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Alternative drug use for the climacteric in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208597
Source
Maturitas. 1997 May;27(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
T. Mäntyranta
E. Hemminki
I. Kangas
P. Topo
A. Uutela
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. taina.mantyranta@helsinki.fi
Source
Maturitas. 1997 May;27(1):5-11
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climacteric
Complementary Therapies
Educational Status
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Finland
Food, Fortified
Humans
Middle Aged
Nonprescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Urban Population
Abstract
To investigate the use of alternative drugs for the climacteric in Finland, which products are used, and who are the women using them.
The study was based on a population-based survey conducted in 1989 among 2000 Finnish women aged 45-64 (response rate 86%).
11% of the women reported the use of alternative drugs for the climacteric. Food supplements and bee products were the most common types of alternative drugs used. Some of them may have allergic or other side effects. Users differ little from other women judging by health habits and the utilization of health care services. The best predictors for alternative drug use were urban residence, more than 9 years of general education, and among 50 54-year olds, the use of prescription or OTC drugs for menopause. Over half of the users of alternative drugs had also used hormone therapy.
Women using alternative drugs during and after the climacteric represent a large group. More information is needed about the clinical effects of alternative drugs, and the characteristics of alternative drug users.
PubMed ID
9158072 View in PubMed
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[Attitude to and practice of Norwegian gynecologists concerning hormone replacement therapy in climacteric]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54351
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Aug 20;118(19):2940-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1998
Author
S T Nilsen
T. Fredriksen
O E Iversen
M H Moen
Author Affiliation
Kvinneklinikken Sentralsjukehuset i Rogaland, Stavanger.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Aug 20;118(19):2940-3
Date
Aug-20-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Climacteric
English Abstract
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Menopause
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - prevention & control
Norway
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
A questionnaire was sent to all 475 members of the Norwegian Gynaecological Society. It was based on a similar study previously performed in Denmark and Sweden. 85% of the members returned the questionnaire. 382 (80%) had answered the questions; 153 (40%) women, 228 (60%) men, and one case where the sex was not stated. The mean age was 48 years (SD 10). The male gynaecologists had a more liberal attitude towards hormone replacement therapy than their female counterparts, 43% of them recommending oestrogen for all women, compared to 31% of the female gynaecologists. The younger doctors were more restrictive in their recommendations but attitudes became more liberal the older the doctors were. Among gynaecologists over 55 years, 49% of males and 50% of females recommended oestrogen for all women. The final decision as to whether or not to take hormone replacement therapy was most often made by the patient herself (61%). The majority of both female (86%) and male (75%) gynaecologists considered risk factors for heart disease to be an indication for oestrogen. In perimenopausal women, 356 (93%) preferred oral cyclical oestrogen combined with progestagen, whereas in postmenopausal women 333 (87%) preferred to take oral oestrogen combined with progestagen continuously.
PubMed ID
9748831 View in PubMed
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Biological factors are more important than socio-demographic and psychosocial conditions in relation to hypertension in middle-aged women. The Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9857
Source
Blood Press. 2002;11(5):270-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Jonas Lidfeldt
Per Nyberg
Christina Nerbrand
Agneta Ojehagen
Göran Samsioe
Bengt Scherstén
Carl-David Agardh
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jonas.lidfeldt@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Blood Press. 2002;11(5):270-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Climacteric
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Education
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Lipids - blood
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
The objective of this cross-sectional study was to analyse the influence of biological, socio-demographic, and psychosocial factors and current perimenopausal status on hypertension in a geographically defined population of 10,766 women aged 50-59 years, of whom 6901 attended the study. Altogether 1887 (27.3%) women had hypertension: 996 with drug treatment and 891 diagnosed at the study. In a logistic multiple regression analysis (controlled for age), drug treatment of hyperlipidaemia, family history of hypertension, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index (BMI) increase > or = 25% during the past 25 years, S-triglycerides, S-cholesterol, education up to comprehensive school, and to upper secondary school, consumption of 84-167 g of alcohol/week, and of > or = 168 g of alcohol/week, were positively associated with hypertension, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and current smoking were negatively associated. A significant interaction was found between current smoking and BMI increase, with a lower risk for hypertension among smokers who had increased their BMI > or = 25%. No interaction was found between smoking and alcohol. In conclusion, hypertension was predominantly associated with biological factors, and with heredity for hypertension. Of the socio-demographic factors, only low level of education was associated with hypertension in a comprehensive analysis. Perimenopausal status showed no relation to occurrence of hypertension in the multiple regression analysis. The risk for hypertension increased with moderate and high consumption of alcohol, whereas smoking showed a decreased risk. Among women with weight gain, present smoking remained protective. Although both smoking and hypertension are established risk factors for cardiovascular disease, they seem not to be directly linked, indicating a complexity of mechanisms.
PubMed ID
12458649 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and sleep in women aged 40 to 64 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73031
Source
Maturitas. 1995 Jun;22(1):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
R. Asplund
H E Aberg
Author Affiliation
County Hospital, Strömsund, Sweden.
Source
Maturitas. 1995 Jun;22(1):1-8
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - drug effects - physiology
Body mass index
Climacteric - drug effects - physiology
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Sampling Studies
Sleep - drug effects - physiology
Sweden
Abstract
A questionnaire study was carried out in 6000 randomly selected women in the County of Jämtland in Sweden. The response rate was 61.2%. Questions were asked about general health, height and body weight, sleep, menstruation and menopausal complaints. There were also questions about visits to doctors and the use of sleeping pills and hormone preparations. A deterioration of the night's sleep after the age of 60 years was associated especially with a low body mass index (BMI). In the subgroup with a BMI below 20 (kg m-2), frequent awakenings were reported 4 times more often in women 60-64 years old than in those aged 40-44 years. No such difference was found with a BMI > or = 30. In the age group 60-64 years twice as many women with BMI > or = 30 as women with BMI or = 30kg m-2.
PubMed ID
7666811 View in PubMed
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Canadian rural-urban differences in end-of-life care setting transitions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120692
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2012 Sep;4(5):1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Donna M Wilson
Roger Thomas
Katharina Kathy Kovacs Burns
Jessica A Hewitt
Jane Osei-Waree
Sandra Robertson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. donna.wilson@ualberta.ca
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2012 Sep;4(5):1-13
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Climacteric
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Terminal Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Travel
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Few studies have focused on the care setting transitions that occur in the last year of life. People living in rural areas may have more difficult care setting transitions and also more moves in the last year of life as health changes occur. A mixed-methods study was conducted to gain an understanding of the number and implications or impact of care setting transitions in the last year of life for rural Canadians. Rural Albertans had significantly more healthcare setting transitions than urbanites in the last year of life (M=4.2 vs 3.3). Online family respondents reported 8 moves on average occurred in the last year of life. These moves were most often identified (65%) on a likert-type scale as "very difficult," with the free text information revealing these trips were often emotionally painful for themselves and physically painful for the decedent. Eleven informants were then interviewed until data saturation, with constant-comparative data analysis conducted. Moving from place to place for needed care in the last year of life was identified as common and concerning for rural people and their families, with three data themes developing: (a) needed care in the last year of life is scattered across many places, (b) traveling is very difficult for terminally-ill persons and their caregivers, and (c) local rural services are minimal. These findings indicate planning is needed to avoid unnecessary end-of-life care setting transitions and to make needed moves for essential services in the last year of life less costly, stressful, and socially disruptive for rural people and their families.
PubMed ID
22980372 View in PubMed
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Changes in body weight and onset of hypertension in perimenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183123
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 Nov;17(11):775-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
M. Juntunen
L. Niskanen
J. Saarelainen
M. Tuppurainen
S. Saarikoski
R. Honkanen
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 Nov;17(11):775-9
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Body mass index
Climacteric
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
We assessed the determinants of onset of hypertension in a large, prospective population-based study of perimenopausal women from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention (OSTPRE) study. The data collection started in 1989, when a baseline postal inquiry was sent to all women aged 47-56 years (n=14 220) residing in the Kuopio Province in Eastern Finland. Names, social security numbers and addresses were obtained from the Population Register Centre of Finland. A total of 11 798 women responded at baseline and at 5-year follow-up in 1994. After the exclusion of 1777 women with prevalent hypertension at baseline and women with missing height or weight information, the study population consisted of 9485 without established hypertension at baseline. New cases of established hypertension during the follow-up (n=908) were ascertained with the Registry of Specially Refunded Drugs of the Finnish Social Insurance Institution (SII). According to the National Health Insurance, the SII granted 90% reimbursement for drug costs in defined chronic illnesses necessitating continuous medication, like arterial hypertension. Weight and weight gain both raised the risk by 5% per kg (P
PubMed ID
14578917 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of estrogen-treated women. A descriptive epidemiological study of a Swedish population. Part II.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26978
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1983;62(4):297-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
I. Persson
H O Adami
B S Lindberg
E D Johansson
P. Manell
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1983;62(4):297-302
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body Composition
Castration
Climacteric - drug effects
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Estrogens - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Hysterectomy
Menarche
Menopause
Middle Aged
Parity
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Uterine Neoplasms - chemically induced
Abstract
A cohort of 23 233 women who had received estrogen prescriptions was recruited for a prospective study of estrogen therapy and the associated risk of endometrial cancer. For a detailed study, a comprehensive questionnaire was mailed to 735 randomly sampled cohort members, and 89 per cent of them responded. Estrogen exposure and its implications were described in a preceding paper (part I). The present paper reports the distribution in the cohort sample of personal features known to be risk factors for endometrial cancer. A comparison with results from various materials derived from population-based surveys and case-control studies implied that the cohort members might have a lower proportion of nulliparity (infertility) and a somewhat higher prevalence of hypertension. Differences in the distributions of age at menarche or menopause, weight, height and prevalence of diabetes were according to these comparisons slight and probably without clinical significance. It was concluded that the prevalence of risk factors for endometrial cancer other than estrogen exposure was not higher in the cohort than in the background population. Moreover, approximately one-fifth of the estrogen takers had been freed of their risk through hysterectomies.
PubMed ID
6637403 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of the climacteric syndrome in females living in the monsoon climate of Vladivostok].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109268
Source
Akush Ginekol (Mosk). 1970 Dec;46(12):32-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1970
Author
P F Matveeva
Source
Akush Ginekol (Mosk). 1970 Dec;46(12):32-6
Date
Dec-1970
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Climacteric
Climate
Female
Humans
Menopause
Middle Aged
Siberia
Weather
PubMed ID
5519550 View in PubMed
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Climacteric hormone therapy in medical and lay texts in Finland from 1955 to 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207649
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1997 Sep;45(5):751-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
P. Topo
Author Affiliation
National Research and Development Center for Welfare and Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1997 Sep;45(5):751-60
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Climacteric - drug effects
Diffusion of Innovation
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - adverse effects - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Care Team - trends
Publishing - trends
Social Values
Abstract
The "social shaping of technologies" approach holds that a technology is both socially embedded and that it shapes the social environment. The aim of this study was to investigate how hormone therapy use during the climacterium and subsequently was socially shaped in texts published in the main Finnish medical journals and lay magazines during 1955-1992. In these two arenas physicians, especially gynecologists, played the major role in the debate and their professional knowledge on hormone therapy was mixed with their views on women's status and roles, the quality of life and fears about aging when they were promoting hormone use, especially in the lay magazines. This type of argument for the promotion of hormone use persisted in the most recent texts, despite the availability of substantial evidence both for the against of hormone therapy. Overall, the texts clearly favored the benefits of the therapy. Three periods of differing orientation can be discerned. Attitudes towards hormone therapy tended to be cautious from 1955 through the 1970s, more enthusiastic in the 1980s, and mixed at the start of the 1990s. In the most recent texts critical comments came from individual women who had used the therapy or decided not to, including female physicians and other professionals. The results suggest that hormone therapy is socially embedded, but may also shape perceptions and the understanding of women's aging. The social shaping of the technology approach may improve our understanding of the development of health policy towards women at and after the age of the climacterium.
PubMed ID
9226798 View in PubMed
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[Climacteric problems in 52- and 54-year-old women in the municipality of Linköping]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46752
Source
Lakartidningen. 1985 Jun 12;82(24):2244-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-1985

77 records – page 1 of 8.