potentially engage with their natural resources, utilize knowledge transfer, and develop perceptions of how the local climate is different from previous years. A loosely-coupled pan-arctic climate model simulates changes monthly changes to climatic variables. The discrepancy between the perceptions derived from the agent-based model and the projections simulated by the climate model represent community vulnerability. The results demonstrate how demographics, the communication of knowledge and the types of 'knowledge-providers' influence community perception about changes to their local climate.
Notes
Cites: J Environ Manage. 2010 Aug;91(8):1718-2920417023
PubMed ID
21556176 View in PubMed
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Source
Ann Rev Mar Sci. 2009;1:303-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Keith C Hester
Peter G Brewer
Author Affiliation
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA 95039, USA. khester@mbari.org
Source
Ann Rev Mar Sci. 2009;1:303-27
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate change
Environment
Gases - analysis - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Oceans and Seas
Thermodynamics
Abstract
Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.
PubMed ID
21141039 View in PubMed
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Climate change: the next challenge for public mental health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262713
Source
Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):415-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
François Bourque
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Source
Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):415-22
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Climate change
Disasters
Droughts
Environment
Floods
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Mental health
Public Health
Weather
Abstract
Climate change is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to human health of the 21st century, with consequences that mental health professionals are also likely to face. While physical health impacts have been increasingly emphasized in literature and practice, recent scholarly literature indicates that climate change and related weather events and environmental changes can profoundly impact psychological well-being and mental health through both direct and indirect pathways, particularly among those with pre-existing vulnerabilities or those living in ecologically sensitive areas. Although knowledge is still limited about the connections between climate change and mental health, evidence is indicating that impacts may be felt at both the individual and community levels, with mental health outcomes ranging from psychological distress, depression and anxiety, to increased addictions and suicide rates. Drawing on examples from diverse geographical areas, this article highlights some climate-sensitive impacts that may be encountered by mental health professionals. We then suggest potential avenues for public mental health in light of current and projected changes, in order to stimulate thought, debate, and action.
PubMed ID
25137107 View in PubMed
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Climate impacts on human settlement and agricultural activities in northern Norway revealed through sediment biogeochemistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118641
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Dec 11;109(50):20332-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-2012
Author
Robert M D'Anjou
Raymond S Bradley
Nicholas L Balascio
David B Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Climate System Research Center, Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA. rdanjou@geo.umass.edu
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Dec 11;109(50):20332-7
Date
Dec-11-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - history
Animals
Archaeology
Climate Change - history
Environment
Feces - chemistry
Geologic Sediments - analysis
History, Ancient
Humans
Norway
Sterols - analysis
Abstract
Disentangling the effects of climate change and anthropogenic activities on the environment is a major challenge in paleoenvironmental research. Here, we used fecal sterols and other biogeochemical compounds in lake sediments from northern Norway to identify both natural and anthropogenic signals of environmental change during the late Holocene. The area was first occupied by humans and their grazing animals at ~2,250 ± 75 calendar years before 1950 AD (calendar years before present). The arrival of humans is indicated by an abrupt increase in coprostanol (and its epimer epicoprostanol) in the sediments and an associated increase in 5ß-stigmastanol (and 5ß-epistigmastanol), which resulted from human and animal feces washing into the lake. Human settlement was accompanied by an abrupt increase in landscape fires (indicated by the rise in pyrolytic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and a decline in woodland (registered by a change in n-alkane chain lengths from leaf waxes), accelerating a process that began earlier in the Holocene. Human activity and associated landscape changes in the region over the last two millennia were mainly driven by summer temperatures, as indicated by independent tree-ring reconstructions, although there were periods when socioeconomic factors played an equally important role. In this study, fecal sterols in lake sediments have been used to provide a record of human occupancy through time. This approach may be useful in many archeological studies, both to confirm the presence of humans and grazing animals, and to distinguish between anthropogenic and natural factors that have influenced the environment in the past.
Notes
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2012 Jan 1;414:6-2122137478
Cites: Environ Int. 2002 Mar;27(8):647-5411934114
PubMed ID
23185025 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.