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Adaptation in Arctic circumpolar communities: food and water security in a changing climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289270
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33820
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
James Berner
Michael Brubaker
Boris Revitch
Eva Kreummel
Moses Tcheripanoff
Jake Bell
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA; jberner@anthc.org.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33820
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Communicable diseases
Community-Based Participatory Research
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Rural Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Water supply
Abstract
The AMAP Human Health Assessment Group has developed different adaptation strategies through a long-term collaboration with all Arctic countries. Different adaptation strategies are discussed, with examples mainly from native population groups in Alaska.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27974139 View in PubMed
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[Adaptive features of the ecology and annual cycle of the willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus L.) at the northern boundary of the Siberian part of the range].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261514
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2014 Nov-Dec;(6):605-15
Publication Type
Article
Author
V N Ryzhanovskii
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2014 Nov-Dec;(6):605-15
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animal Migration
Animals
Climate change
Cold Climate
Feathers - anatomy & histology - physiology
Female
Flight, Animal - physiology
Male
Molting - physiology
Passeriformes - growth & development - physiology
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Siberia
Abstract
The ecology of the willow warbler in the north of Western Siberia is considered, and the adaptations that enable the spread of this species to the Subarctic are analyzed. It is established that one of the key factors that caused the change in the range of this species is the northward distribution of shrubs and, hence, the biomass of insects (available food items of these birds).
PubMed ID
25739309 View in PubMed
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Challenges to adaptation in northernmost Europe as a result of global climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143358
Source
Ambio. 2010 Feb;39(1):81-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Christer Nilsson
Roland Jansson
E Carina H Keskitalo
Tatiana Vlassova
Marja-Liisa Sutinen
Jon Moen
F Stuart Chapin
Author Affiliation
Landscape Ecology Group, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden. christer.nilsson@emg.umu.se
Source
Ambio. 2010 Feb;39(1):81-4
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Commerce
Conservation of Natural Resources
Europe
Finland
Geography
Humans
Norway
Russia
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
World Health
Notes
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PubMed ID
20496656 View in PubMed
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Climate change and health in british columbia: projected impacts and a proposed agenda for adaptation research and policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142281
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 Mar;7(3):1018-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Aleck Ostry
Malcolm Ogborn
Kate L Bassil
Tim K Takaro
Diana M Allen
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. ostry@uvic.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 Mar;7(3):1018-35
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
British Columbia
Climate change
Health status
Humans
Abstract
This is a case study describing how climate change may affect the health of British Columbians and to suggest a way forward to promote health and policy research, and adaptation to these changes. After reviewing the limited evidence of the impacts of climate change on human health we have developed five principles to guide the development of research and policy to better predict future impacts of climate change on health and to enhance adaptation to these change in BC. We suggest that, with some modification, these principles will be useful to policy makers in other jurisdictions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20617016 View in PubMed
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Climate change and water security with a focus on the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130014
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:65-68.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Climate change and water security with a focus on the Arctic Birgitta Evengard1*, Jim Berner2, Michael Brubaker2, Gert Mulvad3 and Boris Revich4 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 2Center for Climate and Health, Alaska Native
  1 document  
Author
Birgitta Evengard
Jim Berner
Michael Brubaker
Gert Mulvad
Boris Revich
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. birgitta.evengard@climi.umu.se
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:65-68.
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
216402
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Arctic Regions
Climate
Climate change
Environmental monitoring
Health status
Humans
Water Cycle
Water supply
Abstract
Water is of fundamental importance for human life; access to water of good quality is of vital concern for mankind. Currently however, the situation is under severe pressure due to several stressors that have a clear impact on access to water. In the Arctic, climate change is having an impact on water availability by melting glaciers, decreasing seasonal rates of precipitation, increasing evapotranspiration, and drying lakes and rivers existing in permafrost grounds. Water quality is also being impacted as manmade pollutants stored in the environment are released, lowland areas are flooded with salty ocean water during storms, turbidity from permafrost-driven thaw and erosion is increased, and the growth or emergence of natural pollutants are increased. By 2030 it is estimated that the world will need to produce 50% more food and energy which means a continuous increase in demand for water. Decisionmakers will have to very clearly include life quality aspects of future generations in the work as impact of ongoing changes will be noticeable, in many cases, in the future. This article will focus on effects of climate-change on water security with an Arctic perspective giving some examples from different countries how arising problems are being addressed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22043217 View in PubMed
Documents

Evengard-Climate-change.pdf

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Climate change poses health threats in Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129093
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Jan 10;184(1):E33-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2012
Author
Becky Rynor
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Jan 10;184(1):E33-4
Date
Jan-10-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Health status
Humans
PubMed ID
22143228 View in PubMed
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Community-based participatory process--climate change and health adaptation program for Northern First Nations and Inuit in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124412
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Diane McClymont Peace
Erin Myers
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Research Division, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. diane.mcclymontpeace@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Canada
Climate change
Community-Based Participatory Research
Health planning
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Abstract
Health Canada's Program for Climate Change and Health Adaptation in Northern First Nation and Inuit Communities is unique among Canadian federal programs in that it enables community-based participatory research by northern communities.
The program was designed to build capacity by funding communities to conduct their own research in cooperation with Aboriginal associations, academics, and governments; that way, communities could develop health-related adaptation plans and communication materials that would help in adaptation decision-making at the community, regional, national and circumpolar levels with respect to human health and a changing environment.
Community visits and workshops were held to familiarize northerners with the impacts of climate change on their health, as well as methods to develop research proposals and budgets to meet program requirements.
Since the launch of the Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program in 2008, Health Canada has funded 36 community projects across Canada's North that focus on relevant health issues caused by climate change. In addition, the program supported capacity-building workshops for northerners, as well as a Pan-Arctic Results Workshop to bring communities together to showcase the results of their research. Results include: numerous films and photo-voice products that engage youth and elders and are available on the web; community-based ice monitoring, surveillance and communication networks; and information products on land, water and ice safety, drinking water, food security and safety, and traditional medicine.
Through these efforts, communities have increased their knowledge and understanding of the health effects related to climate change and have begun to develop local adaptation strategies.
PubMed ID
22584509 View in PubMed
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Drought tolerance and growth in populations of a wide-ranging tree species indicate climate change risks for the boreal north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277679
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2016 Feb;22(2):806-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
David Montwé
Miriam Isaac-Renton
Andreas Hamann
Heinrich Spiecker
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2016 Feb;22(2):806-15
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
British Columbia
Climate change
Droughts
Forests
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genotype
Pinus - genetics - growth & development - physiology
Temperature
United States
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Choosing drought-tolerant planting stock in reforestation programs may help adapt forests to climate change. To inform such reforestation strategies, we test lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Doug. ex Loud. var latifolia Englm.) population response to drought and infer potential benefits of a northward transfer of seeds from drier, southern environments. The objective is addressed by combining dendroecological growth analysis with long-term genetic field trials. Over 500 trees originating from 23 populations across western North America were destructively sampled in three experimental sites in southern British Columbia, representing a climate warming scenario. Growth after 32 years from provenances transferred southward or northward over long distances was significantly lower than growth of local populations. All populations were affected by a severe natural drought event in 2002. The provenances from the most southern locations showed the highest drought tolerance but low productivity. Local provenances were productive and drought tolerant. Provenances from the boreal north showed lower productivity and less drought tolerance on southern test sites than all other sources, implying that maladaptation to drought may prevent boreal populations from taking full advantage of more favorable growing conditions under projected climate change.
PubMed ID
26463121 View in PubMed
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The effects of changing climate on faunal depth distributions determine winners and losers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265957
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2015 Jan;21(1):173-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Alastair Brown
Sven Thatje
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2015 Jan;21(1):173-80
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animal Distribution
Animals
Anoxia
Climate change
Fishes - metabolism - physiology
Invertebrates - metabolism - physiology
Oceans and Seas
Pressure - adverse effects
Temperature
Abstract
Changing climate is predicted to impact all depths of the global oceans, yet projections of range shifts in marine faunal distributions in response to changing climate seldom evaluate potential shifts in depth distribution. Marine ectotherms' thermal tolerance is limited by their ability to maintain aerobic metabolism (oxygen- and capacity-limited tolerance), and is functionally associated with their hypoxia tolerance. Shallow-water (
Notes
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PubMed ID
25044552 View in PubMed
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Forecasting future recruitment success for Atlantic cod in the warming and acidifying Barents Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295325
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 01; 24(1):526-535
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Stefan Koenigstein
Flemming T Dahlke
Martina H Stiasny
Daniela Storch
Catriona Clemmesen
Hans-Otto Pörtner
Author Affiliation
University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 01; 24(1):526-535
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Climate change
Ecosystem
Gadus morhua - physiology
Larva
Oceans and Seas
Population Dynamics
Reproduction
Temperature
Abstract
Productivity of marine fish stocks is known to be affected by environmental and ecological drivers, and global climate change is anticipated to alter recruitment success of many stocks. While the direct effects of environmental drivers on fish early life stage survival can be quantified experimentally, indirect effects in marine ecosystems and the role of adaptation are still highly uncertain. We developed an integrative model for the effects of ocean warming and acidification on the early life stages of Atlantic cod in the Barents Sea, termed SCREI (Simulator of Cod Recruitment under Environmental Influences). Experimental results on temperature and CO2 effects on egg fertilization, egg and larval survival and development times are incorporated. Calibration using empirical time series of egg production, temperature, food and predator abundance reproduces age-0 recruitment over three decades. We project trajectories of recruitment success under different scenarios and quantify confidence limits based on variation in experiments. A publicly accessible web version of the SCREI model can be run under www.oceanchange.uni-bremen.de/;SCREI. Severe reductions in average age-0 recruitment success of Barents Sea cod are projected under uncompensated warming and acidification toward the middle to end of this century. Although high population stochasticity was found, considerable rates of evolutionary adaptation to acidification and shifts in organismal thermal windows would be needed to buffer impacts on recruitment. While increases in food availability may mitigate short-term impacts, an increase in egg production achieved by stock management could provide more long-term safety for cod recruitment success. The SCREI model provides a novel integration of multiple driver effects in different life stages and enables an estimation of uncertainty associated with interindividual and ecological variation. The model thus helps to advance toward an improved empirical foundation for quantifying climate change impacts on marine fish recruitment, relevant for ecosystem-based assessments of marine systems under climate change.
PubMed ID
28755499 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.