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Adaptation in Arctic circumpolar communities: food and water security in a changing climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289270
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33820
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
James Berner
Michael Brubaker
Boris Revitch
Eva Kreummel
Moses Tcheripanoff
Jake Bell
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA; jberner@anthc.org.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33820
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Communicable diseases
Community-Based Participatory Research
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Rural Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Water supply
Abstract
The AMAP Human Health Assessment Group has developed different adaptation strategies through a long-term collaboration with all Arctic countries. Different adaptation strategies are discussed, with examples mainly from native population groups in Alaska.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27974139 View in PubMed
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Adapting to the effects of climate change on Inuit health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104452
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
James D Ford
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Susan Chatwood
Christopher Furgal
Sherilee Harper
Ian Mauro
Tristan Pearce
Author Affiliation
James D. Ford is with the Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. Ashlee Cunsolo Willox is with the Department of Community Health, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia. Susan Chatwood is with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Christopher Furgal is with the Department of Indigenous Environmental Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario. Sherilee Harper is with the Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Ontario. Ian Mauro is with the Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Tristan Pearce is with the University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydor, Queensland, Australia.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate change
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Climate change will have far-reaching implications for Inuit health. Focusing on adaptation offers a proactive approach for managing climate-related health risks-one that views Inuit populations as active agents in planning and responding at household, community, and regional levels. Adaptation can direct attention to the root causes of climate vulnerability and emphasize the importance of traditional knowledge regarding environmental change and adaptive strategies. An evidence base on adaptation options and processes for Inuit regions is currently lacking, however, thus constraining climate policy development. In this article, we tackled this deficit, drawing upon our understanding of the determinants of health vulnerability to climate change in Canada to propose key considerations for adaptation decision-making in an Inuit context.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24754615 View in PubMed
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Climate change and health effects in Northwest Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130238
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 6-10.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Climate change and health effects in Northwest Alaska Michael Brubaker*, James Berner, Raj Chavan and John Warren Center for Climate and Health, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA This article provides examples of adverse health effects, including weather-related injury
  1 document  
Author
Michael Brubaker
James Berner
Raj Chavan
John Warren
Author Affiliation
Center for Climate and Health, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA. mbrubaker@anthc.org
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 6-10.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
332455
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate Change - statistics & numerical data
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Floods
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Public Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
This article provides examples of adverse health effects, including weather-related injury, food insecurity, mental health issues, and water infrastructure damage, and the responses to these effects that are currently being applied in two Northwest Alaska communities.
In Northwest Alaska, warming is resulting in a broad range of unusual weather and environmental conditions, including delayed freeze-up, earlier breakup, storm surge, coastal erosion, and thawing permafrost. These are just some of the climate impacts that are driving concerns about weather-related injury, the spread of disease, mental health issues, infrastructure damage, and food and water security. Local leaders are challenged to identify appropriate adaptation strategies to address climate impacts and related health effects. IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: The tribal health system is combining local observations, traditional knowledge, and western science to perform community-specific climate change health impact assessments. Local leaders are applying this information to develop adaptation responses.
The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium will describe relationships between climate impacts and health effects and provide examples of community-scaled adaptation actions currently being applied in Northwest Alaska.
Climate change is increasing vulnerability to injury, disease, mental stress, food insecurity, and water insecurity. Northwest communities are applying adaptation approaches that are both specific and appropriate.
The health impact assessment process is effective in raising awareness, encouraging discussion, engaging partners, and implementing adaptation planning. With community-specific information, local leaders are applying health protective adaptation measures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22022304 View in PubMed
Documents

Brubaker-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Climate change: the next challenge for public mental health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262713
Source
Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):415-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
François Bourque
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Source
Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):415-22
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Climate change
Disasters
Droughts
Environment
Floods
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Mental health
Public Health
Weather
Abstract
Climate change is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to human health of the 21st century, with consequences that mental health professionals are also likely to face. While physical health impacts have been increasingly emphasized in literature and practice, recent scholarly literature indicates that climate change and related weather events and environmental changes can profoundly impact psychological well-being and mental health through both direct and indirect pathways, particularly among those with pre-existing vulnerabilities or those living in ecologically sensitive areas. Although knowledge is still limited about the connections between climate change and mental health, evidence is indicating that impacts may be felt at both the individual and community levels, with mental health outcomes ranging from psychological distress, depression and anxiety, to increased addictions and suicide rates. Drawing on examples from diverse geographical areas, this article highlights some climate-sensitive impacts that may be encountered by mental health professionals. We then suggest potential avenues for public mental health in light of current and projected changes, in order to stimulate thought, debate, and action.
PubMed ID
25137107 View in PubMed
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Community-based research as a mechanism to reduce environmental health disparities in american Indian and alaska native communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272066
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Apr;12(4):4076-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Cynthia Agumanu McOliver
Anne K Camper
John T Doyle
Margaret J Eggers
Tim E Ford
Mary Ann Lila
James Berner
Larry Campbell
Jamie Donatuto
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Apr;12(4):4076-100
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Community-Based Participatory Research
Environmental health
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Minority Groups
Quality of Life
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Abstract
Racial and ethnic minority communities, including American Indian and Alaska Natives, have been disproportionately impacted by environmental pollution and contamination. This includes siting and location of point sources of pollution, legacies of contamination of drinking and recreational water, and mining, military and agricultural impacts. As a result, both quantity and quality of culturally important subsistence resources are diminished, contributing to poor nutrition and obesity, and overall reductions in quality of life and life expectancy. Climate change is adding to these impacts on Native American communities, variably causing drought, increased flooding and forced relocation affecting tribal water resources, traditional foods, forests and forest resources, and tribal health. This article will highlight several extramural research projects supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science to Achieve Results (STAR) tribal environmental research grants as a mechanism to address the environmental health inequities and disparities faced by tribal communities. The tribal research portfolio has focused on addressing tribal environmental health risks through community based participatory research. Specifically, the STAR research program was developed under the premise that tribal populations may be at an increased risk for environmentally-induced diseases as a result of unique subsistence and traditional practices of the tribes and Alaska Native villages, community activities, occupations and customs, and/or environmental releases that significantly and disproportionately impact tribal lands. Through a series of case studies, this article will demonstrate how grantees-tribal community leaders and members and academic collaborators-have been addressing these complex environmental concerns by developing capacity, expertise and tools through community-engaged research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25872019 View in PubMed
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"From this place and of this place:" climate change, sense of place, and health in Nunatsiavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124293
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Sherilee L Harper
James D Ford
Karen Landman
Karen Houle
Victoria L Edge
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Design & Rural Development, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1. ashlee@uoguelph.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Climate change
Emotions
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Health - ethnology
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Nunavut - epidemiology
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
As climate change impacts are felt around the globe, people are increasingly exposed to changes in weather patterns, wildlife and vegetation, and water and food quality, access and availability in their local regions. These changes can impact human health and well-being in a variety of ways: increased risk of foodborne and waterborne diseases; increased frequency and distribution of vector-borne disease; increased mortality and injury due to extreme weather events and heat waves; increased respiratory and cardiovascular disease due to changes in air quality and increased allergens in the air; and increased susceptibility to mental and emotional health challenges. While climate change is a global phenomenon, the impacts are experienced most acutely in place; as such, a sense of place, place-attachment, and place-based identities are important indicators for climate-related health and adaptation. Representing one of the first qualitative case studies to examine the connections among climate change, a changing sense of place, and health in an Inuit context, this research draws data from a multi-year community-driven case study situated in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, Canada. Data informing this paper were drawn from the narrative analysis of 72 in-depth interviews conducted from November 2009 to October 2010, as well as from the descriptive analysis of 112 questionnaires from a survey in October 2010 (95% response rate). The findings illustrated that climate change is negatively affecting feelings of place attachment by disrupting hunting, fishing, foraging, trapping, and traveling, and changing local landscapes-changes which subsequently impact physical, mental, and emotional health and well-being. These results also highlight the need to develop context-specific climate-health planning and adaptation programs, and call for an understanding of place-attachment as a vital indicator of health and well-being and for climate change to be framed as an important determinant of health.
PubMed ID
22595069 View in PubMed
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Zoonotic infections in Alaska: disease prevalence, potential impact of climate change and recommended actions for earlier disease detection, research, prevention and control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116415
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Karsten Hueffer
Alan J Parkinson
Robert Gerlach
James Berner
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Wildlife, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Brucellosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Climate change
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Communication
Echinococcosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health education
Humans
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Public Health Administration
Rabies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sentinel Surveillance
Toxoplasmosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Tularemia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Zoonoses - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
Over the last 60 years, Alaska's mean annual temperature has increased by 1.6°C, more than twice the rate of the rest of the United States. As a result, climate change impacts are more pronounced here than in other regions of the United States. Warmer temperatures may allow some infected host animals to survive winters in larger numbers, increase their population and expand their range of habitation thus increasing the opportunity for transmission of infection to humans. Subsistence hunting and gathering activities may place rural residents of Alaska at a greater risk of acquiring zoonotic infections than urban residents. Known zoonotic diseases that occur in Alaska include brucellosis, toxoplasmosis, trichinellosis, giardiasis/cryptosporidiosis, echinococcosis, rabies and tularemia. Actions for early disease detection, research and prevention and control include: (1) determining baseline levels of infection and disease in both humans and host animals; (2) conducting more research to understand the ecology of infection in the Arctic environment; (3) improving active and passive surveillance systems for infection and disease in humans and animals; (4) improving outreach, education and communication on climate-sensitive infectious diseases at the community, health and animal care provider levels; and (5) improving coordination between public health and animal health agencies, universities and tribal health organisations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23399790 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.