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2020 records – page 1 of 202.

A 1-year, three-couple expedition as a crew analog for a Mars mission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31234
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Gloria R Leon
Mera M Atlis
Deniz S Ones
Graeme Magor
Author Affiliation
Clinical Psychology, University of Minnesota, USA.
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Arctic Regions
Astronauts - psychology
Canada
Child
Cold Climate
Darkness
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mars
Norway
Personality
Personnel Selection
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Space Simulation
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
This study assessed the intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning of a three-couple expedition group that included a 2 1/2-year-old child which was ice-locked on a boat in the High Arctic during a major portion of the expedition. Personality assessment indicated that team members were generally well adjusted, scoring relatively higher on well-being and achievement and relatively lower on stress reactivity. Weekly mood ratings showed that the group exhibited significantly higher positive than negative affect. Reported negative events were relatively most frequent at the beginning of the Arctic stay and toward the end of the darkness period and were lowest during the initial darkness interval. The period of darkness had both a salutary and negative impact. A highly important means of coping with stress was seeking emotional support from one's partner. Selection of couples with strong bonds with their partner appears to be one viable approach for crew selection for long-duration missions.
PubMed ID
12481801 View in PubMed
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7th International Congress on Circumpolar Health. June 8-12, 1987, UmeƄ, Sweden, Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235798
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1987;45:1-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1987;45:1-79
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Humans
PubMed ID
3651197 View in PubMed
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A 14C age calibration curve for the last 60 ka: the Greenland-Hulu U/Th timescale and its impact on understanding the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in Western Eurasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91637
Source
J Hum Evol. 2008 Nov;55(5):772-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Weninger Bernhard
Jöris Olaf
Author Affiliation
Universität zu Köln, Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte, Radiocarbon Laboratory, Weyertal 125, 50923 Köln, Germany. b.weninger@uni-koeln.de
Source
J Hum Evol. 2008 Nov;55(5):772-81
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Calibration
China
Chronology as Topic
Climate
Greenland
Hominidae
Humans
Paleontology - methods
Radiometric Dating - methods
Abstract
This paper combines the data sets available today for 14C-age calibration of the last 60 ka. By stepwise synchronization of paleoclimate signatures, each of these sets of 14C-ages is compared with the U/Th-dated Chinese Hulu Cave speleothem records, which shows global paleoclimate change in high temporal resolution. By this synchronization we have established an absolute-dated Greenland-Hulu chronological framework, against which global paleoclimate data can be referenced, extending the 14C-age calibration curve back to the limits of the radiocarbon method. Based on this new, U/Th-based Greenland(Hulu) chronology, we confirm that the radiocarbon timescale underestimates calendar ages by several thousand years during most of Oxygen Isotope Stage 3. Major atmospheric 14C variations are observed for the period of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition, which has significant implications for dating the demise of the last Neandertals. The early part of "the transition" (with 14C ages > 35.0 ka 14C BP) coincides with the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion. This period is characterized by highly-elevated atmospheric 14C levels. The following period ca. 35.0-32.5 ka 14C BP shows a series of distinct large-scale 14C age inversions and extended plateaus. In consequence, individual archaeological 14C dates older than 35.0 ka 14C BP can be age-calibrated with relatively high precision, while individual dates in the interval 35.0-32.5 ka 14C BP are subject to large systematic age-'distortions,' and chronologies based on large data sets will show apparent age-overlaps of up to ca. 5,000 cal years. Nevertheless, the observed variations in past 14C levels are not as extreme as previously proposed ("Middle to Upper Paleolithic dating anomaly"), and the new chronological framework leaves ample room for application of radiocarbon dating in the age-range 45.0-25.0 ka 14C BP at high temporal resolution.
PubMed ID
18922563 View in PubMed
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20th century climate warming and tree-limit rise in the southern Scandes of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95958
Source
Ambio. 2001 Mar;30(2):72-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
Kullman L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. leif.kullman@eg.umu.se
Source
Ambio. 2001 Mar;30(2):72-80
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Geography
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Sweden
Trees - growth & development
Abstract
Climate warming by ca. 0.8 degree C between the late-19th and late-20th century, although with some fluctuations, has forced multispecies elevational tree-limit advance by > 100 m for the principal tree species in the Swedish part of the Scandinavian mountain range. Predominantly, these processes imply growth in height of old-established individuals and less frequently upslope migration of new individuals. After a slight retardation during some cooler decades after 1940, a new active phase of tree-limit advance has occurred with a series of exceptionally mild winters and some warm summers during the 1990s. The magnitude of total 20th century tree-limit rise varies with topoclimate and is mainly confined to wind-sheltered and snow-rich segments of the landscape. Thickening of birch tree stands in the "advance belt" has profoundly altered the general character of the subalpine/low alpine landscape and provides a positive feedback loop for further progressive change and resilience to short-term cooling episodes. All upslope tree-limit shifts and associated landscape transformations during the 20th century have occurred without appreciable time lags, which constitutes knowledge fundamental to the generation of realistic models concerning vegetation responses to potential future warming. The new and elevated pine tree-limit may be the highest during the past 4000 14C years. Thus, it is tentatively inferred that the 20th century climate is unusually warm in a late-Holocene perspective.
PubMed ID
11374309 View in PubMed
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[24-h profile of arterial pressure in hypertensive patients working in rotatory teams in conditions of Far North (Tyumen Region)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5525
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(1):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
L I Gapon
N P Shurkevich
A S Vetoshkin
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(1):41-5
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Autonomic Nervous System - physiopathology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Hypertension - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Russia
Abstract
AIM: To specify a 24-h profile of arterial pressure (AP) in hypertensive patients working in duty regime in the Far North (Tyumen Region). MATERIAL AND METHODS: AP parameters were studied in 155 males aged 25-59 with hypertension of stage I, II who were employed for duty work in the Far North areas and 38 control patients with hypertension stage I, II living in a moderate climatic zone (Tyumen). The groups were comparable by gender, age, duration of hypertension, office systolic and diastolic AP (SAP and DAP). All the patients have undergone 24-h monitoring of AP with assessment of basic mean parameters. RESULTS: The study group patients had scare symptoms and lower mean 24-h SAP, but high AP variability, high DAD as reflection of more significant structural changes of vessels and special functioning of the autonomic nervous system in the North. Mean 24-h AP showed more unfavourable changes in hypertensive subjects who had flight from Yamburg-Moscow-Yamburg. CONCLUSION: The data of the study dictate the necessity to develop a differentiated risk strategy for health promotion, prevention and treatment of hypertension in those who work in the North of Tyumen Region in duty regime.
PubMed ID
15759453 View in PubMed
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[2011 peaks the TBE incidence. The deer tribe variation in size and the weather are key factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124516
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Feb 15-21;109(7):343-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Thomas G T Jaenson
Marika Hjertqvist
Ake Lundkvist
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för organismbiologi, Uppsala universitet. thomas.jaenson@ebc.uu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Feb 15-21;109(7):343-6
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate
Deer - parasitology
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Ixodes - growth & development - parasitology
Risk factors
Rodentia - parasitology
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
22574428 View in PubMed
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4200 years of pine-dominated upland forest dynamics in west-central Mexico: human or natural legacy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155658
Source
Ecology. 2008 Jul;89(7):1893-907
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Blanca L Figueroa-Rangel
Katherine J Willis
Miguel Olvera-Vargas
Author Affiliation
Oxford Long-term Ecology Laboratory, Oxford University Centre for the Environment, School of Geography, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QY, United Kingdom. bfrangel@cucsur.udg.mx
Source
Ecology. 2008 Jul;89(7):1893-907
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Ecosystem
Fossils
Human Activities
Humans
Mexico
Paleontology
Pinus - physiology
Pollen
Population Dynamics
Soil
Time Factors
Trees - physiology
Abstract
The pine-dominated forests of west-central Mexico are internationally recognized for their high biodiversity, and some areas are protected through various conservation measures including prohibition of human activity. In this region, however, there is evidence for human settlement dating back to ca. AD 1200. It is therefore unclear whether the present forest composition and structure are part of a successional stage following use by indigenous human populations during the past, or due to natural processes, such as climate. We present a study reconstructing the vegetation dynamics of pine-dominated forest over the past 4200 years using paleoecological techniques. Results from fossil pollen and charcoal indicate that, in this region, pine-dominated forests are the native vegetation type and not anthropogenically derived secondary succession. The predominant driving mechanism for the expansion of pine-dominated forest appears to be intervals of aridity and naturally induced burning. A close association is noted between pine abundance and longer-term climatic trends, including intervals of aridity between ca. 4200 and 2500, 1200 and 850, and 500 and 200 cal yr BP and shorter-term trends. Evident periodicity occurs in pine and Poaceae abundance every 80 years. These short-term quasi-periodic oscillations have been recorded in a number of lake and ocean sediments in Mexico and are thought to be linked to solar forcing resulting in drought cycles that occur at approximately the same time intervals.
PubMed ID
18705376 View in PubMed
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[A 1 year study at a coroner's station of cause of death in primary heart-aorta cases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255698
Source
Lakartidningen. 1972 Jan 12;69(3):264-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-1972

Aboriginal hunting buffers climate-driven fire-size variability in Australia's spinifex grasslands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123525
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jun 26;109(26):10287-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2012
Author
Rebecca Bliege Bird
Brian F Codding
Peter G Kauhanen
Douglas W Bird
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. rbird@stanford.edu
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jun 26;109(26):10287-92
Date
Jun-26-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Ecosystem
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Poaceae
Abstract
Across diverse ecosystems, greater climatic variability tends to increase wildfire size, particularly in Australia, where alternating wet-dry cycles increase vegetation growth, only to leave a dry overgrown landscape highly susceptible to fire spread. Aboriginal Australian hunting fires have been hypothesized to buffer such variability, mitigating mortality on small-mammal populations, which have suffered declines and extinctions in the arid zone coincident with Aboriginal depopulation. We test the hypothesis that the relationship between climate and fire size is buffered through the maintenance of an anthropogenic, fine-grained fire regime by comparing the effect of climatic variability on landscapes dominated by Martu Aboriginal hunting fires with those dominated by lightning fires. We show that Aboriginal fires are smaller, more tightly clustered, and remain small even when climate variation causes huge fires in the lightning region. As these effects likely benefit threatened small-mammal species, Aboriginal hunters should be considered trophic facilitators, and policies aimed at reducing the risk of large fires should promote land-management strategies consistent with Aboriginal burning regimes.
Notes
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2007 Feb 7;274(1608):341-617164197
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2006 Dec;20(6):1610-917181796
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Sep 30;105(39):14796-80118809925
Cites: Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2010 Aug;85(3):501-2120015313
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2009 Sep 22;276(1671):3249-5619535372
Cites: Science. 2009 Nov 20;326(5956):1100-319965426
Cites: Science. 2009 Apr 24;324(5926):481-419390038
PubMed ID
22689979 View in PubMed
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2020 records – page 1 of 202.