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Source
Office of Naval Research, Naval Research Laboratory, Hunter College
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1999
Author
Crane, K
Galasso, JL
Author Affiliation
Office of Naval Research, Naval Research Laboratory, Hunter College
Source
Office of Naval Research, Naval Research Laboratory, Hunter College
Date
1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Acidification
Arctic haze
Atmospheric transport
Biota
Cesium-137
Climate change
Heavy metals
Marine-life contamination pathways
Oceanic transport
Ozone depletion
Plutonium-239
Plutonium-240
Radionuclides
Riverine transport
Strontium-90
Terrestrial-life contamination pathways
Transport pathways
Abstract
This atlas of environmental information is intended to display graphically and make available to a wide audience the data and references to data compiled as a result of the Arctic Nuclear Waste Assessment Program (ANWAP).
Notes
Available at UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: Oversize TD196.R3 C7 1999
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Arctic pollution issues: A state of the Arctic environment report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99515
Date
1997
  1 document     1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP)
Date
1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Acidification
Arctic haze
Arctic residents
Climate change
Contaminant pathways
Contamination levels, trends, and effects
Geographical areas of concern
Heavy metals
Human exposure
Human health
Indigenous peoples
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Petroleum hydrocarbons
Polar ecology
Pollution
Potential threats
Radioactivity
Abstract
The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), established in 1991 under the Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy (AEPS), was given the responsibility to monitor the levels and assess the effects of selected anthropogenic pollutants in all compartments of the Arctic. This is the first AMAP assessment report, and it represents a collaborative effort involving over 400scientists and administrators. It is based on AMAP-coordinatednational and international monitoring programs within the eight Arctic countries, in combination with data and information from several research programs, including contributions from non-Arctic countries and international organizations.
Notes
Print copy available in UAA/APU Alaskana collection: QH545.A1 A72 1997. Print copy also available in ARLIS general collection: QH84.1.A73 1997
Also available to download from AMAP
Online Resources
Documents

ArcticPollutionIssues.pdf

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Climate change, ozone, and ultraviolet radiation

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100839
Source
Chapter 11 (pp. 717-774) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
Source
Chapter 11 (pp. 717-774) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic peoples
Arctic stratospheric ozone
Biosphere
Climate change
Effects
International efforts
UV radiation
Abstract
Global climate change is a growing concern, especially in Arctic regions where increases in temperature from anthropogenic influences could be considerably higher than the global average. Climatic changes are not new to the Arctic or its peoples. Indigenous peoples of the far north have adapted to the austere climate; different groups have found their own unique ways to harvest food and provide clothing, tools, and shelter. At times the climate has warmed or cooled relatively suddenly and people have either adapted, moved, or died off. The paleo-archaeological record, indigenous peoples? oral history, and historical documents provide evidence of climatic changes for thousands of years. Today, people of the Arctic, whether they continue to live close to the land or live in urban centers, must again confront rapid changes in climate. Various records over the last 40 years confirm that the rate of global warming has been greatest over Eurasia and North America between 40°N and 70°N (IPCC 1996a). Arctic research substantiates these observations through direct and indirect indicators of climate change. Sea ice, snow cover, glaciers, tundra, permafrost, boreal forests, and peatlands are all responsive to subtle variations in sunlight, surface temperature, ocean heat transport, air and ocean chemistry, and aerosols in the atmosphere. Compared with the rest of the globe, the Arctic climate is very sensitive to change because of a complex series of interactions and positive feedback processes among the region?s oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns, temperature regime, hydrologic cycle, and sea ice formation (Barry et al. 1993a, Kellogg 1983, Mysak 1995).
Notes
Book available in UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: TD190.5.A75 1998; and in ARLIS General Collection: TD190.5A46 1998
Online Resources
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