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Climate change and zoonotic infections in the Russian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121895
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18792
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
  1 website  
Author
Boris Revich
Nikolai Tokarevich
Alan J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forecasting, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. revich@ecfor.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18792
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Climate change
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Zoonoses - epidemiology
Abstract
Climate change in the Russian Arctic is more pronounced than in any other part of the country. Between 1955 and 2000, the annual average air temperature in the Russian North increased by 1.2°C. During the same period, the mean temperature of upper layer of permafrost increased by 3°C. Climate change in Russian Arctic increases the risks of the emergence of zoonotic infectious diseases. This review presents data on morbidity rates among people, domestic animals and wildlife in the Russian Arctic, focusing on the potential climate related emergence of such diseases as tick-borne encephalitis, tularemia, brucellosis, leptospirosis, rabies, and anthrax.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22868189 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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The international polar year: continuing the arctic human health legacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128322
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):447-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011

Sustainable development, climate change and human health in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97991
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Feb;69(1):99-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Alan J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Arctic Investigations Program, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. ajp1@CDC.GOV
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Feb;69(1):99-105
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Environmental pollution
Health status
Humans
Population Groups
PubMed ID
20167160 View in PubMed
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Zoonotic infections in Alaska: disease prevalence, potential impact of climate change and recommended actions for earlier disease detection, research, prevention and control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116415
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Karsten Hueffer
Alan J Parkinson
Robert Gerlach
James Berner
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Wildlife, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Brucellosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Climate change
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Communication
Echinococcosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health education
Humans
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Public Health Administration
Rabies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sentinel Surveillance
Toxoplasmosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Tularemia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Zoonoses - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
Over the last 60 years, Alaska's mean annual temperature has increased by 1.6°C, more than twice the rate of the rest of the United States. As a result, climate change impacts are more pronounced here than in other regions of the United States. Warmer temperatures may allow some infected host animals to survive winters in larger numbers, increase their population and expand their range of habitation thus increasing the opportunity for transmission of infection to humans. Subsistence hunting and gathering activities may place rural residents of Alaska at a greater risk of acquiring zoonotic infections than urban residents. Known zoonotic diseases that occur in Alaska include brucellosis, toxoplasmosis, trichinellosis, giardiasis/cryptosporidiosis, echinococcosis, rabies and tularemia. Actions for early disease detection, research and prevention and control include: (1) determining baseline levels of infection and disease in both humans and host animals; (2) conducting more research to understand the ecology of infection in the Arctic environment; (3) improving active and passive surveillance systems for infection and disease in humans and animals; (4) improving outreach, education and communication on climate-sensitive infectious diseases at the community, health and animal care provider levels; and (5) improving coordination between public health and animal health agencies, universities and tribal health organisations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23399790 View in PubMed
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