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Accumulated state of the Yukon River watershed: part I critical review of literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121234
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Monique G Dubé
Breda Muldoon
Julie Wilson
Karonhiakta'tie Bryan Maracle
Author Affiliation
Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Alberta, Canada. Dub.mon@hotmail.com
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animal Migration
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Climate change
Environment
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Fishes - physiology
Fresh Water - analysis - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Seasons
Water Movements
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Water Quality
Yukon Territory - epidemiology
Abstract
A consistent methodology for assessing the accumulating effects of natural and manmade change on riverine systems has not been developed for a whole host of reasons including a lack of data, disagreement over core elements to consider, and complexity. Accumulated state assessments of aquatic systems is an integral component of watershed cumulative effects assessment. The Yukon River is the largest free flowing river in the world and is the fourth largest drainage basin in North America, draining 855,000 km(2) in Canada and the United States. Because of its remote location, it is considered pristine but little is known about its cumulative state. This review identified 7 "hot spot" areas in the Yukon River Basin including Lake Laberge, Yukon River at Dawson City, the Charley and Yukon River confluence, Porcupine and Yukon River confluence, Yukon River at the Dalton Highway Bridge, Tolovana River near Tolovana, and Tanana River at Fairbanks. Climate change, natural stressors, and anthropogenic stresses have resulted in accumulating changes including measurable levels of contaminants in surface waters and fish tissues, fish and human disease, changes in surface hydrology, as well as shifts in biogeochemical loads. This article is the first integrated accumulated state assessment for the Yukon River basin based on a literature review. It is the first part of a 2-part series. The second article (Dubé et al. 2013a, this issue) is a quantitative accumulated state assessment of the Yukon River Basin where hot spots and hot moments are assessed outside of a "normal" range of variability.
PubMed ID
22927161 View in PubMed
Less detail
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Sea Grant
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Vulnerability & Adaptation
Animals
Climate change
Permafrost
Introduced species
Ice
Ecosystem
Floods
Freezing
Abstract
Seventeen-minute video produced by Alaska Sea Grant and NOAA Alaska Region.
Online Resources
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[Adaptive features of the ecology and annual cycle of the willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus L.) at the northern boundary of the Siberian part of the range].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261514
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2014 Nov-Dec;(6):605-15
Publication Type
Article
Author
V N Ryzhanovskii
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2014 Nov-Dec;(6):605-15
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animal Migration
Animals
Climate change
Cold Climate
Feathers - anatomy & histology - physiology
Female
Flight, Animal - physiology
Male
Molting - physiology
Passeriformes - growth & development - physiology
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Siberia
Abstract
The ecology of the willow warbler in the north of Western Siberia is considered, and the adaptations that enable the spread of this species to the Subarctic are analyzed. It is established that one of the key factors that caused the change in the range of this species is the northward distribution of shrubs and, hence, the biomass of insects (available food items of these birds).
PubMed ID
25739309 View in PubMed
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Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti in the continental United States: a vector at the cool margin of its geographic range.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112750
Source
J Med Entomol. 2013 May;50(3):467-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Lars Eisen
Chester G Moore
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, 3195 Rampart Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. lars.eisen@colostate.edu
Source
J Med Entomol. 2013 May;50(3):467-78
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aedes - growth & development - physiology - virology
Animals
Climate change
Dengue - epidemiology - history - transmission - virology
Dengue Virus - physiology
Disease Outbreaks - history
Environment
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Insect Vectors - growth & development - physiology - virology
Larva - growth & development - physiology
Temperature
United States - epidemiology
Yellow Fever - epidemiology - history - transmission - virology
Yellow fever virus - physiology
Abstract
After more than a half century without recognized local dengue outbreaks in the continental United States, there were recent outbreaks of autochthonous dengue in the southern parts of Texas (2004-2005) and Florida (2009-2011). This dengue reemergence has provoked interest in the extent of the future threat posed by the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L.), the primary vector of dengue and yellow fever viruses in urban settings, to human health in the continental United States. Ae. aegypti is an intriguing example of a vector species that not only occurs in the southernmost portions of the eastern United States today but also is incriminated as the likely primary vector in historical outbreaks of yellow fever as far north as New York, Philadelphia, and Boston, from the 1690s to the 1820s. For vector species with geographic ranges limited, in part, by low temperature and cool range margins occurring in the southern part of the continental United States, as is currently the case for Ae. aegypti, it is tempting to speculate that climate warming may result in a northward range expansion (similar to that seen for Ixodes tick vectors of Lyme borreliosis spirochetes in Scandinavia and southern Canada in recent decades). Although there is no doubt that climate conditions directly impact many aspects of the life history of Ae. aegypti, this mosquito also is closely linked to the human environment and directly influenced by the availability of water-holding containers for oviposition and larval development. Competition with other container-inhabiting mosquito species, particularly Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse), also may impact the presence and local abundance of Ae. aegypti. Field-based studies that focus solely on the impact of weather or climate factors on the presence and abundance of Ae. aegypti, including assessments of the potential impact of climate warming on the mosquito's future range and abundance, do not consider the potential confounding effects of socioeconomic factors or biological competitors for establishment and proliferation of Ae. aegypti. The results of such studies therefore should not be assumed to apply in areas with different socioeconomic conditions or composition of container-inhabiting mosquito species. For example, results from field-based studies at the high altitude cool margins for Ae. aegypti in Mexico's central highlands or the Andes in South America cannot be assumed to be directly applicable to geographic areas in the United States with comparable climate conditions. Unfortunately, we have a very poor understanding of how climatic drivers interact with the human landscape and biological competitors to impact establishment and proliferation of Ae. aegypti at the cool margin of its range in the continental United States. A first step toward assessing the future threat this mosquito poses to human health in the continental United States is to design and conduct studies across strategic climatic and socioeconomic gradients in the United States (including the U.S.-Mexico border area) to determine the permissiveness of the coupled natural and human environment for Ae. aegypti at the present time. This approach will require experimental studies and field surveys that focus specifically on climate conditions relevant to the continental United States. These studies also must include assessments of how the human landscape, particularly the impact of availability of larval developmental sites and the permissiveness of homes for mosquito intrusion, and the presence of other container-inhabiting mosquitoes that may compete with Ae. aegypti for larval habitat affects the ability of Ae. aegypti to establish and proliferate. Until we are armed with such knowledge, it is not possible to meaningfully assess the potential for climate warming to impact the proliferation potential for Ae. aegypti in the United States outside of the geographic areas where the mosquito already is firmly established, and even less so for dengue virus transmission and dengue disease in humans.
PubMed ID
23802440 View in PubMed
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Agroecosystems shape population genetic structure of the greenhouse whitefly in Northern and Southern Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258712
Source
BMC Evol Biol. 2014;14:165
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Irina Ovcarenko
Despoina Evripidis Kapantaidaki
Leena Lindström
Nathalie Gauthier
Anastasia Tsagkarakou
Karelyn Emily Knott
Irene Vänninen
Source
BMC Evol Biol. 2014;14:165
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate change
Ecosystem
Female
Finland
Gene Flow
Genetics, Population
Greece
Hemiptera - classification - genetics
Microsatellite Repeats
Abstract
To predict further invasions of pests it is important to understand what factors contribute to the genetic structure of their populations. Cosmopolitan pest species are ideal for studying how different agroecosystems affect population genetic structure within a species at different climatic extremes. We undertook the first population genetic study of the greenhouse whitefly (Trialeurodes vaporariorum), a cosmopolitan invasive herbivore, and examined the genetic structure of this species in Northern and Southern Europe. In Finland, cold temperatures limit whiteflies to greenhouses and prevent them from overwintering in nature, and in Greece, milder temperatures allow whiteflies to inhabit both fields and greenhouses year round, providing a greater potential for connectivity among populations. Using nine microsatellite markers, we genotyped 1274 T. vaporariorum females collected from 18 greenhouses in Finland and eight greenhouses as well as eight fields in Greece.
Populations from Finland were less diverse than those from Greece, suggesting that Greek populations are larger and subjected to fewer bottlenecks. Moreover, there was significant population genetic structure in both countries that was explained by different factors. Habitat (field vs. greenhouse) together with longitude explained genetic structure in Greece, whereas in Finland, genetic structure was explained by host plant species. Furthermore, there was no temporal genetic structure among populations in Finland, suggesting that year-round populations are able to persist in greenhouses.
Taken together our results show that greenhouse agroecosystems can limit gene flow among populations in both climate zones. Fragmented populations in greenhouses could allow for efficient pest management. However, pest persistence in both climate zones, coupled with increasing opportunities for naturalization in temperate latitudes due to climate change, highlight challenges for the management of cosmopolitan pests in Northern and Southern Europe.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25266268 View in PubMed
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Alaska fish adjust to climate change by following the food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266474
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Feb 15;91(1):11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2015
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Feb 15;91(1):11
Date
Feb-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Climate change
Feeding Behavior
Fishes - physiology
PubMed ID
25806382 View in PubMed
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Alaskan wild berry resources and human health under the cloud of climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146583
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2010
Author
Joshua Kellogg
Jinzhi Wang
Courtney Flint
David Ribnicky
Peter Kuhn
Elvira González De Mejia
Ilya Raskin
Mary Ann Lila
Author Affiliation
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA.
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-900
Date
Apr-14-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Anthocyanins - analysis - pharmacology
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Cell Line
Climate change
Fruit - chemistry
Health
Humans
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Obesity - drug therapy
Plant Extracts - analysis - metabolism - pharmacology
Random Allocation
Rosaceae - chemistry
Abstract
Wild berries are integral dietary components for Alaska Native people and a rich source of polyphenolic metabolites that can ameliorate metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. In this study, five species of wild Alaskan berries (Vaccinium ovalifolium , Vaccinium uliginosum , Rubus chamaemorus , Rubus spectabilis , and Empetrum nigrum) were screened for bioactivity through a community-participatory research method involving three geographically distinct tribal communities. Compositional analysis by HPLC and LC-MS(2) revealed substantial site-specific variation in anthocyanins (0.01-4.39 mg/g of FW) and proanthocyanidins (0.74-6.25 mg/g of FW) and identified A-type proanthocyanidin polymers. R. spectabilis increased expression levels of preadipocyte factor 1 (182%), and proanthocyanidin-enriched fractions from other species reduced lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Selected extracts reduced serum glucose levels in C57BL/6J mice by up to 45%. Local observations provided robust insights into effects of climatic fluctuations on berry abundance and quality, and preliminary site-specific compositional and bioactivity differences were noted, suggesting the need to monitor this Alaska Native resource as climate shifts affect the region.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20025229 View in PubMed
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Alder, Nitrogen, and Lake Ecology: Terrestrial-Aquatic Linkages in the Postglacial History of Lone Spruce Pond, Southwestern Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284914
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0169106
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Bianca B Perren
Yarrow Axford
Darrell S Kaufman
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0169106
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Alnus - growth & development - metabolism
Animals
Biota
Climate
Climate change
Diatoms - physiology
Ecosystem
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Lakes - chemistry
Nitrogen - metabolism
Picea - growth & development - metabolism
Ponds - chemistry
Soil
Abstract
Diatoms, combined with a multiproxy study of lake sediments (organic matter, N, d15N, d13C, biogenic silica, grain size, Cladocera and chironomids, Alnus pollen) from Lone Spruce Pond, Alaska detail the late-glacial to Holocene history of the lake and its response to regional climate and landscape change over the last 14.5 cal ka BP. We show that the immigration of alder (Alnus viridis) in the early Holocene marks the rise of available reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the lake as well as the establishment of a primarily planktonic diatom community. The later establishment of diatom Discostella stelligera is coupled to a rise of sedimentary d15N, indicating diminished competition for this nutrient. This terrestrial-aquatic linkage demonstrates how profoundly vegetation may affect soil geochemistry, lake development, and lake ecology over millennial timescales. Furthermore, the response of the diatom community to strengthened stratification and N levels in the past confirms the sensitivity of planktonic diatom communities to changing thermal and nutrient regimes. These past ecosystem dynamics serve as an analogue for the nature of threshold-type ecological responses to current climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (Nr) deposition, but also for the larger changes we should anticipate under future climate, pollution, and vegetation succession scenarios in high-latitude and high-elevation regions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28076393 View in PubMed
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The alternative prey hypothesis revisited: Still valid for willow ptarmigan population dynamics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296187
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0197289
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Jo Inge Breisjøberget
Morten Odden
Per Wegge
Barbara Zimmermann
Harry Andreassen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Ecology and Agricultural Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, Koppang, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0197289
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Betula - growth & development
Climate change
Food chain
Foxes - physiology
Models, Biological
Norway
Population Dynamics
Rodentia - physiology
Salix - growth & development
Abstract
The alternative prey hypothesis predicts that the interaction between generalist predators and their main prey is a major driver of population dynamics of alternative prey species. In Fennoscandia, changes in climate and human land use are assumed to alter the dynamics of cyclic small rodents (main prey) and lead to increased densities and range expansion of an important generalist predator, the red fox Vulpes vulpes. In order to better understand the role of these potential changes in community structure on an alternative prey species, willow ptarmigan Lagopus lagopus, we analyzed nine years of population census data from SE Norway to investigate how community interactions affected their population dynamics. The ptarmigan populations showed no declining trend during the study period, and annual variations corresponded with marked periodic small rodent peaks and declines. Population growth and breeding success were highly correlated, and both demographic variables were influenced by an interaction between red fox and small rodents. Red foxes affected ptarmigan negatively only when small rodent abundance was low, which is in accordance with the alternative prey hypothesis. Our results confirm the important role of red fox predation in ptarmigan dynamics, and indicate that if small rodent cycles are disrupted, this may lead to decline in ptarmigan and other alternative prey species due to elevated predation pressure.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29874270 View in PubMed
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Aphid-willow interactions in a high Arctic ecosystem: responses to raised temperature and goose disturbance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258051
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2013 Dec;19(12):3698-708
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Mark A K Gillespie
Ingibjörg S Jónsdóttir
Ian D Hodkinson
Elisabeth J Cooper
Author Affiliation
Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2013 Dec;19(12):3698-708
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Aphids - growth & development - physiology
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Geese - physiology
Herbivory
Population Dynamics
Reproduction
Salix - growth & development - physiology
Seasons
Svalbard
Temperature
Abstract
Recently, there have been several studies using open top chambers (OTCs) or cloches to examine the response of Arctic plant communities to artificially elevated temperatures. Few, however, have investigated multitrophic systems, or the effects of both temperature and vertebrate grazing treatments on invertebrates. This study investigated trophic interactions between an herbivorous insect (Sitobion calvulum, Aphididae), a woody perennial host plant (Salix polaris) and a selective vertebrate grazer (barnacle geese, Branta leucopsis). In a factorial experiment, the responses of the insect and its host to elevated temperatures using open top chambers (OTCs) and to three levels of goose grazing pressure were assessed over two summer growing seasons (2004 and 2005). OTCs significantly enhanced the leaf phenology of Salix in both years and there was a significant OTC by goose presence interaction in 2004. Salix leaf number was unaffected by treatments in both years, but OTCs increased leaf size and mass in 2005. Salix reproduction and the phenology of flowers were unaffected by both treatments. Aphid densities were increased by OTCs but unaffected by goose presence in both years. While goose presence had little effect on aphid density or host plant phenology in this system, the OTC effects provide interesting insights into the possibility of phenological synchrony disruption. The advanced phenology of Salix effectively lengthens the growing season for the plant, but despite a close association with leaf maturity, the population dynamics of the aphid appeared to lack a similar phenological response, except for the increased population observed.
PubMed ID
23749580 View in PubMed
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148 records – page 1 of 15.