Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Alpine soil microbial ecology in a changing world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301151
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 09 01; 94(9):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
09-01-2018
Author
Johanna Donhauser
Beat Frey
Author Affiliation
Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 09 01; 94(9):
Date
09-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Climate change
Ice Cover
Permafrost - chemistry - microbiology
Soil Microbiology
Tundra
Abstract
Climate change has a disproportionally large impact on alpine soil ecosystems, leading to pronounced changes in soil microbial diversity and function associated with effects on biogeochemical processes at the local and supraregional scales. However, due to restricted accessibility, high-altitude soils remain largely understudied and a considerable heterogeneity hampers the comparability of different alpine studies. Here, we highlight differences and similarities between alpine and arctic ecosystems, and we discuss the impact of climatic variables and associated vegetation and soil properties on microbial ecology. We consider how microbial alpha-diversity, community structures and function change along altitudinal gradients and with other topographic features such as slope aspect. In addition, we focus on alpine permafrost soils, harboring a surprisingly large unknown microbial diversity and on microbial succession along glacier forefield chronosequences constituting the most thoroughly studied alpine habitat. Finally, highlighting experimental approaches, we present climate change studies showing shifts in microbial community structures and function in response to warming and altered moisture, interestingly with some contradiction. Collectively, despite harsh environmental conditions, many specially adapted microorganisms are able to thrive in alpine environments. Their community structures strongly correlate with climatic, vegetation and soil properties and thus closely mirror the complexity and small-scale heterogeneity of alpine soils.
PubMed ID
30032189 View in PubMed
Less detail

Avoiding a crisis of motivation for ocean management under global environmental change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294930
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 11; 23(11):4483-4496
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2017
Author
Peter J Mumby
James N Sanchirico
Kenneth Broad
Michael W Beck
Peter Tyedmers
Megan Morikawa
Thomas A Okey
Larry B Crowder
Elizabeth A Fulton
Denny Kelso
Joanie A Kleypas
Stephan B Munch
Polita Glynn
Kathryn Matthews
Jane Lubchenco
Author Affiliation
Marine Spatial Ecology Lab & ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld, Australia.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 11; 23(11):4483-4496
Date
11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Coral Reefs
Ecosystem
Fishes
Humans
Motivation
Oceans and Seas
Abstract
Climate change and ocean acidification are altering marine ecosystems and, from a human perspective, creating both winners and losers. Human responses to these changes are complex, but may result in reduced government investments in regulation, resource management, monitoring and enforcement. Moreover, a lack of peoples' experience of climate change may drive some towards attributing the symptoms of climate change to more familiar causes such as management failure. Taken together, we anticipate that management could become weaker and less effective as climate change continues. Using diverse case studies, including the decline of coral reefs, coastal defences from flooding, shifting fish stocks and the emergence of new shipping opportunities in the Arctic, we argue that human interests are better served by increased investments in resource management. But greater government investment in management does not simply mean more of "business-as-usual." Management needs to become more flexible, better at anticipating and responding to surprise, and able to facilitate change where it is desirable. A range of technological, economic, communication and governance solutions exists to help transform management. While not all have been tested, judicious application of the most appropriate solutions should help humanity adapt to novel circumstances and seek opportunity where possible.
PubMed ID
28447373 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate change opens new frontiers for marine species in the Arctic: Current trends and future invasion risks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298566
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2019 01; 25(1):25-38
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
01-2019
Author
Farrah T Chan
Keara Stanislawczyk
Anna C Sneekes
Alexander Dvoretsky
Stephan Gollasch
Dan Minchin
Matej David
Anders Jelmert
Jon Albretsen
Sarah A Bailey
Author Affiliation
Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Burlington, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2019 01; 25(1):25-38
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Animals
Aquatic Organisms - physiology
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Climate change
Ecosystem
Introduced Species - statistics & numerical data - trends
Risk
Abstract
Climate change and increased anthropogenic activities are expected to elevate the potential of introducing nonindigenous species (NIS) into the Arctic. Yet, the knowledge base needed to identify gaps and priorities for NIS research and management is limited. Here, we reviewed primary introduction events to each ecoregion of the marine Arctic realm to identify temporal and spatial patterns, likely source regions of NIS, and the putative introduction pathways. We included 54 introduction events representing 34 unique NIS. The rate of NIS discovery ranged from zero to four species per year between 1960 and 2015. The Iceland Shelf had the greatest number of introduction events (n = 14), followed by the Barents Sea (n = 11), and the Norwegian Sea (n = 11). Sixteen of the 54 introduction records had no known origins. The majority of those with known source regions were attributed to the Northeast Atlantic and the Northwest Pacific, 19 and 14 records, respectively. Some introduction events were attributed to multiple possible pathways. For these introductions, vessels transferred the greatest number of aquatic NIS (39%) to the Arctic, followed by natural spread (30%) and aquaculture activities (25%). Similar trends were found for introductions attributed to a single pathway. The phyla Arthropoda and Ochrophyta had the highest number of recorded introduction events, with 19 and 12 records, respectively. Recommendations including vector management, horizon scanning, early detection, rapid response, and a pan-Arctic biodiversity inventory are considered in this paper. Our study provides a comprehensive record of primary introductions of NIS for marine environments in the circumpolar Arctic and identifies knowledge gaps and opportunities for NIS research and management. Ecosystems worldwide will face dramatic changes in the coming decades due to global change. Our findings contribute to the knowledge base needed to address two aspects of global change-invasive species and climate change.
PubMed ID
30295388 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Holistic Effects of Climate Change on the Culture, Well-Being, and Health of the Saami, the Only Indigenous People in the European Union.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300928
Source
Curr Environ Health Rep. 2018 12; 5(4):401-417
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Suvi Juntunen
Klemetti Näkkäläjärvi
Author Affiliation
Center for Environmental and Respiratory Health Research, University of Oulu, P. O. Box 5000, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland. jouni.jaakkola@oulu.fi.
Source
Curr Environ Health Rep. 2018 12; 5(4):401-417
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Climate change
Cultural Characteristics
European Union
Health status
Humans
Mental health
Population Groups
Seasons
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
(1) To develop a framework for understanding the holistic effects of climate change on the Saami people; (2) to summarize the scientific evidence about the primary, secondary, and tertiary effects of climate change on Saami culture and Sápmi region; and (3) to identify gaps in the knowledge of the effects of climate change on health and well-being of the Saami.
The Saami health is on average similar, or slightly better compared to the health of other populations in the same area. Warming climate has already influenced Saami reindeer culture. Mental health and suicide risk partly linked to changing physical and social environments are major concerns. The lifestyle, diet, and morbidity of the Saami are changing to resemble the majority populations posing threats for the health of the Saami and making them more vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. Climate change is a threat for the cultural way of life of Saami. Possibilities for Saami to adapt to climate change are limited.
PubMed ID
30350264 View in PubMed
Less detail

Human infectious diseases and the changing climate in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298985
Source
Environ Int. 2018 12; 121(Pt 1):703-713
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Audrey Waits
Anastasia Emelyanova
Antti Oksanen
Khaled Abass
Arja Rautio
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Environ Int. 2018 12; 121(Pt 1):703-713
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Climate
Climate change
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Weather
Abstract
Climatic factors, especially temperature, precipitation, and humidity play an important role in disease transmission. As the Arctic changes at an unprecedented rate due to climate change, understanding how climatic factors and climate change affect infectious disease rates is important for minimizing human and economic costs. The purpose of this systematic review was to compile recent studies in the field and compare the results to a previously published review. English language searches were conducted in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and PLOS One. Russian language searches were conducted in the Scientific Electronic Library "eLibrary.ru". This systematic review yielded 22 articles (51%) published in English and 21 articles (49%) published in Russian since 2012. Articles about zoonotic and vector-borne diseases accounted for 67% (n?=?29) of the review. Tick-borne diseases, tularemia, anthrax, and vibriosis were the most researched diseases likely to be impacted by climatic factors in the Arctic. Increased temperature and precipitation are predicted to have the greatest impact on infectious diseases in the Arctic.
PubMed ID
30317100 View in PubMed
Less detail

Microbial diversity and biogeography in Arctic soils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298946
Source
Environ Microbiol Rep. 2018 12; 10(6):611-625
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Lucie A Malard
David A Pearce
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK.
Source
Environ Microbiol Rep. 2018 12; 10(6):611-625
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Carbon - metabolism
Climate change
Cold Climate
Environment
Greenhouse Gases - metabolism
Soil - chemistry
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
Microorganisms dominate terrestrial environments in the polar regions and Arctic soils are known to harbour significant microbial diversity, far more diverse and numerous in the region than was once thought. Furthermore, the geographic distribution and structure of Arctic microbial communities remains elusive, despite their important roles in both biogeochemical cycling and in the generation and decomposition of climate active gases. Critically, Arctic soils are estimated to store over 1500 Pg of carbon and, thus, have the potential to generate positive feedback within the climate system. As the Arctic region is currently undergoing rapid change, the likelihood of faster release of greenhouse gases such as CO2 , CH4 and N2 O is increasing. Understanding the microbial communities in the region, in terms of their diversity, abundance and functional activity, is key to producing accurate models of greenhouse gas release. This review brings together existing data to determine what we know about microbial diversity and biogeography in Arctic soils.
PubMed ID
30028082 View in PubMed
Less detail

Persistent organic pollutants in the polar regions and the Tibetan Plateau: A review of current knowledge and future prospects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301586
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 May; 248:191-208
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
May-2019
Author
Xiaoping Wang
Chuanfei Wang
Tingting Zhu
Ping Gong
Jianjie Fu
Zhiyuan Cong
Author Affiliation
Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing, 100101, China; CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, China. Electronic address: wangxp@itpcas.ac.cn.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 May; 248:191-208
Date
May-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Cold Climate
DDT
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Food chain
Forecasting
Hexachlorocyclohexane
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Soil
Tibet
Abstract
Due to their low temperatures, the Arctic, Antarctic and Tibetan Plateau are known as the three polar regions of the Earth. As the most remote regions of the globe, the occurrence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in these polar regions arouses global concern. In this paper, we review the literatures on POPs involving these three polar regions. Overall, concentrations of POPs in the environment (air, water, soil and biota) have been extensively reported, with higher levels of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) detected on the Tibetan Plateau. The spatial distribution of POPs in air, water and soil in the three polar regions broadly reflects their distances away from source regions. Based on long-term data, decreasing trends have been observed for most "legacy POPs". Observations of transport processes of POPs among multiple media have also been carried out, including air-water gas exchange, air-soil gas exchange, emissions from melting glaciers, bioaccumulations along food chains, and exposure risks. The impact of climate change on these processes possibly enhances the re-emission processes of POPs out of water, soil and glaciers, and reduces the bioaccumulation of POPs in food chains. Global POPs transport model have shown the Arctic receives a relatively small fraction of POPs, but that climate change will likely increase the total mass of all compounds in this polar region. Considering the impact of climate change on POPs is still unclear, long-term monitoring data and global/regional models are required, especially in the Antarctic and on the Tibetan Plateau, and the fate of POPs in all three polar regions needs to be comprehensively studied and compared to yield a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the global cycling of POPs.
PubMed ID
30784838 View in PubMed
Less detail

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as sentinels for the elucidation of Arctic environmental change processes: a comprehensive review combined with ArcRisk project results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299344
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Aug; 25(23):22499-22528
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Pernilla Carlsson
Knut Breivik
Eva Brorström-Lundén
Ian Cousins
Jesper Christensen
Joan O Grimalt
Crispin Halsall
Roland Kallenborn
Khaled Abass
Gerhard Lammel
John Munthe
Matthew MacLeod
Jon Øyvind Odland
Janet Pawlak
Arja Rautio
Lars-Otto Reiersen
Martin Schlabach
Irene Stemmler
Simon Wilson
Henry Wöhrnschimmel
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), 0349, Oslo, Norway. pernilla.carlsson@niva.no.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Aug; 25(23):22499-22528
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Ice
Models, Theoretical
Oceans and Seas
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Rivers - chemistry
Seasons
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can be used as chemical sentinels for the assessment of anthropogenic influences on Arctic environmental change. We present an overview of studies on PCBs in the Arctic and combine these with the findings from ArcRisk-a major European Union-funded project aimed at examining the effects of climate change on the transport of contaminants to and their behaviour of in the Arctic-to provide a case study on the behaviour and impact of PCBs over time in the Arctic. PCBs in the Arctic have shown declining trends in the environment over the last few decades. Atmospheric long-range transport from secondary and primary sources is the major input of PCBs to the Arctic region. Modelling of the atmospheric PCB composition and behaviour showed some increases in environmental concentrations in a warmer Arctic, but the general decline in PCB levels is still the most prominent feature. 'Within-Arctic' processing of PCBs will be affected by climate change-related processes such as changing wet deposition. These in turn will influence biological exposure and uptake of PCBs. The pan-Arctic rivers draining large Arctic/sub-Arctic catchments provide a significant source of PCBs to the Arctic Ocean, although changes in hydrology/sediment transport combined with a changing marine environment remain areas of uncertainty with regard to PCB fate. Indirect effects of climate change on human exposure, such as a changing diet will influence and possibly reduce PCB exposure for indigenous peoples. Body burdens of PCBs have declined since the 1980s and are predicted to decline further.
PubMed ID
29956262 View in PubMed
Less detail

Rabies in Alaska, from the past to an uncertain future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298077
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1475185
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Karsten Hueffer
Molly Murphy
Author Affiliation
a Department of Veterinary Medicine , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , Alaska , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1475185
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Animals, Wild - virology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Chiroptera - virology
Climate change
Dogs - virology
Ecology
Forecasting
Foxes - virology
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Rabies - epidemiology - history
Rabies virus
Abstract
Rabies is a serious zoonotic disease with significant public health consequences in the circumpolar North. Recent studies have advanced our understanding of the disease ecology in Alaska. In this paper, we review historical records of rabies in Alaska ranging from the late nineteenth century to the present, analyse the public health impact in the state and review studies on disease ecology before assessing challenges and anticipated altered disease dynamics in the face of a rapidly changing North. Rabies is a disease that has been present in Alaska continuously for over 100 years. It is maintained in bats and foxes with the arctic fox likely playing a bigger role in maintaining the virus, although a multi-host system with both red and arctic foxes cannot be excluded. Some modelling evidence suggest a possible decrease in rabies due to a changing climate, although uncertainty is high around these predictions for rabies distribution in Alaska into the future.
PubMed ID
29764319 View in PubMed
Less detail

A review of global environmental mercury processes in response to human and natural perturbations: Changes of emissions, climate, and land use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295713
Source
Ambio. 2018 Mar; 47(2):116-140
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Daniel Obrist
Jane L Kirk
Lei Zhang
Elsie M Sunderland
Martin Jiskra
Noelle E Selin
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Ave, Lowell, MA, 01854, USA. daniel_obrist@uml.edu.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Mar; 47(2):116-140
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
China
Climate change
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - chemistry - toxicity
Europe
Humans
India
Indian Ocean
Mercury - analysis - chemistry - toxicity
Abstract
We review recent progress in our understanding of the global cycling of mercury (Hg), including best estimates of Hg concentrations and pool sizes in major environmental compartments and exchange processes within and between these reservoirs. Recent advances include the availability of new global datasets covering areas of the world where environmental Hg data were previously lacking; integration of these data into global and regional models is continually improving estimates of global Hg cycling. New analytical techniques, such as Hg stable isotope characterization, provide novel constraints of sources and transformation processes. The major global Hg reservoirs that are, and continue to be, affected by anthropogenic activities include the atmosphere (4.4-5.3 Gt), terrestrial environments (particularly soils: 250-1000 Gg), and aquatic ecosystems (e.g., oceans: 270-450 Gg). Declines in anthropogenic Hg emissions between 1990 and 2010 have led to declines in atmospheric Hg0 concentrations and HgII wet deposition in Europe and the US (- 1.5 to - 2.2% per year). Smaller atmospheric Hg0 declines (- 0.2% per year) have been reported in high northern latitudes, but not in the southern hemisphere, while increasing atmospheric Hg loads are still reported in East Asia. New observations and updated models now suggest high concentrations of oxidized HgII in the tropical and subtropical free troposphere where deep convection can scavenge these HgII reservoirs. As a result, up to 50% of total global wet HgII deposition has been predicted to occur to tropical oceans. Ocean Hg0 evasion is a large source of present-day atmospheric Hg (approximately 2900 Mg/year; range 1900-4200 Mg/year). Enhanced seawater Hg0 levels suggest enhanced Hg0 ocean evasion in the intertropical convergence zone, which may be linked to high HgII deposition. Estimates of gaseous Hg0 emissions to the atmosphere over land, long considered a critical Hg source, have been revised downward, and most terrestrial environments now are considered net sinks of atmospheric Hg due to substantial Hg uptake by plants. Litterfall deposition by plants is now estimated at 1020-1230 Mg/year globally. Stable isotope analysis and direct flux measurements provide evidence that in many ecosystems Hg0 deposition via plant inputs dominates, accounting for 57-94% of Hg in soils. Of global aquatic Hg releases, around 50% are estimated to occur in China and India, where Hg drains into the West Pacific and North Indian Oceans. A first inventory of global freshwater Hg suggests that inland freshwater Hg releases may be dominated by artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM; approximately 880 Mg/year), industrial and wastewater releases (220 Mg/year), and terrestrial mobilization (170-300 Mg/year). For pelagic ocean regions, the dominant source of Hg is atmospheric deposition; an exception is the Arctic Ocean, where riverine and coastal erosion is likely the dominant source. Ocean water Hg concentrations in the North Atlantic appear to have declined during the last several decades but have increased since the mid-1980s in the Pacific due to enhanced atmospheric deposition from the Asian continent. Finally, we provide examples of ongoing and anticipated changes in Hg cycling due to emission, climate, and land use changes. It is anticipated that future emissions changes will be strongly dependent on ASGM, as well as energy use scenarios and technology requirements implemented under the Minamata Convention. We predict that land use and climate change impacts on Hg cycling will be large and inherently linked to changes in ecosystem function and global atmospheric and ocean circulations. Our ability to predict multiple and simultaneous changes in future Hg global cycling and human exposure is rapidly developing but requires further enhancement.
Notes
Cites: Environ Microbiol Rep. 2014 Oct;6(5):441-7 PMID 25646534
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Jul 1;43(13):4802-9 PMID 19673268
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Sep 22;112(38):11789-94 PMID 26351688
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jun 5;46(11):5921-30 PMID 22519552
Cites: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Feb;24(5):5001-5011 PMID 28000068
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Aug 6;47(15):8105-13 PMID 23834017
Cites: Science. 2013 Sep 27;341(6153):1457-8 PMID 24072910
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2013 Mar 15;448:163-75 PMID 23062970
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Jul 15;41(14):4851-60 PMID 17711193
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Feb 1;45(3):964-70 PMID 21210676
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Mar 1;44(5):1630-7 PMID 20104887
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Sep 22;106(38):16114-9 PMID 19805267
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2006 Aug 15;367(1):222-33 PMID 16406491
Cites: Science. 2013 Mar 15;339(6125):1332-5 PMID 23393089
Cites: Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci. 2016 Nov 28;374(2081): PMID 29035262
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Dec 6;50(23 ):12864-12873 PMID 27934281
Cites: Chem Rev. 2007 Feb;107(2):641-62 PMID 17300143
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Oct 15;47(20):11810-20 PMID 24024607
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2000 Oct 2;259(1-3):61-71 PMID 11032136
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jan 6;49(1):432-41 PMID 25485926
Cites: Nat Microbiol. 2016 Aug 01;1(10 ):16127 PMID 27670112
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2015 Dec 15;538:896-904 PMID 26363145
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Jun 6;51(11):5899-5906 PMID 28440654
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Mar 1;44(5):1698-704 PMID 20121085
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2014 Oct;80(20):6517-26 PMID 25107983
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:1157-70 PMID 27102272
Cites: Nature. 2017 Jul 12;547(7662):201-204 PMID 28703199
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2012 Feb;161:261-71 PMID 21745704
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Jul 15;44(14):5371-6 PMID 20553021
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 May 1;46(9):4933-40 PMID 22500567
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Mar 7;51(5):2846-2853 PMID 28191932
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Aug 7;46(15):7963-70 PMID 22747193
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Feb 18;48(4):2242-52 PMID 24428735
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Oct;79(20):6325-30 PMID 23934484
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Oct 7;48(19):11437-44 PMID 25192054
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:546-56 PMID 26803218
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Feb 7;51(3):1186-1194 PMID 28013537
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:578-86 PMID 26897612
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Aug 4;49(15):8977-85 PMID 26132925
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2004 Mar 15;38(6):1772-6 PMID 15074688
Cites: Environ Toxicol Chem. 2014 Jan;33(1):208-15 PMID 24302165
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Sep 6;50(17 ):9232-41 PMID 27501307
Cites: Science. 2006 Aug 18;313(5789):940-3 PMID 16825536
Cites: Water Res. 2015 Sep 1;80:245-55 PMID 26005785
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Mar 19;47(6):2441-56 PMID 23384298
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Aug 19;48(16):9514-22 PMID 25066365
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Apr 7;49(7):4036-47 PMID 25750991
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2013 Feb 15;445-446:126-35 PMID 23333508
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:522-35 PMID 26775833
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jul 15;487:299-312 PMID 24793327
Cites: Nature. 2014 Aug 7;512(7512):65-8 PMID 25100482
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Nov 15;44(22):8574-80 PMID 20973542
Cites: Sci Adv. 2015 Oct 09;1(9):e1500675 PMID 26601305
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Dec 1;41(23):8092-8 PMID 18186342
Cites: Sci Rep. 2015 May 20;5:10318 PMID 25993348
Cites: Environ Toxicol Chem. 2014 Jun;33(6):1202-10 PMID 24038450
Cites: Ecotoxicology. 2015 Mar;24(2):453-67 PMID 25492585
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Oct 16;104(42):16586-91 PMID 17901207
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:727-38 PMID 27130329
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2013 Nov;182:127-34 PMID 23911621
Cites: Chemosphere. 2017 Jul;178:42-50 PMID 28319740
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2012 Feb;161:284-90 PMID 21715069
Cites: Atmos Chem Phys. 2008 Dec 22;8(24):null PMID 24348525
Cites: Environ Toxicol Chem. 2009 Apr;28(4):881-93 PMID 19391686
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Dec 15;45(24):10485-91 PMID 22070723
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 May 5;49(9):5326-35 PMID 25851589
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Aug 15;43(16):6235-41 PMID 19746719
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Sep 15;10(9):e0138333 PMID 26371471
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2002 Dec 1;36(23):5034-40 PMID 12523417
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jul 7;49(13):7743-53 PMID 26030209
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2009 Feb;157(2):592-600 PMID 18922608
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2009 Oct 15;407(21):5578-88 PMID 19646736
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Mar 18;48(6):3153-61 PMID 24524696
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2000 Oct 9;260(1-3):213-23 PMID 11032129
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2013 May 1;452-453:196-207 PMID 23506852
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2005 Jan 15;39(2):557-68 PMID 15707056
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Jul 1;48(13):7204-6 PMID 24940613
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jun 16;49(12):7188-96 PMID 25946594
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Jun 4;47(11):5746-54 PMID 23634978
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2015 Mar 15;509-510:16-27 PMID 25604938
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Jun 1;44(11):4191-7 PMID 20443581
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Aug 21;46(16):8748-55 PMID 22839429
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Sep 10;12(9):11254-68 PMID 26378551
Cites: Mar Chem. 2015 Dec 20;177(Pt 5):753-762 PMID 26644635
Cites: Chemosphere. 2000 Jun;40(12):1335-51 PMID 10789973
Cites: Water Air Soil Pollut. 2010 Oct;212(1-4):369-385 PMID 20936165
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Jun 6;51(11):5969-5977 PMID 28448134
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2016 Sep 16;82(19):6068-78 PMID 27422835
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Jun 17;48(12):6533-43 PMID 24819278
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Sep 6;50(17 ):9262-9 PMID 27485289
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Oct 16;46(20):10957-64 PMID 23033864
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Nov 1;50(21):11559-11568 PMID 27690400
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Oct 18;50(20):10943-10950 PMID 27649379
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Jul 16;47(14):7757-65 PMID 23758558
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 May 5;49(9):5363-70 PMID 25822871
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2010 Oct;158(10):3347-53 PMID 20716469
Cites: Ambio. 2007 Feb;36(1):19-32 PMID 17408188
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2012 Mar 1;419:136-43 PMID 22281042
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2006 Aug 1;366(2-3):851-63 PMID 16181661
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Oct 7;48(19):11312-9 PMID 25171182
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Feb;115(2):235-42 PMID 17384771
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Jun 2;49(11):6712-21 PMID 25923446
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jan 3;46(1):382-90 PMID 22103560
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2014 Oct 1;494-495:337-50 PMID 25068706
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Jan 17;51(2):801-809 PMID 27951639
Cites: Ecotoxicology. 2005 Mar;14(1-2):85-99 PMID 15931960
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Mar 1;50(5):2405-12 PMID 26849121
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2012 Jan 1;414:22-42 PMID 22104383
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2011 Jan 1;409(3):548-63 PMID 21094516
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2015 Nov 1;532:220-9 PMID 26071963
Cites: Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2017 Oct 18;19(10 ):1235-1248 PMID 28825440
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Apr 15;43(8):2983-8 PMID 19475981
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Jan 19;50(2):507-24 PMID 26599393
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Aug 16;50(16):8548-57 PMID 27418119
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 May 1;45(9):3974-81 PMID 21473582
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Feb 01;14 (2): PMID 28157152
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Jan 17;51(2):863-869 PMID 27960251
Cites: J Environ Qual. 2003 Mar-Apr;32(2):393-405 PMID 12708661
Cites: Sci Adv. 2017 Jan 27;3(1):e1601239 PMID 28138547
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 May 7;47(9):4181-8 PMID 23597056
Cites: Phys Chem Chem Phys. 2017 Jan 18;19(3):1826-1838 PMID 28000816
Cites: J Mar Biol Assoc U.K.. 2016 Feb;96(1):43-59 PMID 26834292
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Sep 2;48(17):10242-50 PMID 25127072
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2007 May;388(2):353-9 PMID 17375289
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2016 Oct 15;568:651-65 PMID 26936663
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Jan 19;113(3):526-31 PMID 26729866
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2008 Oct 1;404(1):129-38 PMID 18640702
Cites: Sci Rep. 2013 Nov 25;3:3322 PMID 24270081
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2012 Dec;171:109-17 PMID 22892573
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Mar 3;49(5):3185-94 PMID 25655106
Cites: Science. 2007 Oct 19;318(5849):417-20 PMID 17872409
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Oct 15;44(20):7764-70 PMID 20853890
Cites: Nat Commun. 2014 Aug 20;5:4624 PMID 25140406
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Mar 18;48(6):3162-8 PMID 24524759
PubMed ID
29388126 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.