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Climate change in Kivalina, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296263
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United State Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2011
Climate Change in Kivalina, Alaska Strategies for Community Health ANTHC Center for Climate and Health Funded by Through adaptation, negative health effects can be prevented. Cover Art: Whale Bone Mask by Larry Adams © Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC), January 2011. Advisors
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Berner, James
Bell, Jacob
Warren, John
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United State Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
7989753
Keywords
Alaska
Kivalina
Climate change
Subsistence
Health web
Sanitation
Documents

Climate-Change-HIA-Report_Kivalina.pdf

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Climate change in Noatak, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296268
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2011
Climate Change in Noatak, Alaska Strategies for Community Health ANTHC Center for Climate and Health Funded by © Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC), June 2011. Funded by United States Indian Health Service Cooperative Agreement No. AN 08-X59 Through adaptation, negative health
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Bell, Jake
Berner, James
Black, Mike
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
8593504
Keywords
Alaska
Noatak
Climate change
Water sanitation
Subsistence
Erosion
Permafrost
Food security
Documents

CCH_AR_062011_Climate-Change-in-Noatak.pdf

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Climate change in Point Hope, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296264
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative. 39 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2010
Climate Change in Point Hope, Alaska Strategies for Community Health ANTHC Center for Climate and Health Funded by ANTHC Advisors: Tim Gilbert MPH Jeff Smith MS Mike Bradley DVM MPH Kathy Graves PhD Steve Weaver PE Gary Ferguson ND Jennifer Johnson MPH Desirae Roehl Troy Ritter MPH Aaron
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Berner, James
Bell, Jacob
Warren, John
Rolin, Alicia
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and United States Indian Health Service Cooperative. 39 p.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6285714
Keywords
Alaska
Point Hope
Climate change
Sea level
Health web
Subsistence
Erosion
Permafrost
Water sanitation
Documents

Climate-Change-HIA-Report_Point-Hope_0.pdf

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Climate change in Selawik, Alaska: strategies for community health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296266
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC). 42 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2012
Climate Change in Selawik, Alaska Strategies for Community Health ANTHC Center for Climate and Health Funded by jobradley Stamp © Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC), May 2012. Through adaptation, negative health effects can be prevented. Report prepared by: Michael Brubaker
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Chavan, Prithviraj
Berner, James
Black, Mike
Warren, John
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC). 42 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
9077605
Keywords
Alaska
Selawik
Climate change
Water sanitation
Health web
Food security
Permafrost
Erosion
Documents

Climate-Change-in-Selawik-Alaska.pdf

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Climate change threatens polar bear populations: a stochastic demographic analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100110
Source
Ecology. 2010 Oct;91(10):2883-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Christine M Hunter
Hal Caswell
Michael C Runge
Eric V Regehr
Steve C Amstrup
Ian Stirling
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Wildlife, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775, USA. christine.hunter@alaska.edu
Source
Ecology. 2010 Oct;91(10):2883-97
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate change
Ecosystem
Endangered Species
Models, Biological
Population Dynamics
Stochastic Processes
Time Factors
Uncertainty
United States
Ursidae - physiology
Abstract
The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice for feeding, breeding, and movement. Significant reductions in Arctic sea ice are forecast to continue because of climate warming. We evaluated the impacts of climate change on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea by means of a demographic analysis, combining deterministic, stochastic, environment-dependent matrix population models with forecasts of future sea ice conditions from IPCC general circulation models (GCMs). The matrix population models classified individuals by age and breeding status; mothers and dependent cubs were treated as units. Parameter estimates were obtained from a capture-recapture study conducted from 2001 to 2006. Candidate statistical models allowed vital rates to vary with time and as functions of a sea ice covariate. Model averaging was used to produce the vital rate estimates, and a parametric bootstrap procedure was used to quantify model selection and parameter estimation uncertainty. Deterministic models projected population growth in years with more extensive ice coverage (2001-2003) and population decline in years with less ice coverage (2004-2005). LTRE (life table response experiment) analysis showed that the reduction in lambda in years with low sea ice was due primarily to reduced adult female survival, and secondarily to reduced breeding. A stochastic model with two environmental states, good and poor sea ice conditions, projected a declining stochastic growth rate, log lambdas, as the frequency of poor ice years increased. The observed frequency of poor ice years since 1979 would imply log lambdas approximately - 0.01, which agrees with available (albeit crude) observations of population size. The stochastic model was linked to a set of 10 GCMs compiled by the IPCC; the models were chosen for their ability to reproduce historical observations of sea ice and were forced with "business as usual" (A1B) greenhouse gas emissions. The resulting stochastic population projections showed drastic declines in the polar bear population by the end of the 21st century. These projections were instrumental in the decision to list the polar bear as a threatened species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.
PubMed ID
21058549 View in PubMed
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Ecological consequences of sea-ice decline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108298
Source
Science. 2013 Aug 2;341(6145):519-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2-2013
Author
Eric Post
Uma S Bhatt
Cecilia M Bitz
Jedediah F Brodie
Tara L Fulton
Mark Hebblewhite
Jeffrey Kerby
Susan J Kutz
Ian Stirling
Donald A Walker
Author Affiliation
The Polar Center, and Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. esp10@psu.edu
Source
Science. 2013 Aug 2;341(6145):519-24
Date
Aug-2-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquatic Organisms
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Humans
Ice Cover
Invertebrates
Plant Development
Seawater
Vertebrates
Abstract
After a decade with nine of the lowest arctic sea-ice minima on record, including the historically low minimum in 2012, we synthesize recent developments in the study of ecological responses to sea-ice decline. Sea-ice loss emerges as an important driver of marine and terrestrial ecological dynamics, influencing productivity, species interactions, population mixing, gene flow, and pathogen and disease transmission. Major challenges in the near future include assigning clearer attribution to sea ice as a primary driver of such dynamics, especially in terrestrial systems, and addressing pressures arising from human use of arctic coastal and near-shore areas as sea ice diminishes.
PubMed ID
23908231 View in PubMed
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Spring fasting behavior in a marine apex predator provides an index of ecosystem productivity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295310
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 01; 24(1):410-423
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
01-2018
Author
Karyn D Rode
Ryan R Wilson
David C Douglas
Vanessa Muhlenbruch
Todd C Atwood
Eric V Regehr
Evan S Richardson
Nicholas W Pilfold
Andrew E Derocher
George M Durner
Ian Stirling
Steven C Amstrup
Michelle St Martin
Anthony M Pagano
Kristin Simac
Author Affiliation
U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Science Center, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 01; 24(1):410-423
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Caniformia
Climate change
Diet
Food chain
Ice Cover
Population Dynamics
Reproduction
Seasons
Ursidae - blood
Abstract
The effects of declining Arctic sea ice on local ecosystem productivity are not well understood but have been shown to vary inter-specifically, spatially, and temporally. Because marine mammals occupy upper trophic levels in Arctic food webs, they may be useful indicators for understanding variation in ecosystem productivity. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are apex predators that primarily consume benthic and pelagic-feeding ice-associated seals. As such, their productivity integrates sea ice conditions and the ecosystem supporting them. Declining sea ice availability has been linked to negative population effects for polar bears but does not fully explain observed population changes. We examined relationships between spring foraging success of polar bears and sea ice conditions, prey productivity, and general patterns of ecosystem productivity in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas (CSs). Fasting status (=7 days) was estimated using serum urea and creatinine levels of 1,448 samples collected from 1,177 adult and subadult bears across three subpopulations. Fasting increased in the Beaufort Sea between 1983-1999 and 2000-2016 and was related to an index of ringed seal body condition. This change was concurrent with declines in body condition of polar bears and observed changes in the diet, condition and/or reproduction of four other vertebrate consumers within the food chain. In contrast, fasting declined in CS polar bears between periods and was less common than in the two Beaufort Sea subpopulations consistent with studies demonstrating higher primary productivity and maintenance or improved body condition in polar bears, ringed seals, and bearded seals despite recent sea ice loss in this region. Consistency between regional and temporal variation in spring polar bear fasting and food web productivity suggests that polar bears may be a useful indicator species. Furthermore, our results suggest that spatial and temporal ecological variation is important in affecting upper trophic-level productivity in these marine ecosystems.
PubMed ID
28994242 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.