Skip header and navigation

Refine By

9182 records – page 1 of 919.

The 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV, DSM-V, and ICD-10 among nondemented 75-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124775
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Nilsson, J
Östling, S
Waern, M
Karlsson, B
SigstrÖm, R
Xinxin Guo
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interview, Psychological
Life Style
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To examine the 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), and the overlap between these criteria, in a population sample of 75-year-olds. We also aimed to examine comorbidity between GAD and other psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression.
During 2005-2006, a comprehensive semistructured psychiatric interview was conducted by trained nurses in a representative population sample of 75-year-olds without dementia in Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 777; 299 men and 478 women). All psychiatric diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV. GAD was also diagnosed according to ICD-10 and DSM-V.
The 1-month prevalence of GAD was 4.1% (N = 32) according to DSM-IV, 4.5% (N = 35) according to DSM-V, and 3.7% (N = 29) according to ICD-10. Only 46.9% of those with DSM-IV GAD fulfilled ICD-10 criteria, and only 51.7% and 44.8% of those with ICD-10 GAD fulfilled DSM-IV/V criteria. Instead, 84.4% and 74.3% of those with DSM-IV/V GAD and 89.7% of those with ICD-10 GAD had depression. Also other psychiatric diagnoses were common in those with ICD-10 and DSM-IV GAD. Only a small minority with GAD, irrespective of criteria, had no other comorbid psychiatric disorder. ICD-10 GAD was related to an increased mortality rate.
While GAD was common in 75-year-olds, DSM-IV/V and ICD-10 captured different individuals. Current definitions of GAD may comprise two different expressions of the disease. There was greater congruence between GAD in either classification system and depression than between DSM-IV/V GAD and ICD-10 GAD, emphasizing the close link between these entities.
PubMed ID
22549369 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 1-Year Quantitative Survey of Noro-, Adeno-, Human Boca-, and Hepatitis E Viruses in Raw and Secondarily Treated Sewage from Two Plants in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272273
Source
Food Environ Virol. 2015 Sep;7(3):213-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
M. Myrmel
H. Lange
E. Rimstad
Source
Food Environ Virol. 2015 Sep;7(3):213-23
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Environmental monitoring
Genotype
Hepatitis E virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Human bocavirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Norovirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Norway
Phylogeny
Seasons
Sewage - virology
Water Pollution
Water Purification - instrumentation
Abstract
A study of enteric viruses in raw and treated sewage from two secondary treatment plants, which received sewage from Oslo city (plant A) and small municipalities in Hedmark county in Norway (plant B), showed high levels of noro-, adeno-, and bocavirus throughout the year. A seasonal variation was observed for adeno- and GII norovirus with higher levels during winter and bocavirus that had more positive samples during winter. The virus concentrations in raw sewage were comparable in the two plants, with medians (log10 genome copies per liter) of 6.1, 6.3, 6.0, and 4.5 for noro GI, noro GII, adeno-, and bocavirus, respectively. The level of hepatitis E virus was not determined as it was below the limit of quantification. The mean log10 virus reduction was 0.55 (plant A) and 1.44 (plant B) with the highest reduction found in the plant with longer hydraulic retention time. The adenoviruses were dominantly serotype 41, while serotype 12 appeared sporadically. Of the 102 raw and treated sewage samples that were tested, eight were positive for hepatitis E virus of which four were from treated sewage. Two of the four obtained gene sequences from hepatitis E virus originated from the rural sewage samples and showed high similarity with a genotype 3 strain of hepatitis E virus detected in local piglets. Two other hepatitis E virus sequences obtained from urban sewage samples showed high similarities with genotype 3 strains isolated from urban sewage in Spain and a human genotype 1 isolate from India. The study gives information on the levels of noroviruses in raw and treated sewage, which is valuable to risk assessment, information indicating that some infections with hepatitis E viruses in Norway have a regional origin and that human bocavirus 2 and 3 are prevalent in the Norwegian population.
PubMed ID
26003323 View in PubMed
Less detail

1-year retention and social function after buprenorphine-assisted relapse prevention treatment for heroin dependence in Sweden: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186500
Source
Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):662-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-2003
Author
Johan Kakko
Kerstin Dybrandt Svanborg
Mary Jeanne Kreek
Markus Heilig
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Neurotec, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, S-141 86, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):662-8
Date
Feb-22-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Buprenorphine - therapeutic use
Counseling
Female
Heroin Dependence - classification - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Narcotic Antagonists - therapeutic use
Psychotherapy, Group
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The partial opiate-receptor agonist buprenorphine has been suggested for treatment of heroin dependence, but there are few long-term and placebo-controlled studies of its effectiveness. We aimed to assess the 1-year efficacy of buprenorphine in combination with intensive psychosocial therapy for treatment of heroin dependence.
40 individuals aged older than 20 years, who met DSM-IV criteria for opiate dependence for at least 1 year, but did not fulfil Swedish legal criteria for methadone maintenance treatment were randomly allocated either to daily buprenorphine (fixed dose 16 mg sublingually for 12 months; supervised daily administration for a least 6 months, possible take-home doses thereafter) or a tapered 6 day regimen of buprenorphine, thereafter followed by placebo. All patients participated in cognitive-behavioural group therapy to prevent relapse, received weekly individual counselling sessions, and submitted thrice weekly supervised urine samples for analysis to detect illicit drug use. Our primary endpoint was 1-year retention in treatment and analysis was by intention to treat.
1-year retention in treatment was 75% and 0% in the buprenorphine and placebo groups, respectively (p=0.0001; risk ratio 58.7 [95% CI 7.4-467.4]). Urine screens were about 75% negative for illicit opiates, central stimulants, cannabinoids, and benzodiazepines in the patients remaining in treatment.
The combination of buprenorphine and intensive psychosocial treatment is safe and highly efficacious, and should be added to the treatment options available for individuals who are dependent on heroin.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1907; author reply 1907-812788596
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):634-512606172
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1906-7; author reply 1907-812788595
PubMed ID
12606177 View in PubMed
Less detail

3,520 medication errors evaluated to assess the potential for IT-based decision support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133611
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;166:31-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kristine Binzer
Annemarie Hellebek
Author Affiliation
Unit for Patient Safety, Capital Region of Denmark.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;166:31-7
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - organization & administration
Denmark
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Medication Errors - classification - statistics & numerical data
Software Design
Abstract
We have previously studied system failures involved in medication errors using a limited number of root cause analyses as source. The aim of this study was to describe a larger number of medication errors with respect to harm, involved medicines and involved system problems - thus providing information for the development of IT-based decision support. We evaluated 3,520 medication error reports derived from 12 months of consecutive reporting from 13 hospitals in the Capital Region of Denmark. We found 0.65% errors with serious harm and 16% with moderate harm. A small number of medicines were involved in the majority of the errors. The problems in the medication error process were heterogeneous. Some were related to specific medicines and others were related to the computerized order entry system. Accordingly decision support targeted at specific medicines and improved IT systems are part of the continuing work to reduce the frequency of medication errors.
PubMed ID
21685608 View in PubMed
Less detail

[3-year follow-up of a child psychiatric cohort]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78052
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Apr 2;169(14):1317-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2-2007
Author
Bilenberg Niels
Pedersen Dorthe
Author Affiliation
Odense Universitetshospital, Det Børne- og Ungdomspsykiatriske Hus. niels.bilenberg@ouh.fyns-amt.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Apr 2;169(14):1317-21
Date
Apr-2-2007
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - diagnosis - therapy
Parents
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Publications on prospective follow-up studies of Danish child psychiatric cohorts are scarce. Such studies are necessary in order to be able to inform patients about the natural course and prognosis of child psychiatric disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baseline data is obtained from 110 children, ie. 91 boys and 19 girls (4-13 years old) assessed in 2 child and adolescent psychiatric outpatient clinics in Denmark. As part of the baseline assessment, the children were clinically diagnosed and covered most of the child psychopathological spectrum. Baseline information included demographic data, assessment of symptom-load by means of The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and a global function score. The children in the cohort were assessed once a year using the CBCL and the Teachers Report Form (TRF). RESULTS: The symptom-load is declining, although still high during the follow-up period. The decline in total behaviour problem scores was greater in the group of children diagnosed with emotional and behavioural disorders compared to those with neuropsychiatric disorders (Attention deficits and Autism spectrum disorders). CONCLUSION: In spite of the relatively small sample size, this follow-up study identifies important issues of prognostic value in this clinical child psychiatric outpatient population. The material may be useful as a 'treatment as usual' group in future clinical outcome studies.
PubMed ID
17437695 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 3-year follow-up study of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195752
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
G. Sjögren
S O Hedlund
C. Jonsson
A. Sandström
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Materials Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. Goran.Sjogren@odont.umu.se
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bicuspid
Ceramics - chemistry
Color
Dental Caries - classification
Dental Marginal Adaptation
Dental Plaque - classification
Dental Restoration Failure
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - classification
Glass - chemistry
Humans
Inlays - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Molar
Quartz - chemistry
Surface Properties
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.
Nine Class I and 30 Class II beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations were placed in 16 patients who were seen regularly by personnel at Umeå University Dental School. The California Dental Association criteria were used to evaluate the restorations at baseline, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years after luting. The occurrence of postoperative sensitivity, the time taken to manufacture each restoration, and certain periodontal conditions were also evaluated.
Sixty-nine percent of the restorations were rated satisfactory at the 3-year examination. During the follow-up period, 4 became loose and 7 were fractured or had flaking surfaces. Caries was registered in connection with 1 restoration. Excellent ratings were obtained for marginal integrity, anatomic form, surface, and color in 62%, 84%, 32%, and 44% of the restorations, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of plaque and bleeding on probing in comparison with the controls. The mean overall time for placement was 38 minutes. The estimated survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 59% after 3.5 years.
The quality of the beta-quartz glass-ceramic restorations in the present study was inferior to that presented in most earlier studies of ceramic or resin composite posterior restorations placed in patients treated at university clinics. Both the technique and the beta-quartz glass-ceramic inserts have to be evaluated in more long-term studies to assess the possibility of their serving as an alternative restorative technique.
PubMed ID
11203902 View in PubMed
Less detail

[4 new species of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) from Central Asia, Siberia and the Far East]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50863
Source
Parazitologiia. 2000 May-Jun;34(3):241-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A V Iankovskii
Source
Parazitologiia. 2000 May-Jun;34(3):241-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Asia, Central
English Abstract
Female
Larva - anatomy & histology - classification
Male
Nymph - anatomy & histology - classification
Pupa - anatomy & histology - classification
Siberia
Simuliidae - anatomy & histology - classification
Abstract
Four new species of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) are described. Helodon rezidentsii Yankovsky, sp. n., Khabarovsk Territory, differs from all known species of the genus with morphology of eyes consisting only of microommatidii in male; from related species H. kamtshaticus (Rubzov, 1940) with large triangular posteromedial lobes of branches of genital fork in female; with number of rays of primary fan of premandibles (20-22, when in H. kamtshaticus 30-32) in larva. Helodon submulticaulis Yankovsky, sp. n., Transbaikalia, differs from related species H. multicaulis (Popov, 1968) with number of rays of primary fan of mandibles (36-40, when in H. multicaulis 26-28), narrow anterior branches of anal sclerite, number of rows of hooks in posterior attachment organ (88-92, when in H. multicaulis 78-80) in larva; with morphology of respiratory organ, consisting of 5-8 lobes bearing 40-60 tune filaments (in H. multicaulis 3-4 lobes bearing more than 150 filaments) in pupa. Sch. samarkandica Yankovsky, sp. n., Uzbekistan, differs from related species Sch. pseudopusilla Rubzov, 1956 with 3 (not 2 as in Sch. pseudopusilla) hooks in parameres, bifurcated lateral branches of X sternite, long projection of gonostyles in male. Schoenbaueria ivdelensis Yankovsky, sp. n., Middle Ural, differs from related species Sch. rangiferina (Rubzov, 1956) with prolonged gonostyles bearing narrow projection in male; with number of rays of secondary fan of premandibles (20-28, when in Sch. rangiferina 44-48), deep ventral groove of cephalic capsule, number of rows of hooks in posterior attachment organ (80-82, when in Sch. rangiferina 70-72) in larva; with morphology of respiratory organ (very long stems of 2 and 3 pairs of filaments) in pupa.
PubMed ID
10920845 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 5-year follow-up of occlusal status and radiographic findings in mandibular condyles of the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187416
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2002 Nov-Dec;15(6):539-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaija Hiltunen
Miira M Vehkalahti
Jaakko S Peltola
Anja Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. kaija.hiltunen@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2002 Nov-Dec;15(6):539-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Dentition
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Dentures
Dislocations - classification - radiography
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - classification - rehabilitation
Logistic Models
Male
Mandibular Condyle - radiography
Odds Ratio
Osteoarthritis - classification - radiography
Osteosclerosis - classification - radiography
Radiography, Panoramic
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - classification - radiography
Abstract
The aim of the present 5-year follow-up was to clarify the nature of occlusal support status and radiographic changes in condyles of the elderly, and the association between these two variables.
The present study is part of a comprehensive medical survey of a random sample born in 1904, 1909, and 1914. A total of 364 subjects living in Helsinki participated in the dental part of the examination during 1990 to 1991, and after 5 years a total of 103 were reexamined. Comprehensive data on occlusal support status were available for 94 subjects, and radiographic data were available for 88 subjects. Occlusal support status was assessed on the basis of the Eichner index, radiographic changes were assessed from panoramic radiographs, and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were assessed using Helkimo's anamnestic index.
The most frequent radiographic finding in the mandibular joint was flattening of the articular surface of the condyle associated with osteoarthrosis, found at baseline in 17% and during follow-up in 13% of the subjects. During the 5-year follow-up, Eichner index for natural dentition remained unaltered in 94% of the subjects and in 85% of the subjects when removable dentures were included. There were no radiographic changes in 92% of the cases. No differences based on age or gender were found. A logistic regression model revealed associations between the selected baseline factors. The odds ratio for baseline Helkimo's anamnestic index was 4.1, 5.7 for Eichner index with the support of removable dentures, and 356 for radiographic findings.
Radiographic changes in condyles of elderly people were small during the 5-year follow-up, but baseline radiographic findings, Helkimo's anamnestic index, and Eichner index with removable dentures were risk factors for radiographic findings at the end of the follow-up.
PubMed ID
12475158 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 5-year follow-up of signs and symptoms of TMD and radiographic findings in the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182090
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2003 Nov-Dec;16(6):631-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaija Hiltunen
Jaakko S Peltola
Miira M Vehkalahti
Timo Närhi
Anja Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. kaija.hiltunen@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2003 Nov-Dec;16(6):631-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mandibular Condyle - physiopathology - radiography
Radiography, Panoramic
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Sex Factors
Temporomandibular Joint - physiopathology - radiography
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - classification - physiopathology - radiography
Abstract
The aim was to clarify the associations among subjective symptoms, clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and radiographic findings in the mandibular condyles of elderly people during a 5-year follow-up.
As part of a comprehensive medical survey of a random sample born in 1904, 1909, and 1914 (Helsinki Aging Study), 364 subjects living in Helsinki participated in the dental part of the examination during 1990 and 1991; after 5 years, 103 of these were reexamined. Comprehensive data on TMD were available for 94 subjects, and radiographic data were available for 88. TMD were assessed by Helkimo's anamnestic and clinical indices, and radiographic status was assessed by panoramic radiographs.
During the 5-year follow-up, reported anamnestic symptoms of TMD for men changed little (9%); among women, the change from baseline was 42%. When the unchanged indices were compared, the gender difference was obvious. At baseline, 5% of the women, but no men, had severe signs (clinical index III) of TMD. At the end of follow-up, none showed severe signs. Comparison of radiographic findings between baseline and follow-up showed no differences, nor did differences appear in associations between radiographic findings and anamnestic or clinical indices.
During the 5-year follow-up, signs and symptoms of TMD in these elderly individuals became milder or vanished. The radiographic status of the condyles remained stable, and no association appeared between radiographic findings and signs and symptoms of TMD.
PubMed ID
14714843 View in PubMed
Less detail

5-year incidence of age-related maculopathy in the Reykjavik Eye Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51922
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 Jan;112(1):132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Fridbert Jonasson
Arsaell Arnarsson
Tunde Peto
Hiroshi Sasaki
Kazuyuki Sasaki
Alan C Bird
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. fridbert@landspitali.is
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 Jan;112(1):132-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Macular Degeneration - classification - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
PURPOSE: To examine the age- and gender-specific 5-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in citizens of Reykjavik. DESIGN: Population-based, prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: The cohort was a population-based random sample of citizens 50 years and older. Of 1379 eligible subjects, 1045 had a baseline examination in 1996; 846 of the 958 survivors (88.2%) had a 5-year follow-up examination in 2001. METHODS: The incidence of various characteristics of drusen and pigmentary changes that are typical of ARM were determined using the international classification and grading system for ARM and AMD. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Early ARM and AMD were assessed by masked grading of stereo fundus photographs. RESULTS: Hypopigmentation developed at 5 years in 10.7% of people 50 to 59 years of age (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9-14.4) and in 25.7% those 70 to 79 years of age (95% CI, 18.4-33.0) at baseline. Age-related macular degeneration developed in no one who was 50 to 59 years of age at baseline. Geographic atrophy (GA) developed in 4.6% (95% CI, 1.2-7.9) and exudative AMD in none of those who were 70 years and older at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Geographic atrophy is the predominant type of AMD in Iceland, and the ratio of GA to neovascular AMD is higher than in racially similar populations.
PubMed ID
15629833 View in PubMed
Less detail

9182 records – page 1 of 919.