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Challenging cause of bullous eruption of the hands in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298560
Source
BMJ Case Rep. 2018 Nov 08; 2018:
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Nov-08-2018
Author
Bo Kristiansen
Luit Penninga
Jon Erik Fraes Diernaes
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
Source
BMJ Case Rep. 2018 Nov 08; 2018:
Date
Nov-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Australia
Citrus aurantiifolia - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Phototoxic - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Diagnosis, Differential
Greenland - ethnology
Hand
Humans
Male
Pruritus - drug therapy - etiology
Skin
Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Sunlight - adverse effects
Abstract
Phytophotodermatitis is caused by deposition of photosensitising compounds on the skin followed by ultraviolet exposure. We present an unusual case of a 29-year-old Australian male visiting Greenland who presented with severe itchy bullous eruption on his hands. The cause was a combination of exposure to lime fruit juice and prolonged sun exposure from the Arctic midnight sun.
PubMed ID
30413443 View in PubMed
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Changes in fruit, vegetable and juice consumption after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: a prospective study in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281910
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(5):712-719
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Camilla Olofsson
Andrea Discacciati
Agneta Åkesson
Nicola Orsini
Kerstin Brismar
Alicja Wolk
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(5):712-719
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Beverages
Body mass index
Citrus paradisi
Citrus sinensis
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology
Diet
Educational Status
Exercise
Fruit
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Given the importance of prevention of complications in type 2 diabetes (T2D), we aimed to examine changes over time in consumption of fruits, vegetables and juice among men who were diagnosed with T2D in comparison with men without diabetes. The prospective Cohort of Swedish Men, aged 45-79 years in 1997, was used to examine changes in diet after diagnosis of T2D. Dietary intake was assessed using FFQ in 1997 and 2009. In all, 23 953 men who were diabetes free at baseline (1997) and completed both FFQ were eligible to participate in the study. Diagnosis of T2D was reported by subjects and ascertained through registers. Multivariable linear mixed models were used to examine changes in mean servings/week over time. In total, 1741 men developed T2D during the study period. Increased consumption of vegetables and fruits was observed among those who developed T2D (equivalent to 1·6 servings/week, 95 % CI 1·08, 2·03) and men who remained diabetes free (0·7 servings/week, 95 % CI 0·54, 0·84). Consumption of juice decreased by 0·6 servings/week (95 % CI -0·71, -0·39) among those who developed T2D and increased by 0·1 servings/week (95 % CI 0·05, 0·15) in those who were diabetes free. Changes over time and between groups were statistically significant. Although improvements in diet were observed, only 36 % of those with T2D and 35 % of those without diabetes consumed =5 servings of fruits and vegetables/d in 2009.
PubMed ID
27409648 View in PubMed
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Consumers liking of private labels. An evaluation of intrinsic and extrinsic orange juice cues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136026
Source
Appetite. 2011 Jun;56(3):770-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Nina Veflen Olsen
Elena Menichelli
Christine Meyer
Tormod Næs
Author Affiliation
Nofima Mat, Oslovn.1, 1430 Ås, Norway. nina.veflen.olsen@nofima.no
Source
Appetite. 2011 Jun;56(3):770-7
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Beverages
Choice Behavior - physiology
Citrus sinensis
Consumer Satisfaction
Cues
Female
Food Labeling
Food Preferences - physiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this article is to compare product quality and brand choice for private labels (PL) and national brands (NB). Over the past two decades, PL have gained larger and larger share of grocery sales, and nowadays PL play a crucial part in the European food retail sector. Since it is stated that most PL have moved on from being mostly low cost me-too products to become also premium products, we want to investigate if objective and perceived quality of PL fits the quality of NB. Four hypotheses are stated and tested on orange juice data from Norway. A trained sensory panel and consumers (n=105) evaluated six juice samples that vary according to three factors. These factors were (1) Brand (PL and NB), (2) Treatment (Gentle heat treatment and Pasteurized) and (3) Pulp (with and without). Principal component analysis, two-way ANOVA, and PLS regression were conducted, and the results indicate that variation in quality exists both among PL and NB, there is a large discrepancy between blind liking and brand choice, and that consumers with a positive attitude towards PL are more likely to choose a PL instead of a NB.
PubMed ID
21420457 View in PubMed
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Dental erosive wear and salivary flow rate in physically active young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125878
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2012;12:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Aida Mulic
Anne Bjørg Tveit
Dag Songe
Hanne Sivertsen
Anne B Skaare
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. aida.mulic@odont.uio.no
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2012;12:8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Citrus - adverse effects
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dentin - pathology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate
Tooth Erosion - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Little attention has been directed towards identifying the relationship between physical exercise, dental erosive wear and salivary secretion. The study aimed i) to describe the prevalence and severity of dental erosive wear among a group of physically active young adults, ii) to describe the patterns of dietary consumption and lifestyle among these individuals and iii) to study possible effect of exercise on salivary flow rate.
Young members (age range 18-32 years) of a fitness-centre were invited to participate in the study. Inclusion criteria were healthy young adults training hard at least twice a week. A non-exercising comparison group was selected from an ongoing study among 18-year-olds. Two hundred and twenty participants accepted an intraoral examination and completed a questionnaire. Seventy of the exercising participants provided saliva samples. The examination was performed at the fitness-centre or at a dental clinic (comparison group), using tested erosive wear system (VEDE). Saliva sampling (unstimulated and stimulated) was performed before and after exercise. Occlusal surfaces of the first molars in both jaws and the labial and palatal surfaces of the upper incisors and canines were selected as index teeth.
Dental erosive wear was registered in 64% of the exercising participants, more often in the older age group, and in 20% of the comparison group. Enamel lesions were most observed in the upper central incisors (33%); dentine lesions in lower first molar (27%). One fourth of the participants had erosive wear into dentine, significantly more in males than in females (p = 0.047). More participants with erosive wear had decreased salivary flow during exercise compared with the non-erosion group (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22443448 View in PubMed
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Dental health behavior, gastroesophageal disorders and dietary habits among Norwegian recruits in 1990 and 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49747
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2003 Apr;61(2):100-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Ståle Myklebust
Ivar Espelid
Sigurd Svalestad
Anne Bjørg Tveit
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, University of Bergen, Norway. Stale.Myklebust@odont.uib.no
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2003 Apr;61(2):100-4
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Beverages - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Citrus sinensis
Drinking
Female
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Food Habits
Fruit - adverse effects
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Malus
Military Personnel
Norway
Oral Hygiene
Physical Fitness
Tooth Erosion - etiology
Abstract
A questionnaire was given to representative samples of Norwegian recruits in 1990 and 1999 to explore dental health habits, history of gastroesophageal disorders and diet with possible relations to dental erosion. The samples were 792 (mean age 20.9 years) and 676 (mean age 21.6 years), respectively, and the corresponding responses were 62% and 100%. Minor differences in self-reported dental health habits and gastroesophageal disorders were found. The respondents' dentists had provided information about dental erosion for 8.2% of the respondents in 1990 versus 14.5% in 1999. There was an increase in the reported frequency of daily intake of juice from 17% to 24% (P = 0.006) and carbonated soft drink from 54% to 61% (P = 0.025) in the period 1990-99. The frequency of training activity showed minor changes, but in 1999 it was more common to drink during exercise (94% versus 74% in 1990, P
PubMed ID
12790507 View in PubMed
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Determination of plant polyphenols in Danish foodstuffs by HPLC-UV and LC-MS detection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61940
Source
Cancer Lett. 1997 Mar 19;114(1-2):165-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-19-1997
Author
U. Justesen
P. Knuthsen
T. Leth
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade.
Source
Cancer Lett. 1997 Mar 19;114(1-2):165-7
Date
Mar-19-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Citrus - chemistry
Denmark
Diet
Flavonoids - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Mass Fragmentography
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
To estimate the contents of flavonoids in the Danish diet, we have used a high performance liquid chromatographic method for the analysis of fruits, vegetables and beverages. The flavonoid contents were quantified, and the observations were verified by mass spectrometry. The investigation is not completed, but we are able to give an preliminary estimate of the daily flavonoid intake at 26 mg/day. The major food contributors are tea, onions, apples, oranges, and orange juice. Other food subjects have high flavonoid contents, but the daily intake is low, so their contributions to the average daily intake are negligible.
PubMed ID
9103280 View in PubMed
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Dietary factors and risk of lung cancer in never-smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21390
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Nov 9;78(4):430-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-9-1998
Author
F. Nyberg
V. Agrenius
K. Svartengren
C. Svensson
G. Pershagen
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Fredrik.Nyberg@imm.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Nov 9;78(4):430-6
Date
Nov-9-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Citrus - adverse effects
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Phytotherapy
Protective Agents - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Smoking
Vegetables - therapeutic use
Abstract
We studied dietary risk factors for lung cancer among never-smokers in a population-based case-control study in Stockholm, 1989-1995. Study subjects were older than 30 years of age and had never smoked regularly. A total of 124 cases (35 men, 89 women) and 235 controls (72 men, 163 women) participated. Exposure information was obtained at interview with study subjects. The never-smoking status was validated by interviews with next-of-kin. A protective effect was suggested for vegetables, mediated primarily by carrots (relative risk [RR], 0.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4-1.3, and 0.6, 0.3-1.1 for intermediate and high consumption of carrots, respectively). Non-citrus fruits appeared to lower the risk as well, with RR 0.6, 95% CI 0.3-1.3 and 0.5, 0.3-1.0 for intermediate and high consumption, respectively. A protective effect with dose-response was also seen for intake of beta-carotene and total carotenoids. Increased risks were seen for cultured milk products in both genders (RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.9 for intermediate and 1.6, 0.9-2.9 for high consumption), but for milk only among male high consumers. Our results support evidence linking a diet rich in vegetables and non-citrus fruit with decreased lung cancer risk and suggests that among vegetables, carrot consumption is the most important component or marker for this effect in Sweden. The results regarding milk products could be consistent with dietary fat as a risk factor for lung cancer, although a more comprehensive assessment of fat intake is necessary to explore this relation.
PubMed ID
9797130 View in PubMed
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Does dietary elimination in infancy prevent or only postpone a food allergy? A study of fish and citrus allergy in 375 children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246160
Source
Lancet. 1980 Jan 26;1(8161):166-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-1980
Author
U M Saarinen
M. Kajosaari
Source
Lancet. 1980 Jan 26;1(8161):166-7
Date
Jan-26-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child, Preschool
Citrus - adverse effects
Diet
Finland
Fish Products - adverse effects
Food Hypersensitivity - diet therapy - etiology - prevention & control
Food Preferences
Humans
Time Factors
Abstract
In a study of fish and citrus allergy these foods were strictly avoided in 177 children up to 1 year of age, whereas 152 children had started taking fish before age 6 months and 145 children had started taking citrus fruits beofre 3 months. Both fish and citrus allergy, defined by a positive challenge, were found at age 3 years in a similar frequency (about 3%) in children with and without the first-year elimination. The results suggest that food allergy in childhood can be postponed but not prevented by dietary elimination in infancy.
PubMed ID
6101629 View in PubMed
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Food allergy in Finnish children aged 1 to 6 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242903
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1982 Sep;71(5):815-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1982
Author
M. Kajosaari
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1982 Sep;71(5):815-9
Date
Sep-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - diagnostic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Citrus - adverse effects
Eggs - adverse effects
Finland
Fish Products - adverse effects
Food Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Abstract
Food allergy was studied in a total of 866 Finnish children aged 1, 2, 3 and 6 years in the Helsinki region. The diagnosis was based on history as well as on elimination and challenge performed at home concerning fish, citrus fruit and eggs. The prevalence of food allergy was 19% at one year of age, increased to a peak of 27% at three years, and thereafter decreased to 8% at six years of age. The most common allergenic foods were citrus fruit, tomato, eggs, strawberry and fish. A positive history of food allergy could be confirmed by challenge in about half of the cases in the younger age groups and in 100% at six years of age. The data indicate that food allergy is common in Finnish children.
PubMed ID
7180451 View in PubMed
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