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Adapting to the effects of climate change on Inuit health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104452
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
James D Ford
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Susan Chatwood
Christopher Furgal
Sherilee Harper
Ian Mauro
Tristan Pearce
Author Affiliation
James D. Ford is with the Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. Ashlee Cunsolo Willox is with the Department of Community Health, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia. Susan Chatwood is with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Christopher Furgal is with the Department of Indigenous Environmental Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario. Sherilee Harper is with the Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Ontario. Ian Mauro is with the Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Tristan Pearce is with the University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydor, Queensland, Australia.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate change
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Climate change will have far-reaching implications for Inuit health. Focusing on adaptation offers a proactive approach for managing climate-related health risks-one that views Inuit populations as active agents in planning and responding at household, community, and regional levels. Adaptation can direct attention to the root causes of climate vulnerability and emphasize the importance of traditional knowledge regarding environmental change and adaptive strategies. An evidence base on adaptation options and processes for Inuit regions is currently lacking, however, thus constraining climate policy development. In this article, we tackled this deficit, drawing upon our understanding of the determinants of health vulnerability to climate change in Canada to propose key considerations for adaptation decision-making in an Inuit context.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24754615 View in PubMed
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Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288411
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
Canada
Research
Arctic Regions
Climate Change
Mental Health
Acclimatization
Food
Healthy Lifestyle
Abstract
The Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research (AICBR) is a unique Northern organization that works to bring together multiple groups and sectors on issues that are identified by and relevant to their partners. Current priorities include food security and food sovereignty, healthy lifestyles, youth engagement and mental health, and climate change adaptation.
Online Resources
Less detail
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
ArcticNet
Language
French
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
Canada
Humans
Climate Change
Private Sector
Inuits
Arctic Regions
Abstract
ArcticNet at the University of Laval is part of the Network of Centres of Excellence bringing together scientists and managers in the natural, human health and social sciences with their partners in Inuit organizations, northern communities, federal and provincial agencies and the private sector to study the impacts of climate change in the coastal Canadian Arctic.
Online Resources
Less detail
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
ArcticNorth
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Vulnerability & Adaptation
Climate change
Acclimatization
Adaptation
Physiological
Climate
Canada
Abstract
ArcticNorth Consulting was established by James Ford, PhD, and Tristan Pearce, PhD, to assist communities, businesses, and industry adapt to a changing climate. Dr. Ford and Dr. Pearce are award-winning scientists with extensive experience working with communities, governments, NGOs, and First Nations groups across Canada and internationally on climate change vulnerability assessment and adaptation planning.
Online Resources
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Source
Curr Biol. 2010 Aug 10;20(15):R617-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2010
Author
Nigel Williams
Source
Curr Biol. 2010 Aug 10;20(15):R617-8
Date
Aug-10-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body Composition
Canada
Climate change
Ursidae - physiology
Abstract
The threat to the Hudson Bay polar bears highlights the reality of a changing climate under attack from sceptics.
PubMed ID
20705539 View in PubMed
Less detail
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Government of Canada
Language
English
French
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
Canada
Climate Change
Government
Policy
Abstract
This is a Government of Canada website that reviews policies, programs, scientific research, and interdepartmental work being done to fight climate change in Canada.
Online Resources
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Canadian federal support for climate change and health research compared with the risks posed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135310
Source
Am J Public Health. 2011 May;101(5):814-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
James D Ford
Tanya R Smith
Lea Berrang-Ford
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. james.ford@mcgill.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2011 May;101(5):814-21
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Climate Change - economics
Financing, Government - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Priorities
Health Services Research - economics
Humans
Inuits
Politics
Risk factors
Abstract
For emerging public health risks such as climate change, the Canadian federal government has a mandate to provide information and resources to protect citizens' health. Research is a key component of this mandate and is essential if Canada is to moderate the health effects of a changing climate. We assessed whether federal support for climate change and health research is consistent with the risks posed. We audited projects receiving federal support between 1999 and 2009, representing an investment of Can$16 million in 105 projects. Although funding has increased in recent years, it remains inadequate, with negligible focus on vulnerable populations, limited research on adaptation, and volatility in funding allocations. A federal strategy to guide research support is overdue.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21490335 View in PubMed
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Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources (CIER)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288443
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources (CIER)
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Witnesses to Change
Climate change
Floods
Canada
Abstract
CIER was founded in 1994 by a small group of First Nation leaders from across Canada who recognized the need for Aboriginal peoples to have the capacity to solve environmental problems affecting their lands and resources.
Online Resources
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Civil society organizations and adaptation to the health effects of climate change in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114764
Source
Public Health. 2013 May;127(5):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
C. Poutiainen
L. Berrang-Ford
J. Ford
J. Heymann
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, 805 Sherbrooke Street West #321, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6, Canada. carolyn.poutiainen@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Public Health. 2013 May;127(5):403-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Canada
Climate change
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Organizations - organization & administration
Public Health Practice
Abstract
Adaptation will be necessary to cope with the impacts of climate change on the health of Canadians. Civil society organizations (CSOs) have an important role in health adaptation, but it is unknown what actions they are undertaking.
To identify and examine what adaptations are being developed by CSOs to adapt to the health effects of climate change based on a systematic review of the activities of 190 organizations and 1196 reported adaptation actions.
There were six key findings: (1) health adaptation actions are predominantly led by environmental CSOs; (2) most actions are occurring at national and regional levels; (3) food and/or water contamination and air quality are dominant climate change stimuli for action; (4) responses predominantly reflect awareness and research activities, with limited evidence of substantive intervention; (5) consideration of vulnerable groups is limited; and (6) climate change is usually considered alongside other factors, if at all.
The results indicate a deficit in terms of what needs to be done for health adaptation and what is being done; part of a broader adaptation deficit in Canada. Coordinated adaptation planning at federal and provincial level is needed, involving collaboration between CSOs and public health bodies.
Notes
Comment In: Public Health. 2013 May;127(5):401-223648047
PubMed ID
23583032 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.