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Effects of high latitude protected areas on bird communities under rapid climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286555
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Jun;23(6):2241-2249
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Andrea Santangeli
Ari Rajasärkkä
Aleksi Lehikoinen
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Jun;23(6):2241-2249
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biodiversity
Birds
Climate
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Finland
Humans
Abstract
Anthropogenic climate change is rapidly becoming one of the main threats to biodiversity, along with other threats triggered by human-driven land-use change. Species are already responding to climate change by shifting their distributions polewards. This shift may create a spatial mismatch between dynamic species distributions and static protected areas (PAs). As protected areas represent one of the main pillars for preserving biodiversity today and in the future, it is important to assess their contribution in sheltering the biodiversity communities, they were designated to protect. A recent development to investigate climate-driven impacts on biological communities is represented by the community temperature index (CTI). CTI provides a measure of the relative temperature average of a community in a specific assemblage. CTI value will be higher for assemblages dominated by warm species compared with those dominated by cold-dwelling species. We here model changes in the CTI of Finnish bird assemblages, as well as changes in species densities, within and outside of PAs during the past four decades in a large boreal landscape under rapid change. We show that CTI has markedly increased over time across Finland, with this change being similar within and outside PAs and five to seven times slower than the temperature increase. Moreover, CTI has been constantly lower within than outside of PAs, and PAs still support communities, which show colder thermal index than those outside of PAs in the 1970s and 1980s. This result can be explained by the higher relative density of northern species within PAs than outside. Overall, our results provide some, albeit inconclusive, evidence that PAs may play a role in supporting the community of northern species. Results also suggest that communities are, however, shifting rapidly, both inside and outside of PAs, highlighting the need for adjusting conservation measures before it is too late.
PubMed ID
27685981 View in PubMed
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Interannual variation and long-term trends in proportions of resident individuals in partially migratory birds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278423
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2016 Mar;85(2):570-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Kalle Meller
Anssi V Vähätalo
Tatu Hokkanen
Jukka Rintala
Markus Piha
Aleksi Lehikoinen
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2016 Mar;85(2):570-80
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Birds - physiology
Climate change
Finland
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Abstract
Partial migration - a part of a population migrates and another part stays resident year-round on the breeding site - is probably the most common type of migration in the animal kingdom, yet it has only lately garnered more attention. Theoretical studies indicate that in partially migratory populations, the proportion of resident individuals (PoR) should increase in high latitudes in response to the warming climate, but empirical evidence exists for few species. We provide the first comprehensive overview of the environmental factors affecting PoR and the long-term trends in PoR by studying 27 common partially migratory bird species in Finland. The annual PoR values were calculated by dividing the winter bird abundance by the preceding breeding abundance. First, we analysed whether early-winter temperature, winter temperature year before or the abundance of tree seeds just before overwintering explains the interannual variation in PoR. Secondly, we analysed the trends in PoR between 1987 and 2011. Early-winter temperature explained the interannual variation in PoR in the waterbirds (waterfowl and gulls), most likely because the temperature affects the ice conditions and thereby the feeding opportunities for the waterbirds. In terrestrial species, the abundance of seeds was the best explanatory variable. Previous winter's temperature did not explain PoR in any species, and thus, we conclude that the variation in food availability caused the interannual variation in PoR. During the study period, PoR increased in waterbirds, but did not change in terrestrial birds. Partially migratory species living in physically contrasting habitats can differ in their annual and long-term population-level behavioural responses to warming climate, possibly because warm winter temperatures reduce ice cover and improve the feeding possibilities of waterbirds but do not directly regulate the food availability for terrestrial birds.
PubMed ID
26718017 View in PubMed
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North by north-west: climate change and directions of density shifts in birds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277441
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2016 Mar;22(3):1121-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Aleksi Lehikoinen
Raimo Virkkala
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2016 Mar;22(3):1121-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Migration
Animals
Birds - physiology
Climate change
Ecosystem
Finland
Population Density
Abstract
There is increasing evidence that climate change shifts species distributions towards poles and mountain tops. However, most studies are based on presence-absence data, and either abundance or the observation effort has rarely been measured. In addition, hardly any studies have investigated the direction of shifts and factors affecting them. Here, we show using count data on a 1000 km south-north gradient in Finland, that between 1970-1989 and 2000-2012, 128 bird species shifted their densities, on average, 37 km towards the north north-east. The species-specific directions of the shifts in density were significantly explained by migration behaviour and habitat type. Although the temperatures have also moved on average towards the north north-east (186 km), the species-specific directions of the shifts in density and temperature did not correlate due to high variation in density shifts. Findings highlight that climate change is unlikely the only driver of the direction of species density shifts, but species-specific characteristics and human land-use practices are also influencing the direction. Furthermore, the alarming results show that former climatic conditions in the north-west corner of Finland have already moved out of the country. This highlights the need for an international approach in research and conservation actions to mitigate the impacts of climate change.
PubMed ID
26691578 View in PubMed
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Patterns of climate-induced density shifts of species: poleward shifts faster in northern boreal birds than in southern birds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263033
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Oct;20(10):2995-3003
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Raimo Virkkala
Aleksi Lehikoinen
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Oct;20(10):2995-3003
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Biodiversity
Birds
Climate change
Finland
Population Density
Abstract
Climate change has been shown to cause poleward range shifts of species. These shifts are typically demonstrated using presence-absence data, which can mask the potential changes in the abundance of species. Moreover, changes in the mean centre of weighted density of species are seldom examined, and comparisons between these two methods are even rarer. Here, we studied the change in the mean weighted latitude of density (MWLD) of 94 bird species in Finland, northern Europe, using data covering a north-south gradient of over 1000 km from the 1970s to the 2010s. The MWLD shifted northward on average 1.26 km yr(-1) , and this shift was significantly stronger in northern species compared to southern species. These shifts can be related to climate warming during the study period, because the annual temperature had increased more in northern Finland (by 1.7 °C) than in southern Finland (by 1.4 °C), although direct causal links cannot be shown. Density shifts of species distributed over the whole country did not differ from shifts in species situated on the edge of the species range in southern and northern species. This means that density shifts occur both in the core and on the edge of species distribution. The species-specific comparison of MWLD values with corresponding changes in the mean weighted latitude using presence-absence atlas data (MWL) revealed that the MWLD moved more slowly than the MWL in the atlas data in the southern species examined, but more rapidly in the northern species. Our findings highlight that population densities are also moving rapidly towards the poles and the use of presence-absence data can mask the shift of population densities. We encourage use of abundance data in studies considering the effects of climate change on biodiversity.
PubMed ID
24729475 View in PubMed
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Velocity of density shifts in Finnish landbird species depends on their migration ecology and body mass.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279421
Source
Oecologia. 2016 May;181(1):313-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Kaisa Välimäki
Andreas Lindén
Aleksi Lehikoinen
Source
Oecologia. 2016 May;181(1):313-21
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Birds - physiology
Body Weight
Climate change
Finland
Population Density
Abstract
A multitude of studies confirm that species have changed their distribution ranges towards higher elevations and towards the poles, as has been predicted by climate change forecasts. However, there is large interspecific variation in the velocity of range shifts. From a conservation perspective, it is important to understand which factors explain variation in the speed and the extent of range shifts, as these might be related to the species' extinction risk. Here, we study shifts in the mean latitude of occurrence, as weighted by population density, in different groups of landbirds using 40 years of line transect data from Finland. Our results show that the velocity of such density shifts differed among migration strategies and increased with decreasing body size of species, while breeding habitat had no influence. The slower velocity of large species could be related to their longer generation time and lower per capita reproduction that can decrease the dispersal ability compared to smaller species. In contrast to some earlier studies of range margin shifts, resident birds and partial migrants showed faster range shifts, while fully migratory species were moving more slowly. The results suggest that migratory species, especially long-distance migrants, which often show decreasing population trends, might also have problems in adjusting their distribution ranges to keep pace with global warming.
PubMed ID
26815364 View in PubMed
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