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Climate change in Kivalina, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296263
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United State Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2011
Climate Change in Kivalina, Alaska Strategies for Community Health ANTHC Center for Climate and Health Funded by Through adaptation, negative health effects can be prevented. Cover Art: Whale Bone Mask by Larry Adams © Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC), January 2011. Advisors
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Berner, James
Bell, Jacob
Warren, John
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United State Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
7989753
Keywords
Alaska
Kivalina
Climate change
Subsistence
Health web
Sanitation
Documents

Climate-Change-HIA-Report_Kivalina.pdf

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Climate change in Point Hope, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296264
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative. 39 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2010
Climate Change in Point Hope, Alaska Strategies for Community Health ANTHC Center for Climate and Health Funded by ANTHC Advisors: Tim Gilbert MPH Jeff Smith MS Mike Bradley DVM MPH Kathy Graves PhD Steve Weaver PE Gary Ferguson ND Jennifer Johnson MPH Desirae Roehl Troy Ritter MPH Aaron
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Berner, James
Bell, Jacob
Warren, John
Rolin, Alicia
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative. 39 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6285714
Keywords
Alaska
Point Hope
Climate change
Sea level
Health web
Subsistence
Erosion
Permafrost
Water sanitation
Documents

Climate-Change-HIA-Report_Point-Hope_0.pdf

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Climate change in the Arctic: current and future vulnerability in two Inuit communities in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295945
Source
The Geographical Journal , Vol. 174 , No. 1, March 2008, pp. 45–62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
publication in July 2007 Climate change is already occurring in the Arctic and the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment recently concluded that future climate change could be devastating for Inuit. This paper characterises vulnerability to climate change in two Inuit communities in the Canadian
  1 document  
Author
Ford, James D
Smit, Barry
Wandel, Johanna
Allurut, Mishak
Shappa, Kik
Ittusarjuat, Harry
Qrunnut, Kevin
Source
The Geographical Journal , Vol. 174 , No. 1, March 2008, pp. 45–62
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
343960
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Nunavut
Subsistence
Traditional diet
Vulnerability
Participatory research
Resource management
Abstract
Climate change is already occurring in the Arctic and the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment recently concluded that future climate change could be devastating for Inuit. This paper characterises vulnerability to climate change in two Inuit communities in the Canadian territory of Nunavut, focusing on the resource harvesting sector. In both communities, Inuit have demonstrated significant adaptability in the face of current changes in climatic conditions. This adaptability is facilitated by traditional Inuit knowledge, strong social networks, flexibility in resource use, and institutional support. Changing Inuit livelihoods, however, have undermined certain aspects of adaptive capacity and have resulted in emerging vulnerabilities. Global and regional climate projections indicate that climatic conditions which currently pose risks are expected to be negatively affected by future climate change. These projections are not without precedent and analysis of current vulnerability and identification of adaptation constraints by Inuit in the two communities indicate the continued importance of traditional coping mechanisms. The ability to draw on these coping mechanisms in light of future climate change, however, will be unequal and the research indicates that young Inuit and those without access to economic resources, in particular, are vulnerable.
Documents

Climate-change-in-the-Arctic---current-and-future-vulnerability-in-two-Inuit-communities-in-Canada.pdf

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