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Climate change in Kivalina, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296263
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United State Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2011
Climate Change in Kivalina, Alaska Strategies for Community Health ANTHC Center for Climate and Health Funded by Through adaptation, negative health effects can be prevented. Cover Art: Whale Bone Mask by Larry Adams © Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC), January 2011. Advisors
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Berner, James
Bell, Jacob
Warren, John
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United State Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
7989753
Keywords
Alaska
Kivalina
Climate change
Subsistence
Health web
Sanitation
Documents

Climate-Change-HIA-Report_Kivalina.pdf

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Climate change in Noatak, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296268
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2011
Climate Change in Noatak, Alaska Strategies for Community Health ANTHC Center for Climate and Health Funded by © Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC), June 2011. Funded by United States Indian Health Service Cooperative Agreement No. AN 08-X59 Through adaptation, negative health
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Bell, Jake
Berner, James
Black, Mike
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
8593504
Keywords
Alaska
Noatak
Climate change
Water sanitation
Subsistence
Erosion
Permafrost
Food security
Documents

CCH_AR_062011_Climate-Change-in-Noatak.pdf

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Climate change in Point Hope, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296264
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative. 39 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2010
Climate Change in Point Hope, Alaska Strategies for Community Health ANTHC Center for Climate and Health Funded by ANTHC Advisors: Tim Gilbert MPH Jeff Smith MS Mike Bradley DVM MPH Kathy Graves PhD Steve Weaver PE Gary Ferguson ND Jennifer Johnson MPH Desirae Roehl Troy Ritter MPH Aaron
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Berner, James
Bell, Jacob
Warren, John
Rolin, Alicia
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative. 39 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6285714
Keywords
Alaska
Point Hope
Climate change
Sea level
Health web
Subsistence
Erosion
Permafrost
Water sanitation
Documents

Climate-Change-HIA-Report_Point-Hope_0.pdf

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Climate change in Selawik, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296266
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC). 42 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2012
Climate Change in Selawik, Alaska Strategies for Community Health ANTHC Center for Climate and Health Funded by jobradley Stamp © Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC), May 2012. Through adaptation, negative health effects can be prevented. Report prepared by: Michael Brubaker
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Chavan, Prithviraj
Berner, James
Black, Mike
Warren, John
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC). 42 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
9077605
Keywords
Alaska
Selawik
Climate change
Water sanitation
Health web
Food security
Permafrost
Erosion
Documents

Climate-Change-in-Selawik-Alaska.pdf

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Living in an oasis: Rapid transformations, resilience, and resistance in the North Water Area societies and ecosystems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295699
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):296-309
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Erik Jeppesen
Martin Appelt
Kirsten Hastrup
Bjarne Grønnow
Anders Mosbech
John P Smol
Thomas A Davidson
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Vejlsøvej 25, 8600, Silkeborg, Denmark. ej@bios.au.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):296-309
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Ecosystem
Fresh Water
Human Activities
Humans
Abstract
Based on lake sediment data, archaeological findings, and historical records, we describe rapid transformations, resilience and resistance in societies and ecosystems, and their interactions in the past in the North Water area related to changes in climate and historical events. Examples are the formation of the polynya itself and the early arrival of people, ca. 4500 years ago, and later major human immigrations (different societies, cultural encounters, or abandonment) from other regions in the Arctic. While the early immigrations had relatively modest and localised effect on the ecosystem, the later-incoming culture in the early thirteenth century was marked by extensive migrations into and out of the area and abrupt shifts in hunting technologies. This has had long-lasting consequences for the local lake ecosystems. Large natural transformations in the ecosystems have also occurred over relatively short time periods related to changes in the polynya. Finally, we discuss the future perspectives for the North Water area given the many threats, but also opportunities.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1255832 PMID 25170159
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):175-192 PMID 29516438
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2017 Feb 22;284(1849): PMID 28202811
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Cites: Hum Nat. 2012 Dec;23(4):419-46 PMID 23054998
PubMed ID
29520749 View in PubMed
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Trends in historical mercury deposition inferred from lake sediment cores across a climate gradient in the Canadian High Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294973
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Oct; 241:459-467
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Jennifer B Korosi
Katherine Griffiths
John P Smol
Jules M Blais
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, K1N 6N5, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: jkorosi@yorku.ca.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Oct; 241:459-467
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate change
Diatoms
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Ice Cover
Lakes
Mercury - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Pollution, Chemical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Recent climate change may be enhancing mercury fluxes to Arctic lake sediments, confounding the use of sediment cores to reconstruct histories of atmospheric deposition. Assessing the independent effects of climate warming on mercury sequestration is challenging due to temporal overlap between warming temperatures and increased long-range transport of atmospheric mercury following the Industrial Revolution. We address this challenge by examining mercury trends in short cores (the last several hundred years) from eight lakes centered on Cape Herschel (Canadian High Arctic) that span a gradient in microclimates, including two lakes that have not yet been significantly altered by climate warming due to continued ice cover. Previous research on subfossil diatoms and inferred primary production indicated the timing of limnological responses to climate warming, which, due to prevailing ice cover conditions, varied from ~1850 to ~1990 for lakes that have undergone changes. We show that climate warming may have enhanced mercury deposition to lake sediments in one lake (Moraine Pond), while another (West Lake) showed a strong signal of post-industrial mercury enrichment without any corresponding limnological changes associated with warming. Our results provide insights into the role of climate warming and organic carbon cycling as drivers of mercury deposition to Arctic lake sediments.
PubMed ID
29870948 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.