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The Arctic as a messenger for global processes -- climate change and pollution

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275995
Source
Abstract book from a conference held May 3-6, 2011, in Copenhagen, Denmark, by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), Aarhus University, and University of Copenhagen
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2011
  1 website  
Source
Abstract book from a conference held May 3-6, 2011, in Copenhagen, Denmark, by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), Aarhus University, and University of Copenhagen
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
AMAP
Arctic
Carbon
Climate change
Contaminants
Human health
Mercury
Ocean acidification
POPs
Projections
SWIPA
Abstract
Established by the eight Arctic Countries in 1991, and now one of the groups serving the Arctic Council, AMAP is charged with coordinating monitoring and performing scientific assessments of pollution and climate change issues in the circum-Arctic area to document trends and effects in Arctic ecosystems and humans and identify possible actions for consideration by policy makers.
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Arctic Summer College. Arctic Circle Conference Discussion Session. Fellow Paper.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
age and demands in the High North are only increasing. For example, governments and industry are seeking to expand services and operations northward as climate change opens up the once ice-locked region. In turn, locals aspire to interact with and take advantage of the opportunities of the
  1 document  
Author
Kuersten, Andreas
Source
Arctic Summer College. Arctic Circle Conference Discussion Session. Fellow Paper.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
208623
Keywords
Telecommunications
Arctic
Climate change
Infrastructure
Development
Abstract
For many, the Arctic’s harsh environment, remoteness, and sparse population are what make it so unique and beautiful. But these same qualities also make establishing reliable and fast telecommunications infrastructure in the region extremely difficult – particularly with regard to the North American Arctic. Indeed, these conditions make the installation of any telecommunications system, much less one with modern dependability and speed, an arduous undertaking. Yet connectivity is a necessity in the modern age and demands in the High North are only increasing. For example, governments and industry are seeking to expand services and operations northward as climate change opens up the once ice-locked region. In turn, locals aspire to interact with and take advantage of the opportunities of the wider world. Regardless of whether one appreciates or opposes the pace and forces behind northern development, Arctic telecommunications infrastructure – whether supplying basic services or facilitating personal and economic ambitions – is inadequate for both current and future demand.
Documents

Kuersten_ASC-Paper_0.pdf

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Science. 2001 Jan;291(5503):424-425
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
  1 website  
Author
Krajick, K
Source
Science. 2001 Jan;291(5503):424-425
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic
Climate change
Abstract
Field observations from the Beaufort Sea to Hudson Bay suggest that many species are floundering in a warming environment
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Brackish meltponds on Arctic sea ice--a new habitat for marine metazoans

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276012
Source
Polar Biology. 2011 Apr;34(4):603-608
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Kramer, M
Kiko, R
Source
Polar Biology. 2011 Apr;34(4):603-608
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic
Climate change
Marine metazoans
Meltponds
Sea ice
Sympagic meiofauna
Under-ice amphipods
Abstract
Meltponds on Arctic sea ice have previously been reported to be devoid of marine metazoans due to fresh-water conditions. The predominantly dark frequently also green and brownish meltponds observed in the central Arctic in summer 2007 hinted to brackish conditions and considerable amounts of algae, possibly making the habitat suitable for marine metazoans. Environmental conditions in meltponds as well as sympagic meiofauna in new ice covering pond surfaces and in rotten ice on the bottom of ponds were studied, applying modified techniques from sea-ice and under-ice research. Due to the very porous structure of the rotten ice, the meltponds were usually brackish to saline, providing living conditions very similar to sub-ice water. The new ice cover on the surface had similar characteristics as the bottom layer of level ice. The ponds were thus accessible to and inhabitable by metazoans. The new ice cover and the rotten ice were inhabited by various sympagic meiofauna taxa, predominantly ciliates, rotifers, acoels, nematodes and foraminiferans. Also, sympagic amphipods were found on the bottom of meltponds. We suggest that, in consequence of global warming, brackish and saline meltponds are becoming more frequent in the Arctic, providing a new habitat to marine metazoans.
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SGI Quarterly.
Date
Apr-2009
  1 website  
Author
Hassol, SJ
Corell, RW
Source
SGI Quarterly.
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Keywords
Arctic
Climate change
Abstract
Climate change is taking place at the same time as many other changes in the Arctic, including an increase in chemical contaminants entering the Arctic from other regions, overfishing, land-use changes that result in habitat destruction and fragmentation, as well as cultural, governance and economic changes. Impacts on the environment and society result from the interplay of all of these changes.
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Arctic. 2008 Mar;61(Suppl 1):7-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
  1 website  
Author
Barber, DG
Lukovich, JV
Keogak, J
Baryluk, S
Fortier, L
Henry, GHR
Source
Arctic. 2008 Mar;61(Suppl 1):7-26
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic
Atmosphere
Climate change
Ecosystems
Marine science
Sea ice
Abstract
The first and strongest signs of global-scale climate change exist in the high latitudes of the planet. Evidence is now accumulating that the Arctic is warming, and responses are being observed across physical, biological, and social systems. The impact of climate change on oceanographic, sea-ice, and atmospheric processes is demonstrated in observational studies that highlight changes in temperature and salinity, which influence global oceanic circulation, also known as thermohaline circulation, as well as a continued decline in sea-ice extent and thickness, which influences communication between oceanic and atmospheric processes. Perspectives from Inuvialuit community representatives who have witnessed the effects of climate change underline the rapidity with which such changes have occurred in the North. An analysis of potential future impacts of climate change on marine and terrestrial ecosystems underscores the need for the establishment of effective adaptation strategies in the Arctic. Initiatives that link scientific knowledge and research with traditional knowledge are recommended to aid Canada's northern communities in developing such strategies.
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Climate change and human health: Infrastructure impacts to small remote communities in the north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49155
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):487-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
  1 website  
Author
Warren, JA
Berner, JE
Curtis, T
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Division of Environmental Health and Engineering, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jwarren@anthc.org
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):487-97
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic
Climate change
Engineering
Human health
Infrastructure
Abstract
In northern regions, climate change can include changes in precipitation magnitude and frequency, reductions in sea ice extent and thickness, and climate warming and cooling. These changes can increase the frequency and severity of storms, flooding, or erosion; other changes may include drought or degradation of permafrost. Climate change can result in damage to sanitation infrastructure resulting in the spread of disease or threatening a community's ability to maintain its economy, geographic location and cultural tradition, leading to mental stress. Through monitoring of some basic indicators communities can begin to develop a response to climate change. With this information, planners, engineers, health care professionals and governments can begin to develop approaches to address the challenges related to climate change.
PubMed ID
16440611 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Climate change impact on human exposure to persistent contaminants in Arctic Russia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256408
Source
Pages 327-328 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ON HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT CONTAMINANTS IN ARCTIC RUSSIA V. Chashchin Northwest Public Health Research Center 2/3 of Russia's territory is represented by permafrost lands populated by 11 million residents. About o.5o/o of those are formally entitled to indigenous
  1 document  
Author
Chashchin
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Center
Source
Pages 327-328 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Russia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Climate change
Russian Federation
Arctic
Persistent contaminants
Disease
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Climate change in the Arctic: how global institutional investors may help save the unique and relatively pristine region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297134
Source
Nordea. 65 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
April 2017
1 Climate Change in the Arctic How global institutional investors may help save the unique and relatively pristine region April 2017 2 Index Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Overview of the Arctic
  1 document  
Source
Nordea. 65 p.
Date
April 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1709877
Keywords
Arctic
Climate change
Sustainability
Arctic Council
Business operations
Documents

Climate_Change_in_the_Arctic.pdf

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Earth's ice: Sea level, climate, and our future commitment

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276025
Source
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. 2011 Jan;67(1):28-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Scambos, T
Source
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. 2011 Jan;67(1):28-40
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctica
Arctic
Climate change
Cryosphere
Global warming
Greenhouse gases
Greenland
Sea ice
Sea level rise
Abstract
The world's icy and snowy regions--the cryosphere--are where the most profound changes will occur as the globe continues warming. In many areas, the levels of cryospheric change today are surpassing any seen in the past hundreds to thousands of years. This amplified response has a simple explanation: Most of the cryosphere is, on average, near the freezing point. Small shifts in temperature push large regions to a different physical state. However, while the processes leading to the loss of ice are quickly started, they do not quickly stop. We are on the verge of committing ourselves to sizable increases in sea level. The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report estimated sea level rise in this century at just 20 to 60 centimeters, but that total did not include contributions from the break-up and flow of ice sheets. The melting of mountain glaciers and ice in Greenland and Antarctica could add an additional meter of sea level rise. An equally important effect may be the feedback that changes in ice--especially the ice-covered ocean--have on climate in both the polar and the temperate regions of the world. The author describes the processes that are rapidly eroding polar ice.
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23 records – page 1 of 3.