Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy (ACCAP)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288379
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Center for Climate Assessment & Policy (ACCAP)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Arctic Environmental Health
Ocean, Atmosphere, & Weather
Alaska
Climate change
Climate
Abstract
The mission of the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy is to assess the socioeconomic and biophysical impacts of climate variability in Alaska, make this information available to local and regional decision-makers, and improve the ability of Alaskans to adapt to a changing climate. The site has links to archived webinars.
Online Resources
Less detail

Anomalously weak Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning during the past 150 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294791
Source
Nature. 2018 04; 556(7700):227-230
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
04-2018
Author
David J R Thornalley
Delia W Oppo
Pablo Ortega
Jon I Robson
Chris M Brierley
Renee Davis
Ian R Hall
Paola Moffa-Sanchez
Neil L Rose
Peter T Spooner
Igor Yashayaev
Lloyd D Keigwin
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University College London, London, UK. d.thornalley@cantab.net.
Source
Nature. 2018 04; 556(7700):227-230
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Atlantic Ocean
Climate Change - statistics & numerical data
Convection
Fresh Water - analysis
Greenland
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
History, Medieval
Ice Cover - chemistry
Newfoundland and Labrador
Oceans and Seas
Reproducibility of Results
Seawater - analysis
Time Factors
Water Movements
Abstract
The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is a system of ocean currents that has an essential role in Earth's climate, redistributing heat and influencing the carbon cycle1, 2. The AMOC has been shown to be weakening in recent years 1 ; this decline may reflect decadal-scale variability in convection in the Labrador Sea, but short observational datasets preclude a longer-term perspective on the modern state and variability of Labrador Sea convection and the AMOC1, 3-5. Here we provide several lines of palaeo-oceanographic evidence that Labrador Sea deep convection and the AMOC have been anomalously weak over the past 150 years or so (since the end of the Little Ice Age, LIA, approximately AD 1850) compared with the preceding 1,500 years. Our palaeoclimate reconstructions indicate that the transition occurred either as a predominantly abrupt shift towards the end of the LIA, or as a more gradual, continued decline over the past 150 years; this ambiguity probably arises from non-AMOC influences on the various proxies or from the different sensitivities of these proxies to individual components of the AMOC. We suggest that enhanced freshwater fluxes from the Arctic and Nordic seas towards the end of the LIA-sourced from melting glaciers and thickened sea ice that developed earlier in the LIA-weakened Labrador Sea convection and the AMOC. The lack of a subsequent recovery may have resulted from hysteresis or from twentieth-century melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet 6 . Our results suggest that recent decadal variability in Labrador Sea convection and the AMOC has occurred during an atypical, weak background state. Future work should aim to constrain the roles of internal climate variability and early anthropogenic forcing in the AMOC weakening described here.
Notes
CommentIn: Nature. 2018 Apr;556(7700):149 PMID 29643490
CommentIn: Nature. 2018 Apr;556(7700):180-181 PMID 29636556
PubMed ID
29643484 View in PubMed
Less detail
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Columbia Law School
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
United States
Climate Change
Lawyers
Climate
Abstract
The Center for Climate Change Law (CCCL) at Columbia Law School develops legal techniques to fight climate change, trains law students and lawyers in their use, and develops databases on climate law and regulation.
Online Resources
Less detail

Center for International Climate and Environmental Research: Oslo (CICERO)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288438
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Center for International Climate and Environmental Research: Oslo (CICERO)
Language
English
Norwegian
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Arctic Environmental Health
Ocean, Atmosphere, & Weather
Climate change
Climate
Research
International Cooperation
Public Policy
Abstract
Conducts research and provide reports, information and expert advice about issues related to global climate change and international climate policy with the aim of acquiring knowledge that can help mitigate the climate problem and enhance international climate cooperation.
Online Resources
Less detail

Climate Degradation and Extreme Icing Events Constrain Life in Cold-Adapted Mammals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296102
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 01 18; 8(1):1156
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
01-18-2018
Author
J Berger
C Hartway
A Gruzdev
M Johnson
Author Affiliation
Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 80523, USA. jberger@wcs.org.
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 01 18; 8(1):1156
Date
01-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Body Size
Climate Change - mortality
Cold Climate
Disasters - history
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 21st Century
Male
Otters - physiology
Rain
Ruminants - physiology
Snow
Tsunamis - history
Whales - physiology
Abstract
Despite the growth in knowledge about the effects of a warming Arctic on its cold-adapted species, the mechanisms by which these changes affect animal populations remain poorly understood. Increasing temperatures, declining sea ice and altered wind and precipitation patterns all may affect the fitness and abundance of species through multiple direct and indirect pathways. Here we demonstrate previously unknown effects of rain-on-snow (ROS) events, winter precipitation, and ice tidal surges on the Arctic's largest land mammal. Using novel field data across seven years and three Alaskan and Russian sites, we show arrested skeletal growth in juvenile muskoxen resulting from unusually dry winter conditions and gestational ROS events, with the inhibitory effects on growth from ROS events lasting up to three years post-partum. Further, we describe the simultaneous entombment of 52 muskoxen in ice during a Chukchi Sea winter tsunami (ivuniq in Iñupiat), and link rapid freezing to entrapment of Arctic whales and otters. Our results illustrate how once unusual, but increasingly frequent Arctic weather events affect some cold-adapted mammals, and suggest that an understanding of species responses to a changing Arctic can be enhanced by coalescing groundwork, rare events, and insights from local people.
Notes
Cites: Physiol Plant. 2010 Oct;140(2):128-40 PMID 20497369
Cites: Science. 2009 Sep 11;325(5946):1355-8 PMID 19745143
Cites: Sci Rep. 2015 Mar 02;5:8676 PMID 25728642
Cites: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2014 Apr 14;369(1643):20130196 PMID 24733951
Cites: Nature. 2012 Jul 19;487(7407):358-61 PMID 22763443
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Nov 1;108(44):17905-9 PMID 22025683
Cites: Science. 2013 Jan 18;339(6117):313-5 PMID 23329044
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2012 Oct;26(5):769-77 PMID 22834930
Cites: Science. 2016 Sep 9;353(6304): PMID 27609898
Cites: Science. 2013 Aug 2;341(6145):519-24 PMID 23908231
Cites: Animal. 2009 May;3(5):657-69 PMID 22444443
Cites: Science. 2016 Jun 10;352(6291):1274-5 PMID 27284180
Cites: Biol Lett. 2016 Nov;12 (11): PMID 27852939
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2001 May 1;16(5):254-260 PMID 11301155
Cites: Ambio. 2006 Nov;35(7):347-58 PMID 17256639
Cites: Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2004 Oct;9(5):419-25 PMID 15691778
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 1998 Feb 22;265(1393):341-50 PMID 9523435
PubMed ID
29348632 View in PubMed
Less detail
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of Washington
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Data Sources
Climate Change
Climate
Interdisciplinary Studies
Northwestern United States
Abstract
CIG is an internationally recognized interdisciplinary research group studying the impacts of natural climate variability and global climate change on local communities in the western U.S. region, with most work focused on the Pacific Northwest.
Online Resources
Less detail

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC): climate change page

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288467
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Climate change
Europe
Communicable diseases
Epidemics
Abstract
Established in 2005, ECDC is an EU agency aimed at strengthening Europe's defenses against infectious diseases. It is seated in Stockholm, Sweden.
Online Resources
Less detail

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288485
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
Language
Arabic
Chinese
English
French
Russian
Spanish
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Data Sources
Climate Change
United Nations
Meteorology
Environment
Abstract
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) to provide the world with a clear scientific view on the current state of climate change and its potential environmental and socioeconomic consequences.
Online Resources
Less detail

Long-term ecological changes in marine mammals driven by recent warming in northwestern Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295322
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 01; 24(1):490-503
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
01-2018
Author
Paul Szpak
Michael Buckley
Christyann M Darwent
Michael P Richards
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Trent University, Peterborough, ON, Canada.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 01; 24(1):490-503
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Arctic Regions
Bone and Bones - chemistry - metabolism
Climate change
Collagen - chemistry - metabolism
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 21st Century
History, Medieval
Ice Cover
Nitrogen Isotopes
Seals, Earless - physiology
Abstract
Carbon and nitrogen isotopes analyses were performed on marine mammal bone collagen from three archaeological sites (ad 1170-1813) on Cape Espenberg (Kotzebue Sound, northwestern Alaska) as well as modern animals harvested from the same area to examine long-term trends in foraging ecology and sea ice productivity. We observed significant and dramatic changes in ringed seal stable isotope values between the early 19th and early 21st centuries, likely due to changing sea ice productivity and reduced delivery of organic matter to the benthos driven by recent warming in the Arctic. These data highlight the importance of the archaeological record for providing a long-term perspective on environmental variation and interpreting recent changes driven by anthropogenic processes.
PubMed ID
28850766 View in PubMed
Less detail

Rabies in Alaska, from the past to an uncertain future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298077
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1475185
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Karsten Hueffer
Molly Murphy
Author Affiliation
a Department of Veterinary Medicine , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , Alaska , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1475185
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Animals, Wild - virology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Chiroptera - virology
Climate change
Dogs - virology
Ecology
Forecasting
Foxes - virology
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Rabies - epidemiology - history
Rabies virus
Abstract
Rabies is a serious zoonotic disease with significant public health consequences in the circumpolar North. Recent studies have advanced our understanding of the disease ecology in Alaska. In this paper, we review historical records of rabies in Alaska ranging from the late nineteenth century to the present, analyse the public health impact in the state and review studies on disease ecology before assessing challenges and anticipated altered disease dynamics in the face of a rapidly changing North. Rabies is a disease that has been present in Alaska continuously for over 100 years. It is maintained in bats and foxes with the arctic fox likely playing a bigger role in maintaining the virus, although a multi-host system with both red and arctic foxes cannot be excluded. Some modelling evidence suggest a possible decrease in rabies due to a changing climate, although uncertainty is high around these predictions for rabies distribution in Alaska into the future.
PubMed ID
29764319 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.