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1991-1996: Alaska's progress towards the goals of Healthy People 2000

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88238
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 6(1)
Publication Type
Report
Date
Feb-1998
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 6(1)
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Behavioral risk factors
Cholesterol screening
Cigarette smoking
Diabetes
Fruit and vegetable consumption
Heart disease
Inflluenza amd pneumonia immunizations
Mammography and clinical breast exams
Overweight
Pap tests
Physical activity
Proctoscopic exams
Safety belt use
Abstract
The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services implemented the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1990 incooperation with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The system gathers information about the health-related lifestyle choices of Alaskan adults related to leading causes of death such as heart disease, cancer and injury. The program is part of an ongoing national data collection system. Results are analyzed each year to improve our understanding of Alaskanhealth habits and to measure progress toward national and state health objectives. This report summarizes survey findings from1991 to 1996 and compares the results to selected national health objectives presented in the Healthy People 2000 publication.
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Addictive behaviors, social and psychosocial factors, and electronic cigarette use among adolescents: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290960
Source
Public Health. 2018 Feb; 155:129-132
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
M Lindström
M Rosvall
Author Affiliation
Social Medicine and Health Policy, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. Electronic address: martin.lindstrom@med.lu.se.
Source
Public Health. 2018 Feb; 155:129-132
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Behavior, addictive - psychology
Cigarette Smoking - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Narcotics
Risk factors
Schools
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaping - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim was to investigate associations between e-cigarette use and social and psychosocial factors and cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and narcotics use among adolescents attending 9th grade in primary school and 2nd grade in secondary school.
Cross-sectional study.
The public health survey among adolescents in Scania in 2016 includes pupils in grades 9 and 2. The associations between e-cigarette use and lifestyle, social and psychosocial factors, and trust were investigated with logistic regressions.
In 9th grade, 32% of male pupils and 27% of female pupils had ever used e-cigarettes, and in 2nd grade, 43% of males and 31% of females had ever used e-cigarettes. E-cigarette use was significantly associated with current smoking, snus (a moist powder tobacco product originating in Sweden) use, water pipe use, intensive alcohol consumption, and narcotics and also with psychosocial conditions related to home and parents, peers, and school.
The prevalence of ever e-cigarette use was high among adolescents attending both grades. E-cigarette use was most strongly associated with health-related lifestyles. It was also associated with psychosocial factors such as study difficulties, school stress, problems talking with parents, and generalized trust.
PubMed ID
29353186 View in PubMed
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Adolescent daily cigarette smoking: Is rural residency a risk factor?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101093
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2008 Jan-Mar;8(1):875
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-Mar 2008
Author
Lutfiyya, MN
Shah, KK
Johnson, M
Bales, RW
Cha, I
McGrath, C
Serpa, L
Lipsky, MS
Author Affiliation
University of Illinois, College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, Illinois, USA. lutfiyya@uic.edu
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2008 Jan-Mar;8(1):875
Date
Jan-Mar 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
adolescents
Daily cigarette smoking
Demographic factors
Rural locales
US
Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Daily cigarette smoking among US adolescents remains a significant public health problem. Understanding risk is important in order to develop strategies to reduce this type of tobacco use. Purpose: The primary objective of this research was to examine whether rural residency is an independent risk factor for being a daily smoker among adolescents ages 12 to 18 years.METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study where univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were performed on a merged 1997-2003 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System dataset to determine whether rural residence was a significant risk factor for daily cigarette smoking, after adjusting for demographic factors.RESULTS: Using daily smoking as the dependent variable, initial multivariate analyses revealed that adolescents who lived either in suburban (OR=.34, CI=.32, .36) or urban (OR=.33, CI=.31, .35) locales were less likely to become daily smokers than adolescents living in rural locales. Subsequent logistic regression analysis yielded that rural youths who became daily smokers were more likely to: have used smokeless tobacco products in the past 12 months (OR=1.25, CI=1.04,1.51); be female (OR=1.42, CI=1.23, 1.64); be Caucasian (OR=1.53, CI=1.28, 1.84); have first smoked a whole cigarette when they were 12 years of age or younger (OR=2.08, CI=1.82, 2.38); and have smoked at school in the past 30 days (OR=14.52, CI=11.97, 17.60).CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that rural residency is a risk factor for tobacco use among US youth.
PubMed ID
18366278 View in PubMed
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Assessing the effect of public health information by incentivised risk estimation: An example on Swedish snus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299929
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2018 04; 54:51-57
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
04-2018
Author
Daniel Bergsvik
Ole Rogeberg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Department of Drug Policy, PO Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway; Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research, Gaustadalléen 21, 0349 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: daniel.bergsvik@fhi.no.
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2018 04; 54:51-57
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cigarette Smoking - adverse effects
Female
Health education
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation - methods
Reward
Risk Assessment - methods
Sweden
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
Abstract
The provision of accurate information on health damaging behaviours and products is a widely accepted and widespread governmental task. It is easily mismanaged. This study demonstrates a simple method which can help to evaluate whether such information corrects recipient risk beliefs.
Participants assess risks numerically, before and after being exposed to a relevant risk communication. Accuracy is incentivised by awarding financial prizes to answers closest to a pursued risk belief. To illustrate this method, 228 students from the University of Oslo, Norway, were asked to estimate the mortality risk of Swedish snus and cigarettes twice, before and after being exposed to one of three risk communications with information on the health dangers of snus.
The data allow us to measure how participants updated their risk beliefs after being exposed to different risk communications. Risk information from the government strongly distorted risk perceptions for snus. A newspaper article discussing the relative risks of cigarettes and snus reduced belief errors regarding snus risks, but increased belief errors regarding smoking. The perceived quality of the risk communication was not associated with decreased belief errors.
Public health information can potentially make the public less informed on risks about harmful products or behaviours. This risk can be reduced by targeting identified, measurable belief errors and empirically assessing how alternative communications affect these. The proposed method of incentivised risk estimation might be helpful in future assessments of risk communications.
PubMed ID
29414485 View in PubMed
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Association between iq'mik smokeless tobacco use and cardiometabolic risk profile among Yup'ik Alaska Native people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298510
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 07; 23(5):488-502
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
07-2018
Author
Tove K Ryman
Bert B Boyer
Scarlett E Hopkins
Jacques Philip
Beti Thompson
Shirley A A Beresford
Kenneth E Thummel
Melissa A Austin
Author Affiliation
a Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health , University of Washington , Seattle , WA , USA.
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 07; 23(5):488-502
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska Natives - statistics & numerical data
Biomarkers
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology
Cigarette Smoking - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Tobacco, Smokeless - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The traditional lifestyle of Yup'ik Alaska Native people, including a diet abundant in marine-based foods and physical activity, may be cardio-protective. However, iq'mik, a traditional form of smokeless tobacco used by >50% of Yup'ik adults, could increase cardiometabolic (CM) risk. Our objective was to characterize the associations between iq'mik use and biomarkers of CM status (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], triglycerides [TG], systolic blood pressure [SBP] and diastolic blood pressure [DBP], glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c], fasting blood glucose [FBG], waist circumference [WC], and body mass index [BMI]).
We assessed these associations using data from a cross-sectional sample of Yup'ik adults (n?=?874). Current iq'mik use, demographic, and lifestyle data were collected through interviews. Fasting blood samples were collected to measure LDL-C, HDL-C, TG, HbA1c, and FBG. SBP, DBP, WC, and BMI were obtained by physical examination. We characterized the association between current iq'mik use and continuous biomarkers of CM status using multiple approaches, including adjustment for measures of Yup'ik lifestyle and a propensity score.
Based on either adjustment method, current iq'mik use was significantly and positively associated with at least 5% higher HDL-C, and significantly associated but in an inverse direction with multiple biomarkers of CM status including 7% lower TG, 0.05% lower HbA1c, 2% lower FBG, 4% lower WC, and 4% lower BMI. Observed associations for LDL-C, SBP, and DBP varied by adjustment method.
This inverse association between iq'mik use and cardiometabolic risk status has not been previously reported. Additional research is needed to replicate these findings and explore physiological mechanisms and/or confounding factors.
PubMed ID
28116909 View in PubMed
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Cigarette smoking and hip volumetric bone mineral density and cortical volume loss in older adults: The AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299034
Source
Bone. 2018 03; 108:186-192
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Elisa A Marques
Martine Elbejjani
Vilmundur Gudnason
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Thomas Lang
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Thor Aspelund
Kristin Siggeirsdottir
Lenore Launer
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Tamara B Harris
Author Affiliation
National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: elisa.marques@nih.gov.
Source
Bone. 2018 03; 108:186-192
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Bone Resorption - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Cigarette Smoking - adverse effects
Cortical Bone - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Pelvic Bones - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
This study aimed to explore the relationships of several indicators of cigarette smoking habits (smoking status, pack-years, age at smoking initiation and smoking cessation) with quantitative computed tomographic (QCT)-derived proximal femur bone measures (trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD and the ratio of cortical to total tissue volume (cvol/ivol)) and with subsequent change in these measures over the next five years. A total of 2673 older adults (55.9% women), aged 66-92?years at baseline from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, who had two QCT scans of the hip were studied. In multivariable linear regression models, compared to never-smokers, current smokers had lower cvol/ivol at baseline and former-smokers had poorer measures on all outcomes (lower trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD and cvol/ivol), even when adjusted for several potential confounders. Further, among former smokers, those with higher pack-years had worse bone outcomes and those with longer duration since smoking cessation had better bone health at baseline. Analyses of change in bone measures revealed that compared to never-smokers, current smokers had significantly greater loss of trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD, and cvol/ivol. The regression models included adjustment for sex, age, education, and baseline body mass index, creatinine, % weight change from age 50, 25OHD, physical activity level, high-sensitive C-Reactive protein levels, alcohol and coffee consumption, history of diabetes mellitus, arthritis, and respiratory diseases. In conclusion, both current and former smoking showed adverse associations with bone health assessed with QCT. Results suggest that current smoking in particular may aggravate the rate of bone loss at older age and highlight implications for targeting this risk factor in populations that present higher smoking prevalence and vulnerability to bone fragility.
PubMed ID
29331300 View in PubMed
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Do never smokers make up an increasing share of snus users as cigarette smoking declines? Changes in smoking status among male snus users in Norway 2003-15.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289979
Source
Addiction. 2017 Feb; 112(2):340-348
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Karl Erik Lund
Tord Finne Vedøy
Linda Bauld
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 2017 Feb; 112(2):340-348
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cigarette Smoking - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tobacco, Smokeless - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine how the relative size of six groups of male ever snus users (current and former users of snus who were current, former or never cigarette smokers) varied over time in Norway, and how these groups differ with regard to important measures of tobacco behaviour.
Repeated cross-sectional nationally representative surveys of tobacco use. The association between survey year and the six categories of ever snus use was examined using cross-tabulation and multinomial logistic regression. Differences in tobacco behaviour across snus use categories were examined using logistic and ordinary least squares (OLS) regression.
Norway, 2003-15.
A total of 2067 males aged 15-79 years.
The categories of ever snus use represented all six combinations of cigarette smoking (current, former or never) among current and former users of snus. The variables measuring tobacco behaviour were: order of product uptake (snus or cigarettes first), mean cigarette consumption, reduction from daily to occasional smoking, intention to quit cigarettes, future smoking identity and use of snus in latest quit attempt.
During the period 2003-15, the relative share of current snus users who had never smoked, and current snus users who were former smokers, increased. The share of dual users, and smokers who were former snus users, decreased. Among men who reported life-time experience with both products, a large majority had initiated their tobacco use with cigarettes. The average number of cigarettes smoked weekly was lower among dual users compared with current smokers who were former snus users or had never used snus.
During the period 2003-15 in Norway, which has a mature snus market, even though smoking has declined and the relative size of the category of never-smokers among male users of snus has increased, the majority of snus users are still former or current smokers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27741374 View in PubMed
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Effect of ß-Carotene Supplementation on the Risk of Pneumonia Is Heterogeneous in Males: Effect Modification by Cigarette Smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297571
Source
J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). 2018; 64(5):374-378
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Harri Hemilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki.
Source
J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). 2018; 64(5):374-378
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cigarette Smoking - adverse effects
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - etiology
Risk
Smoking
alpha-Tocopherol - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - adverse effects
Abstract
Beta-carotene has been suggested to be a factor for improving the immune system, which implies that it might decrease the risk of infections. We therefore analyzed whether beta-carotene supplementation influenced pneumonia risk in 14,564 Finnish male smokers of the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Study. There were 231 pneumonia cases in the beta-carotene group and 217 cases in the placebo group. Thus, beta-carotene had no effect on the average incidence of pneumonia, RR=1.07 (95% CI: 0.89-1.29). However, cigarette smoking exposure significantly modified the effect. Beta-carotene increased pneumonia risk by RR=4.0 (95% CI: 1.63-10) among 990 participants who started to smoke at the age of =21 y and smoked =21 cigarettes per day at the study baseline. However, beta-carotene had no influence on pneumonia risk for the remaining participants. We also analyzed the effect of beta-carotene on participants who quit smoking during the ATBC Study. Among 4,290 participants who quit smoking, the 58 pneumonia cases were evenly distributed between the beta-carotene and placebo groups with RR=0.93 (95% CI: 0.55-1.55). Accordingly, no evidence was found that beta-carotene decreased pneumonia risk; instead, it significantly increased the incidence of pneumonia in a subgroup that covered 7% of the study population.
PubMed ID
30381628 View in PubMed
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Effect of Smoking Behavior before and during Pregnancy on Selected Birth Outcomes among Singleton Full-Term Pregnancy: A Murmansk County Birth Registry Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288032
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Aug 02;14(8)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-02-2017
Author
Olga A Kharkova
Andrej M Grjibovski
Alexandra Krettek
Evert Nieboer
Jon Ø Odland
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Aug 02;14(8)
Date
Aug-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Body Size
Cigarette Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Female
Head - anatomy & histology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Registries
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of our study was to assess associations between smoking behavior before and during pregnancy and selected adverse birth outcomes. This study is based on the Murmansk County Birth Registry (MCBR). Our study includes women who delivered a singleton pregnancy after 37 weeks of gestation (N = 44,486). Smoking information was self-reported and assessed at the first antenatal visit during pregnancy. We adjusted for potential confounders using logistic regression. The highest proportion of infants with low values of birth weight, birth length, head circumference, ponderal index and of the Apgar score at 5 min was observed for women who smoked both before and during pregnancy. We observed a dose-response relationship between the number of cigarettes smoked per day during pregnancy and the odds of the aforementioned adverse birth outcomes; neither were there significant differences in their occurrences among non-smokers and those who smoked before but not during pregnancy. Moreover, smoking reduction during pregnancy relative to its pre-gestation level did not influence the odds of the adverse birth outcomes. Our findings emphasize a continued need for action against tobacco smoking during pregnancy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28767086 View in PubMed
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Health behaviors of American Indians and Alaska Natives: Findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1993-1996

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292753
Publication Type
Report
Date
1999
more alcoholic beverages during the previous month. Health Behaviors ofAmerican Indians and Alaska alive: Findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1993-1996 11 Cig~reffe Sm.oking Cigarette smoking was defined as having ever smoked at least 100 cigarettes and currently smoke
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24 records – page 1 of 3.