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638 records – page 1 of 64.

[75 years safeguarding health of warriors of Saints-Petersburg (Leningrad) garrison].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112659
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 Mar;334(3):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
A N Tsymbal
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 Mar;334(3):78-82
Date
Mar-2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - history - methods - organization & administration
Cities
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Hospitals, Military - history - organization & administration
Humans
Military Medicine - history - organization & administration
Military Personnel
Russia
World War II
Abstract
The article is devoted to the anniversary of Consultation-and-diagnostic outpatient hospital of 442nd District military clinical hospital in Saint-Petersburg. This outpatient hospital was founded in on the 20th March 1938. Work of garrison outpatient hospital was especially difficult during the Great Patriotic War. Employees of this hospital heroically fulfilled their duties in conditions of severe blocade winter 1941-1942. The outpatient hospital was nominally garrison, in fact this hospital operated units of Leningrad front-line. In 1993 the garrison outpatient hospital was renamed as 104th Consultation-and-diagnostic. The main branch of activity is health maintenance of participants in the rectification of the consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station and veterans (case follow up) belonging to special risk subunits. Nowadays there are 30 treatment-and-diagnostic departments including staff military physician board.
PubMed ID
23808219 View in PubMed
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137Cs in puddle sediments as timescale tracer in urban environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268380
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2015 Apr;142:9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Andrian A Seleznev
Ilia V Yarmoshenko
Alexander P Sergeev
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2015 Apr;142:9-13
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Cities
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Radiation monitoring
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
The (137)Cs-based chronological approach is suggested to identify the age of urban landscapes and the chronology of pollution of soil in residential areas. Three main pivot points constitute the basis of the chronological approach: beginning of the Atomic Era in 1945, the maximum input in 1963 and the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Application of (137)Cs as a timescale tracer was tested on the example of Ekaterinburg, a city in the Middle Urals region of Russia. The sampling of recent urban sediments of micro water bodies (puddles) was carried out in 210 locations in 2007-2010. The concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Mn and Fe, and activity concentrations of (137)Cs were measured. It was found that the (137)Cs concentrations in the puddle sediments correlated with the age of surrounding buildings determined by the year of construction. The correlations between the concentrations of metals and (137)Cs in the puddle sediments identified the major pollutants of the urban area, assessing their background concentrations and obtaining the average annual inputs.
PubMed ID
25615884 View in PubMed
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Aalborg, Denmark: a role model for waste management practices to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98696
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):837-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009

Accident prediction models for urban roads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187221
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2003 Mar;35(2):273-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Poul Greibe
Author Affiliation
Danish Transport Research Institute, Knuth Winterfeldts Allé, DK-2800 Kgs, Lyngby, Denmark. Poul@greibe.dk
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2003 Mar;35(2):273-85
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
City Planning - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Linear Models
Models, Statistical
Abstract
This paper describes some of the main findings from two separate studies on accident prediction models for urban junctions and urban road links described in [Uheldsmodel for bygader-Del1: Modeller for 3-og 4-benede kryds. Notat 22, The Danish Road Directorate, 1995; Uheldsmodel for bygader- Del2: Modeller for straekninger. Notat 59, The Danish Road Directorate, 1998] (Greibe and Hemdorff, 1995, 1988). The main objective for the studies was to establish simple, practicable accident models that can predict the expected number of accidents at urban junctions and road links as accurately as possible. The models can be used to identify factors affecting road safety and in relation to 'black spot' identification and network safety analysis undertaken by local road authorities. The accident prediction models are based on data from 1036 junctions and 142 km road links in urban areas. Generalised linear modelling techniques were used to relate accident frequencies to explanatory variables. The estimated accident prediction models for road links were capable of describing more than 60% of the systematic variation ('percentage-explained' value) while the models for junctions had lower values. This indicates that modelling accidents for road links is less complicated than for junctions, probably due to a more uniform accident pattern and a simpler traffic flow exposure or due to lack of adequate explanatory variables for junctions. Explanatory variables describing road design and road geometry proved to be significant for road link models but less important in junction models. The most powerful variable for all models was motor vehicle traffic flow.
PubMed ID
12504148 View in PubMed
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Active school transportation in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada: an exploration of trends in space and time (1986-2006).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152165
Source
Prev Med. 2009 Jun;48(6):507-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Ron N Buliung
Raktim Mitra
Guy Faulkner
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road N, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. ron.buliung@utoronto.ca
Source
Prev Med. 2009 Jun;48(6):507-12
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling - physiology
Child
City Planning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Motor Activity
Motor Vehicles
Ontario
Retrospective Studies
Schools
Students
Time Factors
Transportation - methods
Urban Population
Walking - physiology
Abstract
This study describes temporal and spatial trends in active transportation for school trips in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada's largest city-region.
Proportions of trips by travel mode to and from school were estimated and compared for children (11-13 years) and youth (14-15 years). Data were drawn from the 1986, 1996, 2001, and 2006 versions of the Transportation Tomorrow Survey (TTS).
Between 1986 and 2006, walking mode share for trips to school declined (53.0%-42.5% for 11-13 year olds, 38.6%-30.7% for 14-15 year olds). Although there has also been a decline in walking home from school, walking rates were higher in the afternoon. In 2006, younger children in the suburbs walked less to school (36.1%-42.3% of trips) than 11-13 year olds in Toronto (48.1%) and Toronto's 14-15 year olds walked less (38.3% of trips) but used transit more (44.8% of trips) than students in the suburbs.
The findings indicate a period of decline (1986-2006) in the use of active modes for journeys to and from school for both age groups. Policies and programs to increase active transportation should acknowledge the spatial, temporal, and demographic heterogeneity of school travel decisions and outcomes.
Notes
Comment In: Prev Med. 2009 Jun;48(6):513-519500552
PubMed ID
19272403 View in PubMed
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Acute impacts of extreme temperature exposure on emergency room admissions related to mental and behavior disorders in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256377
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Xiang Wang
Eric Lavigne
Hélène Ouellette-kuntz
Bingshu E Chen
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Environmental Issues Division, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Canada. Electronic address: wanqus@gmail.com.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cities
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Nonlinear Dynamics
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of extreme ambient temperature on hospital emergency room visits (ER) related to mental and behavioral illnesses in Toronto, Canada.
A time series study was conducted using health and climatic data from 2002 to 2010 in Toronto, Canada. Relative risks (RRs) for increases in emergency room (ER) visits were estimated for specific mental and behavioral diseases (MBD) after exposure to hot and cold temperatures while using the 50th percentile of the daily mean temperature as reference. Poisson regression models using a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) were used. We adjusted for the effects of seasonality, humidity, day-of-the-week and outdoor air pollutants.
We found a strong association between MBD ER visits and mean daily temperature at 28?C. The association was strongest within a period of 0-4 days for exposure to hot temperatures. A 29% (RR=1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.53) increase in MBD ER vists was observed over a cumulative period of 7 days after exposure to high ambient temperature (99th percentile vs. 50th percentile). Similar associations were reported for schizophrenia, mood, and neurotic disorers. No significant associations with cold temperatures were reported.
The ecological nature and the fact that only one city was investigated.
Our findings suggest that extreme temperature poses a risk to the health and wellbeing for individuals with mental and behavior illnesses. Patient management and education may need to be improved as extreme temperatures may become more prevalent with climate change.
PubMed ID
24332428 View in PubMed
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Addressing the social determinants of health at the local level: Opportunities and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290655
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Feb; 46(20_suppl):47-52
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
E Fosse
M K Helgesen
S Hagen
S Torp
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Health Promotion and Development, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Feb; 46(20_suppl):47-52
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cities
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Local Government
Norway
Social Determinants of Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The gradient in health inequalities reflects a relationship between health and social circumstance, demonstrating that health worsens as you move down the socio-economic scale. For more than a decade, the Norwegian National government has developed policies to reduce social inequalities in health by levelling the social gradient. The adoption of the Public Health Act in 2012 was a further movement towards a comprehensive policy. The main aim of the act is to reduce social health inequalities by adopting a Health in All Policies approach. The municipalities are regarded key in the implementation of the act. The SODEMIFA project aimed to study the development of the new public health policy, with a particular emphasis on its implementation in municipalities.
In the SODEMIFA project, a mixed-methods approach was applied, and the data consisted of surveys as well as qualitative interviews. The informants were policymakers at the national and local level.
Our findings indicate that the municipalities had a rather vague understanding of the concept of health inequalities, and even more so, the concept of the social gradient in health. The most common understanding was that policy to reduce social inequalities concerned disadvantaged groups. Accordingly, policies and measures would be directed at these groups, rather than addressing the social gradient.
A movement towards an increased understanding and adoption of the new, comprehensive public health policy was observed. However, to continue this process, both local and national levels must stay committed to the principles of the act.
PubMed ID
29552960 View in PubMed
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[Adelaida Petrovna Zagriadskaia, the founder of the Nizhnii Novgorod School of Forensic Medical Experts].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262367
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2014 Nov-Dec;57(6):5-7
Publication Type
Article

Adhesion and enrichment of metals on human hands from contaminated soil at an Arctic urban brownfield.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148602
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Aug 15;43(16):6385-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2009
Author
Steven D Siciliano
K. James
Guiyin Zhang
Alexis N Schafer
J Derek Peak
Author Affiliation
Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8, Canada, Steven.siciliano@usask.ca
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Aug 15;43(16):6385-90
Date
Aug-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesiveness
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cities
Hand
Humans
Metals - analysis
Occupational Exposure
Particle Size
Risk assessment
Soil
Soil Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Human exposure to contaminated soils drives clean up criteria at many urban brownfields. Current risk assessment guidelines assume that humans ingest some fraction of soil smaller than 4 mm but have no estimates of what fraction of soil is ingested by humans. Here, we evaluated soil adherence to human hands for 13 agricultural soils from Saskatchewan, Canada and 17 different soils from a brownfield located in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada. In addition, we estimated average particle size adhering to human hands for residents of a northern urban setting. Further, we estimated how metal concentrations differed between the adhered and bulk (
PubMed ID
19746741 View in PubMed
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638 records – page 1 of 64.