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Nurses' perceptions of climate and environmental issues: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272072
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2015 Aug;71(8):1883-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Anna Anåker
Maria Nilsson
Åsa Holmner
Marie Elf
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2015 Aug;71(8):1883-91
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate change
Humans
Nursing Staff - psychology
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore nurses' perceptions of climate and environmental issues and examine how nurses perceive their role in contributing to the process of sustainable development.
Climate change and its implications for human health represent an increasingly important issue for the healthcare sector. According to the International Council of Nurses Code of Ethics, nurses have a responsibility to be involved and support climate change mitigation and adaptation to protect human health.
This is a descriptive, explorative qualitative study.
Nurses (n = 18) were recruited from hospitals, primary care and emergency medical services; eight participated in semi-structured, in-depth individual interviews and 10 participated in two focus groups. Data were collected from April-October 2013 in Sweden; interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.
Two main themes were identified from the interviews: (i) an incongruence between climate and environmental issues and nurses' daily work; and (ii) public health work is regarded as a health co-benefit of climate change mitigation. While being green is not the primary task in a lifesaving, hectic and economically challenging context, nurses' perceived their profession as entailing responsibility, opportunities and a sense of individual commitment to influence the environment in a positive direction.
This study argues there is a need for increased awareness of issues and methods that are crucial for the healthcare sector to respond to climate change. Efforts to develop interventions should explore how nurses should be able to contribute to the healthcare sector's preparedness for and contributions to sustainable development.
PubMed ID
25810044 View in PubMed
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Ecological consequences of sea-ice decline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108298
Source
Science. 2013 Aug 2;341(6145):519-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2-2013
Author
Eric Post
Uma S Bhatt
Cecilia M Bitz
Jedediah F Brodie
Tara L Fulton
Mark Hebblewhite
Jeffrey Kerby
Susan J Kutz
Ian Stirling
Donald A Walker
Author Affiliation
The Polar Center, and Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. esp10@psu.edu
Source
Science. 2013 Aug 2;341(6145):519-24
Date
Aug-2-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquatic Organisms
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Humans
Ice Cover
Invertebrates
Plant Development
Seawater
Vertebrates
Abstract
After a decade with nine of the lowest arctic sea-ice minima on record, including the historically low minimum in 2012, we synthesize recent developments in the study of ecological responses to sea-ice decline. Sea-ice loss emerges as an important driver of marine and terrestrial ecological dynamics, influencing productivity, species interactions, population mixing, gene flow, and pathogen and disease transmission. Major challenges in the near future include assigning clearer attribution to sea ice as a primary driver of such dynamics, especially in terrestrial systems, and addressing pressures arising from human use of arctic coastal and near-shore areas as sea ice diminishes.
PubMed ID
23908231 View in PubMed
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Cumulative geoecological effects of 62 years of infrastructure and climate change in ice-rich permafrost landscapes, Prudhoe Bay Oilfield, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262859
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Apr;20(4):1211-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Martha K Raynolds
Donald A Walker
Kenneth J Ambrosius
Jerry Brown
Kaye R Everett
Mikhail Kanevskiy
Gary P Kofinas
Vladimir E Romanovsky
Yuri Shur
Patrick J Webber
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Apr;20(4):1211-24
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Ice
Oil and Gas Fields
Soil
Temperature
Abstract
Many areas of the Arctic are simultaneously affected by rapid climate change and rapid industrial development. These areas are likely to increase in number and size as sea ice melts and abundant Arctic natural resources become more accessible. Documenting the changes that have already occurred is essential to inform management approaches to minimize the impacts of future activities. Here, we determine the cumulative geoecological effects of 62?years (1949-2011) of infrastructure- and climate-related changes in the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield, the oldest and most extensive industrial complex in the Arctic, and an area with extensive ice-rich permafrost that is extraordinarily sensitive to climate change. We demonstrate that thermokarst has recently affected broad areas of the entire region, and that a sudden increase in the area affected began shortly after 1990 corresponding to a rapid rise in regional summer air temperatures and related permafrost temperatures. We also present a conceptual model that describes how infrastructure-related factors, including road dust and roadside flooding are contributing to more extensive thermokarst in areas adjacent to roads and gravel pads. We mapped the historical infrastructure changes for the Alaska North Slope oilfields for 10 dates from the initial oil discovery in 1968-2011. By 2010, over 34% of the intensively mapped area was affected by oil development. In addition, between 1990 and 2001, coincident with strong atmospheric warming during the 1990s, 19% of the remaining natural landscapes (excluding areas covered by infrastructure, lakes and river floodplains) exhibited expansion of thermokarst features resulting in more abundant small ponds, greater microrelief, more active lakeshore erosion and increased landscape and habitat heterogeneity. This transition to a new geoecological regime will have impacts to wildlife habitat, local residents and industry.
PubMed ID
24339207 View in PubMed
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Facing the limit of resilience: perceptions of climate change among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130013
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 11-21.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Facing the limit of resilience: perceptions of climate change among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden Maria Furberg1,2*, Birgitta Evengård1,2 and Maria Nilsson2 1Division of Infectious diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 2Umeå Centre for Global Health
  1 document  
Author
Maria Furberg
Birgitta Evengård
Maria Nilsson
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 11-21.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
501926
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Husbandry - methods - trends
Animals
Climate change
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - psychology
Reindeer
Seasons
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Young Adult
Sami
Perception
Abstract
The Arctic area is a part of the globe where the increase in global temperature has had the earliest noticeable effect and indigenous peoples, including the Swedish reindeer herding Sami, are amongst the first to be affected by these changes.
To explore the experiences and perceptions of climate change among Swedish reindeer herding Sami.
In-depth interviews with 14 Swedish reindeer herding Sami were performed, with purposive sampling. The interviews focused on the herders experiences of climate change, observed consequences and thoughts about this. The interviews were analysed using content analysis.
One core theme emerged from the interviews: facing the limit of resilience. Swedish reindeer-herding Sami perceive climate change as yet another stressor in their daily struggle. They have experienced severe and more rapidly shifting, unstable weather with associated changes in vegetation and alterations in the freeze-thaw cycle, all of which affect reindeer herding. The forecasts about climate change from authorities and scientists have contributed to stress and anxiety. Other societal developments have lead to decreased flexibility that obstructs adaptation. Some adaptive strategies are discordant with the traditional life of reindeer herding, and there is a fear among the Sami of being the last generation practising traditional reindeer herding.
The study illustrates the vulnerable situation of the reindeer herders and that climate change impact may have serious consequences for the trade and their overall way of life. Decision makers on all levels, both in Sweden and internationally, need improved insights into these complex issues to be able to make adequate decisions about adaptive climate change strategies.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2005 Jun;34(3):623-915737965
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
PubMed ID
22043218 View in PubMed
Documents
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Carbon footprint of telemedicine solutions--unexplored opportunity for reducing carbon emissions in the health sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262422
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e105040
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Asa Holmner
Kristie L Ebi
Lutfan Lazuardi
Maria Nilsson
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e105040
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Footprint - economics - statistics & numerical data
Climate Change - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - economics
Health Care Sector - economics
Hospitals, University
Humans
Sweden
Telemedicine - economics
Travel - economics
Videoconferencing - economics
Abstract
The healthcare sector is a significant contributor to global carbon emissions, in part due to extensive travelling by patients and health workers.
To evaluate the potential of telemedicine services based on videoconferencing technology to reduce travelling and thus carbon emissions in the healthcare sector.
A life cycle inventory was performed to evaluate the carbon reduction potential of telemedicine activities beyond a reduction in travel related emissions. The study included two rehabilitation units at Umeå University Hospital in Sweden. Carbon emissions generated during telemedicine appointments were compared with care-as-usual scenarios. Upper and lower bound emissions scenarios were created based on different teleconferencing solutions and thresholds for when telemedicine becomes favorable were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to pinpoint the most important contributors to emissions for different set-ups and use cases.
Replacing physical visits with telemedicine appointments resulted in a significant 40-70 times decrease in carbon emissions. Factors such as meeting duration, bandwidth and use rates influence emissions to various extents. According to the lower bound scenario, telemedicine becomes a greener choice at a distance of a few kilometers when the alternative is transport by car.
Telemedicine is a potent carbon reduction strategy in the health sector. But to contribute significantly to climate change mitigation, a paradigm shift might be required where telemedicine is regarded as an essential component of ordinary health care activities and not only considered to be a service to the few who lack access to care due to geography, isolation or other constraints.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25188322 View in PubMed
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